"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-08-2008, 01:50 PM   #31
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Cottrell View Post
...Ukrainian cooking is that spices are very lightly used if at all. Salt and pepper...
You are very much so correct. Not only there were very little of any fancy spices, only if you were lucky enough to go to one of the southern republics or Georgia at least during the summer and there youíd pick up some spices. Otherwise it was salt and black pepper or red pepper (which I have no clue where it came from). As far as herbs go: dill and parsley and parsley root during the summer, maybe few other roots, i.e. horseradish and its leaves. Gosh I canít think of anything else. Bay leaves. Allspice, cloves. That is it. I canít remember anything else. People used a lot of leaves, like black currant leaves, sour cherry leaves. Sorel leaves, spinach was not popular at all. A dandelion leaves.

Even such simple things like bell peppers were brought in from Bulgaria or Hungry.

Not having any of the fancy herbs or spices however did not make the food tasty boring or tasteless. Ukrainian foods are really incredible and extremely versatile. For may-many ethnic foods there is something similar in Ukrainian cosine. I.e. won tons Ė pirogy (vareniki). Italian meatballs in tomato sauce Ė Ukrainian meatballs in meat sauce. Hamburger Ė kotlety. I canít think of anything else right now. You give me a name of food _ Iíll find something similar.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 02:25 PM   #32
Head Chef
 
David Cottrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Posts: 1,194
Way to go Charlie and everyone who has responded to this thread. This is great! I hope you don't mind a gringo like me chiming in from time to time. If you have the patience for it I could post Olga Bondar's awesome Spartacus cake (tort) - her family recipe named for a striped candy, Sparta, that was a childhood favorite of her's. She sent me some with a book she brought back from a recent trip back "home" to Kiev. I wrote the recipe for a non cook like me, especially a non baker, but I could shorten up a bit for those more experienced. I haven't met anyone who doesn't like it and I've made it about six times and shared widly.
__________________

__________________
David Cottrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 02:27 PM   #33
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Fire away. It doesn't have to be my recipes, it should be ukrainian recipes.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 02:38 PM   #34
Head Chef
 
David Cottrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Posts: 1,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
charlie, i was surprised to see that you bake your pirozhki/pierogi.

my mil always fried them, in lots of butter, with sweated onions.

they were traditionally served with sour cream, apple sauce, and either cold or hot red cabbage slaw.

my wife would love the idea of baked pirozhki, being the health nut she is, always on the lookout for fat/calorie reducing methods of cooking.

how do you serve yours?
Buckytom, I'm, wondering what would be most traditional - fried or baked. I'm going back to when those old large tile wood fired stoves/ovens were the standard, and are still in use. Would frying or baking be easier I wonder. You know the stoves - the one that the devil hid behind in Tolstoy's "How Much Land Does One Man Need?"

I have a YouTube link to a young lady cooking in her rural village kitchen that has that stove. I'll post the link if anyone would like for me to.
__________________
David Cottrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2008, 03:03 PM   #35
Head Chef
 
David Cottrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Posts: 1,194
While I'm here I might as well post the YouTube link to the village kitchen in Ukraine.
Hope it works for you. For folks like me who haven't been there and probably now (just got older today :) won't go on
Books by Volunteers who serve Ukraine Orphans are a carefully selected group of YouTube links to Ukraine, you might enjoy. Just click on the Ukraine Links tab and at the bottom of the first links page are links to the YouTube collections.
See you in cyber space! D
__________________
David Cottrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2008, 03:27 AM   #36
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,783
This is very similar to the way my (Hungarian) grandmother prepared pierogie. They were served with more sauteed onions, butter & sour cream.

__________________
*amy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2008, 04:24 AM   #37
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,575
Charlie D., what a great thread!! I forgot to tell you but my hubby and I made your borscht recipe and it was wonderful. Like you and your DW we had to compromise on the beets to potatos ratio---I like less beets he likes more and vice versa with potatos. I love Ukrainian food---they make the best soups!! :)
__________________
The only difference between a "cook" and a "Chef" is who cleans up the kitchen.
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 12:39 PM   #38
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Yes they sure do. Ukranians really know how to cook. They like to eat and they like to cook. People going to scream at me, but russians don't know how to cook period. Schee, yech, yuk.

I'm glad you liked the borscht. Did you make that special addition? The peppers?
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 01:55 PM   #39
Head Chef
 
David Cottrell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Posts: 1,194
Charlie! What are you trying to do - start WWWIII?? With the energy thing in Ukraine, NATO, and all that. You know as well as I do that the Russians claim all the good stuff! Surely they invented something good to eat, but being the younger brother to Ukraine maybe not. Oh my! I better go wash my mouth out with soap.
__________________
David Cottrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 02:51 PM   #40
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
That's the thing they do claim a lot. Like for example first airplane, first VCR, well the list is endless. I'm sure they had some good recipes alone the way. But there was a bigger, better, much tastier one in Ukraine. Russians just do not like eating as much as Ukrainians. That is of course doesn't say anything good about Ukrainians, because food is the only thing on their minds.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cabbage rolls, ukrainian

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.