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Old 12-21-2009, 09:03 AM   #1
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Can anyone guess how to replicate these wings?

Can anyone guess how to replicate these wings?

very crispy wings. It's not thick like Kentucky's. It's more like Korean's.


Judging from the looks, can anyone guess what flours are used or what combination of flours?

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Old 12-21-2009, 09:14 AM   #2
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Crispy, oriental-style meat dishes, and some extra crispy wings that I make, use corn starch as a coating. No flour. Tempura uses a combination of corn starch and rice flour.

For every dozen wings, I then use 1/2 cup of sauce, toss in a large bowl (just keep tossing with tongs until fully coated - it won't seem to be enough sauce at first, but it is) and serve immediately.

(Wings will go soggy, so don't add sauce until just ready to serve. And refrigerate without sauce - keeping them separate.)
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Old 12-21-2009, 10:33 AM   #3
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My guess is a combo of corn starch and fine flour.

San Tung is a Chinese-Korean restaurant.

I have posted what I have done when cooking KFC http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f21/korean-fried-chicken-47443.html In my post on 10-26-2009 you will see a pic of wings that the batter is very close to what you have posted. To cook them I used a Korean frying mix they contain things like wheat flour, rice flour, baking powder ect.

I will also highly recommend twice frying. First time at around 325-330 until they just start to turn brown. After they have cooled down fry them again around 350-375 until crisp.

The sauce looks like a variation of Kkanpung saeu (hangul: 깐풍새우), or deep-fried breaded sweet and sour shrimp. These can be real spicy depending upon where you get them.

Link for Kkanpung saeu (in Korean)http://cafe.naver.com/ArticleRead.nhn?clubid=10298136&articleid=3359110

As Selkie mentioned a little sauce goes a long ways and don't put it on until just before serving.
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Old 12-21-2009, 11:27 AM   #4
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I would think rice flour would be the case here. Looking at the bloom on it, it seems to fit the mark.
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Old 12-27-2009, 06:21 AM   #5
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Thanks guys for the inputs!

powerplantop, I've looked at your KFC and they looked so good.

How does the coating on your wings feel?
Is it crispy but a bit soggy or is it crispy and hard?

I tried frying at 325F first and then at 375F and it resulted in a slightly crispy but a bit soggy coating.

Btw, any ideas on how to replicate the sauce?

thanks
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Old 12-27-2009, 07:05 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surfol View Post
Thanks guys for the inputs!

powerplantop, I've looked at your KFC and they looked so good.

How does the coating on your wings feel?
Is it crispy but a bit soggy or is it crispy and hard?

I tried frying at 325F first and then at 375F and it resulted in a slightly crispy but a bit soggy coating.

Btw, any ideas on how to replicate the sauce?

thanks

When I use just corn starch it will get a bit soggy in the sauce but still crispy.

When I use Wondra flour it stays crispy but is kind of hard.

When I use the Korean fry mix its kind of a mix of both. Its hard to explain but its a mix in a good way.

I have seen a new Korean fry mix that says crispy fry mix. I might try that one next.

Sauce I used this one on some shrimp last week and it would go good on wings. This is in the same cataory as the pic you posted but its not the same. Do a google image search for this 깐풍새우 If you find a blog post that the sauce looks the same I will try to help you translate it.

Sauce:
2 tablespoon chili oil
4 or 5 dried peppers
Add dried peppers to hot chili oil cook a few seconds then add:
1 tablespoon garlic
1/2 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon ginger juice
Pinch of salt.
3 tablespoons finely chopped onion
2 Finely chopped red pepper
2 Finely chopped green pepper
Cook 2 or 3 minutes.
Mix 1/4 cup water with 1/2 tablespoon corn starch add to pan and mix. When mixed and hot add shrimp. Coat shrimp and serve.

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Old 12-30-2009, 09:11 AM   #7
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Thanks for the reply

Btw, how do you fry them?

Do you wait until the temperature is 325F and then put the chicken pieces and let it cook without monitoring the temperature or adjusting the heat anymore.

Or, do you keep monitoring the temperature and adjust the heat as many times as necessary to maintain 325F?

I've been getting inconsistent results and I'm pretty sure it has to do with the way I fry them. Sometimes I get a crispy hard coating, and sometimes I get crispy but soggy coating.
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Old 12-30-2009, 12:25 PM   #8
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When I am in the mood to do it right I break out my fryer. It regulates it own temp and I never overload it. You can do the same on the stove using a thermometer.

Controling the temp of the oil will get you better results. If the temp of the oil gets to low the water inside of what your frying will not try to escape. When this happens oil will start to come in.
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