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Old 02-20-2011, 11:13 PM   #71
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DW wants PC, will do it tomorow, I hope.
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Old 02-21-2011, 12:25 AM   #72
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Charlie mate I am 70% through this fantastic thread, the pickled toms is a must try in september.
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Old 02-21-2011, 10:55 AM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
Charlie mate I am 70% through this fantastic thread, the pickled toms is a must try in september.
I agree. I'm glad you bumped it, Charlie.
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Old 02-21-2011, 03:25 PM   #74
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As far as mixture to put into piroshky. Traditional are meat, potato, jam/preserves, farmer’s cheese, cabbage, split pea, green onion and egg mixture.
I like to prepare meat specifically for it, but have used plenty of leftovers. I’d collect leftovers meat. Sautee some onions, grind and mix all together. To stretch it you can add some cooked rice, or my grandma's favorite was hardboiled egg. Just make sure that whatever you decide to put in tastes good. Because it is going to make piroshky either taste good or not. Potato I boil in skin, peel add sauté onion, salt pepper to taste and grind thru the meat grinder. Mix well, you're good to go. Farmers cheese is though less common but doable. Just add some salt or sugar to the mixture; you can even add an egg to keep it more together. Cabbage. I stew the cabbage with salt and some pepper till it is soft and started to look somewhat brownish then it is ready to go. You can add some sour croute to fresh cabbage as you cook it, but not too much.
Split peas should be cooked to the consistency of porridge. Jam or preserves has to be nearly hard. I make special one just for that reason. I purposely over cook it so it becomes not hard, but for sure tough. Then it will not run out from the inside during cooking. And the last one I use is egg and green onion mixture. It is practically an omelet with chopped green onion. Again make it taste good. Sauté some onions add egg, let it set, cook till it is hard, but do not burn. Do not chop or anything, simply cut pieces of big or small enough to put inside the dough. You might need to sprinkle a little bit of flour on it because it is wet the dough is not going to want to close on you and might open up during frying. Same with cabbage.
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Old 02-21-2011, 04:19 PM   #75
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More possibilities than I thought!

Thanks Charlie, I got it!
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Old 02-23-2011, 02:03 PM   #76
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Solianka
is the meal in a bowl. A simplified version of more complex Russian recipe for Solianka.

Ingredients:

Crosscut shank with bone in - 3.5 - 4 lb

Large carrots, grated – 2

Parsnip, small to average, grated - 1

Large onion finely chopped – 1

Pickle, for G-ds sake use the dill not the vinegar pickle, I don’t know how people eat them anyway, large – 2

Olives, I mixed green and black chopped ones together – 1 cup
(My family doesn’t like olives, if you do - do not chop them at all)

Tomato sauce – 2 cans

Hot jalapeno pepper, chopped – 1

Sweet red pepper, chopped – 1

Garlic, freshly chopped – 2 cloves

Parsley, dill – about a pinch or more

Lemon, sliced, for serving - 1

Rise – 2 cups

Cold cuts, cut into small cubes or chopped anyway you like about – 2
Cups

Salt, pepper.

In the large pot cook beef or “the other white meat” (if you like) in about 6 quarts of water, cook uncut. Basically you need good meat base bullion. I use beef and I like to cook it for a long time to make sure the beef is very tender. I like to cook with some salt and freshly ground pepper. After water boils I clean the foam of the top and at that time add onion, carrots and parsnip. And let it simmer till ready. Take the meat out and let it cool. At that time add pickles, olives, tomato sauce or paste, you’ll just need less of it. Hot and sweet pepper and garlic. Let it cook for about 15-20 minutes add rice. Now, about the cold cuts. I keep the whole bunch of them already cut in the freezer. It could be anything, salami and bologna, ham and smoked turkey, leftover of some cooked chicken you had the other day, hotdogs and bratwurst, if you like kidneys and tongue it is even better. Just through all of them into the pot let it cook till they are hot (they really do not have to be cooked, as they are already cooked). When meat gets cold enough to handle cut it into small cubes and add back to soup, together with cold cuts. Taste and adjust for salt and pepper. Soup has to be spicy and with a hint of pickle. I prefer to use hot pepper to make it spicy rather than black pepper.
For serving you’ll need sour cream or mayo-lemon mixture. I like to mix a little bit of mayo with some lemon juice, add about a half of a teaspoon for a bowl of soup. Slice the lemon and hang a half of a slice on the side of the bowl. For those who will want the soup more tart they will squeeze the juice right into the bowl. Sprinkle some dill and parsley (for the smell) and serve. Now lets see if I can add a picture of it, I made the other day.
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Old 02-25-2011, 03:45 AM   #77
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Keep them coming Charlie, I am interested in how the Ukrainians make Beef Strog.
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Old 02-28-2011, 03:18 PM   #78
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Actually pretty much the same everybody else does. Meat, sour cream, noodles.
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Old 08-11-2011, 10:25 AM   #79
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Ok, I am trying to upload some pictures and as always I am having trouble.
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Old 08-11-2011, 10:40 AM   #80
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These are the pictures of meat filled pirozhki.
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