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Old 01-07-2019, 11:24 PM   #1
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Chicken Cafreal

Here is that dish again, posted in international, with the recipe, as you requested, msmofet.

This may be my favorite Indian chicken dish - this or Chicken 65, both loaded with garlic! Chicken cafreal is a Goan dish, influenced by the Portuguese (and visa-versa - probably why so much cilantro is used in Portuguese food!), when they occupied the small state of Goa, back in the days of the spice trades. Some of the spiciest foods, and also use a lot of vinegar, for their sour in the foods, though this also has tamarind. The foods of Goa are some of my favorites of Indian, along with those of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, due to all of the garlic and hot peppers!


Chicken Cafreal, start to finish. Recipe below the photos.

Spices for the green masala:
Spices for cafreal, before toasting. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Spices, after toasting:
Toasted spices, for chicken cafreal masala. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Cafreal masala paste, with spices, green chiles, ginger, garlic, cilantro, and salt:
Cafreal masala paste, to marinate the chicken. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Chicken, starting to cook after marinating 5 hours:
Chicken cafreal, starting to cook. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Chicken cafreal, after cooking about 20 min., before adding vinegar. Here, I sucked off 2 tb of the fat, with a baster:
Cafreal, after cooking about 20 min., before adding the vinegar. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Chicken cafreal, finished cooking, with most of the masala clinging to the chicken:
Cafreal, ready to serve. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Chicken cafreal, topped with crispy onions:
Chicken cafreal by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Chicken Cafreal

2-2 1/2 lbs dark meat chicken
1 tb tamarind pulp
8 tb warm water
1 large yellow or purple onion; sliced thin
7 tb vegetable oil; divided
1 tb Indian coriander seed
1 tsp cumin seeds, whole
5 cloves, whole
12 black peppercorns, whole
1 inch Cinnamon stick; broken up
1 tb white poppy seeds
5 cloves garlic; coarsely chopped
1 inch fresh ginger; sliced thin
5 serrano peppers; sliced (0.25 in)
3/4 cup cilantro (fresh); coarsely chopped
3/4 tsp ground turmeric
1 1/2 tsp Salt; OR to taste
3 tb white vinegar

A. First, set the tamarind to soak in the warm water - set it in, and massage it around with your fingers, and let it soak, while prepping the other ing. When soft, press it through a fine strainer, scraping the paste off of the bottom.

B. The chicken can be boneless/skinless, or thighs, chopped up into about 4 or 5 pieces, or drumsticks, chopped up into 2 or 3 pieces. Skin can be left on, but i took it off. Set pieces aside in a bowl.

C. Heat your toasting pan over medium high heat for a little over a minute, then add the coriander, cumin, cloves, peppercorns, cinnamon, and white poppy seeds. Toss for a minute, or a little longer, until spices are slightly darkened, and a wisp of smoke is coming from the pan. Pour into a bowl, to cool.

D. Prepare the fresh ingredients, while the spices are cooling. When cool, grind the spices in a wet dry grinder until finely ground (make sure the cinnamon pieces are gone). Add the fresh ingredients, turmeric, and salt, along with the turmeric pulp, and grind to a paste, scraping down the sides a few times. Scrape the paste into the chicken bowl, and mix well. Cover, and marinate 5-6 hours, or overnight.

E. Before starting to cook the chicken, heat up 4 tb of the oil in about a 9" saute pan over medium heat, and add the onions. Cook, stirring frequently, until caramelized and crispy, reducing the heat toward the end. Remove to a paper towel on a plate with a slotted spoon, and let drain.

F. When ready to cook, heat 3 tb oil in a 12" NS skillet, and add the chicken, placing the smaller pieces around the sides. After 6-7 min., turn the pieces (I use a plastic tong spatula), turning two more times. After about 20 min., tilt the pan and suck out the fat with a baster - a lot will be there, if the skin is left on, but not much if skinless/boneless). Then add the vinegar to the bottom of the pan, tilting it around, to contact the pieces. Cook 7 or 8 more minutes, turning the pieces frequently. The sauce should be pretty much cooked away by now, and clinging to the chicken.

G. Serve garnished with the crispy onions. (I deleted the onion photo - I was told that I was limited to 8 photos, even though there are only 8, and it took all 8 on another thread!)


Notes: If no wet/dry grinder is available, the spices can be ground in a regular spice grinder, then everything can be put into a small blender or the small container of a FP, to grind the fresh ingredients in with the spices.

Or, if you want a workout, all this can be done in a large mortar and pestle!

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Old 01-07-2019, 11:52 PM   #2
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Wow, pepp. That looks and sounds really freakin good.

I've always been so intimidated by Indian cooking because of the number and scarcity of the ingredients involved, plus my cheap side not wanting to buy much more of something that I figure will go to waste.

But I recognize and probably have most of the ingredients (some may be old, ...whatever), and I know I can get the rest. This is on my to do list for sure.

Isn't Goan cooking famous for seafood? I'd love some fishy recipes as my soul on winter longs to be out on a boat or on the shore with a tight line.
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Old 01-08-2019, 12:25 AM   #3
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Yes, bucky, Goa is definitely known for their seafoods. They also eat a lot of meats - also a Portuguese influence, who sort of brought it from Europe, and there aren't nearly as many vegetarians in Goa, as some of the other areas.

Funny thing - I used to not like Indian food, because so much of what I had tried almost always had a raw cinnamon flavor in it. Any food in restaurants was usually Northern Indian, at least around here, and all of the spice mixes, like garam masala, had untoasted spices in them. Only after I discovered the method of toasting the spices, did I like the food!

Getting into Indian cooking can be somewhat intimidating. I had to stock up on a lot of ingredients, even more than with the other oriental cuisines I got hooked on. The one thing different was there are less essential fresh ingredients, like all those herbs in Thai and other SE Asian cooking. The curry tree is the only thing that I had to grow, though I started growing that originally for Malaysian cooking, where they are influenced by many ethnic groups, including India.

Most of the spices I have for this Indian cooking I keep in small containers - some, like coriander, mustard seed, and cumin larger containers, but all the rest gets kept in vacuum packs, with oxygen adsorbent packs in them, in the freezer, if not often used, or the vacuum packs of larger spices get kept in a black tub in the basement. It keeps pretty much forever this way. The spice mixes I make in small amounts, except things like sambar masala, which I use a lot of.

Here's one of 4 boxes I keep of spices for Indian foods. I have another of the spice mixes, one of less used spices, and another with larger jars, like coriander. This is the one I grab the most:
DSCF0841_zps475194ad by pepperhead212, on Flickr

A few of these things I've actually had to order on ebay, from India! You can find them here, but they aren't the same. Can you tell I'm obsessed? lol
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Old 01-08-2019, 12:30 AM   #4
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Lol, umm,.. ... ... No. Not a bit.



Keep it coming. We feed on new culinary souls, er, I mean we appreciate people with excitement for cooking.
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Old 01-08-2019, 09:02 AM   #5
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Looks good! Since I have Indians as next door neighbors, I've been exposed to more of their foods. There is a significant Indian population here so I have my choice of Indian grocery stores. Their spices are MUCH cheaper than Penzeys.
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Old 01-08-2019, 10:04 AM   #6
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That looks delicious!!

And those ingredients are easy to find

Is Vindaloo a Goan preparation?
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Old 01-08-2019, 10:29 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
That looks delicious!!

And those ingredients are easy to find

Is Vindaloo a Goan preparation?
Yes. It's supposed to be one of the hotter dishes in Goan cuisine.
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Old 01-08-2019, 10:33 AM   #8
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Yes. It's supposed to be one of the hotter dishes in Goan cuisine.

Vindaloo is one of my very favorite Indian preparations.

You must have some Indian markets up by you, right?


There used to be one in Brookline but I'm not sure if its still there.
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Old 01-08-2019, 10:49 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
Vindaloo is one of my very favorite Indian preparations.

You must have some Indian markets up by you, right?


There used to be one in Brookline but I'm not sure if its still there.
There are several Indian markets near me. It's worth a visit just to go there and enjoy the aromas.

When my grandson was about 3-4 YO, we went to a spice store. The place was empty except for the family owners all lined up near the front, ready to serve you. When we walked in, Steven, in a loud enthusiastic voice, said "Yum yum!" as we were assailed by all the great smells. That brought big grins from all the folks in the place.
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Old 01-08-2019, 12:48 PM   #10
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Dave, first off, thank you for the Chicken Cafreal recipe, it looks and sounds delicious. Printed out, of course.

I am greatly impressed with the box of Most Used spices. You put me to shame. lol. I wrote them all down.

Do you have any Indian cookbooks? I have

"660 Curries" - Raghavan Iyer
"India's 500 Best Recipes" Shehzad Husain

I also have a 1" binder for India Spices and another binder for India recipes I have saved out of magazines and papers.

Would love to share.

P.S. Glad to see Turmeric in your Most Used box.
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Chicken Cafreal Here is that dish again, posted in international, with the recipe, as you requested, [B]msmofet[/B]. This may be my favorite Indian chicken dish - this or Chicken 65, both loaded with garlic! Chicken cafreal is a Goan dish, influenced by the Portuguese (and visa-versa - probably why so much cilantro is used in Portuguese food!), when they occupied the small state of Goa, back in the days of the spice trades. Some of the spiciest foods, and also use a lot of vinegar, for their sour in the foods, though this also has tamarind. The foods of Goa are some of my favorites of Indian, along with those of Kerala and Tamil Nadu, due to all of the garlic and hot peppers! Chicken Cafreal, start to finish. Recipe below the photos. Spices for the green masala: [url=https://flic.kr/p/2cFem7r][img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7889/45732564445_6a28137734_c.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/2cFem7r]Spices for cafreal, before toasting.[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/91097628@N06/]pepperhead212[/url], on Flickr Spices, after toasting: [url=https://flic.kr/p/RW28A1][img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4915/32772793048_0bf66ff0a3_c.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/RW28A1]Toasted spices, for chicken cafreal masala.[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/91097628@N06/]pepperhead212[/url], on Flickr Cafreal masala paste, with spices, green chiles, ginger, garlic, cilantro, and salt: [url=https://flic.kr/p/2e55fyF][img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4811/46647425951_1a38ed72be_c.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/2e55fyF]Cafreal masala paste, to marinate the chicken.[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/91097628@N06/]pepperhead212[/url], on Flickr Chicken, starting to cook after marinating 5 hours: [url=https://flic.kr/p/2cY2Si9][img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4862/45922705074_ae4e283deb_c.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/2cY2Si9]Chicken cafreal, starting to cook.[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/91097628@N06/]pepperhead212[/url], on Flickr Chicken cafreal, after cooking about 20 min., before adding vinegar. Here, I sucked off 2 tb of the fat, with a baster: [url=https://flic.kr/p/RW2rwb][img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7838/32772853378_e0b29d84cf_c.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/RW2rwb]Cafreal, after cooking about 20 min., before adding the vinegar.[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/91097628@N06/]pepperhead212[/url], on Flickr Chicken cafreal, finished cooking, with most of the masala clinging to the chicken: [url=https://flic.kr/p/2cFdEUZ][img]https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4876/45732432585_c8b53557c8_c.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/2cFdEUZ]Cafreal, ready to serve.[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/91097628@N06/]pepperhead212[/url], on Flickr Chicken cafreal, topped with crispy onions: [url=https://flic.kr/p/2e5s1AB][img]https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7825/46651671431_5b7a669709_c.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/2e5s1AB]Chicken cafreal[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/91097628@N06/]pepperhead212[/url], on Flickr [B]Chicken Cafreal [/B] 2-2 1/2 lbs dark meat chicken 1 tb tamarind pulp 8 tb warm water 1 large yellow or purple onion; sliced thin 7 tb vegetable oil; divided 1 tb Indian coriander seed 1 tsp cumin seeds, whole 5 cloves, whole 12 black peppercorns, whole 1 inch Cinnamon stick; broken up 1 tb white poppy seeds 5 cloves garlic; coarsely chopped 1 inch fresh ginger; sliced thin 5 serrano peppers; sliced (0.25 in) 3/4 cup cilantro (fresh); coarsely chopped 3/4 tsp ground turmeric 1 1/2 tsp Salt; OR to taste 3 tb white vinegar A. First, set the tamarind to soak in the warm water - set it in, and massage it around with your fingers, and let it soak, while prepping the other ing. When soft, press it through a fine strainer, scraping the paste off of the bottom. B. The chicken can be boneless/skinless, or thighs, chopped up into about 4 or 5 pieces, or drumsticks, chopped up into 2 or 3 pieces. Skin can be left on, but i took it off. Set pieces aside in a bowl. C. Heat your toasting pan over medium high heat for a little over a minute, then add the coriander, cumin, cloves, peppercorns, cinnamon, and white poppy seeds. Toss for a minute, or a little longer, until spices are slightly darkened, and a wisp of smoke is coming from the pan. Pour into a bowl, to cool. D. Prepare the fresh ingredients, while the spices are cooling. When cool, grind the spices in a wet dry grinder until finely ground (make sure the cinnamon pieces are gone). Add the fresh ingredients, turmeric, and salt, along with the turmeric pulp, and grind to a paste, scraping down the sides a few times. Scrape the paste into the chicken bowl, and mix well. Cover, and marinate 5-6 hours, or overnight. E. Before starting to cook the chicken, heat up 4 tb of the oil in about a 9" saute pan over medium heat, and add the onions. Cook, stirring frequently, until caramelized and crispy, reducing the heat toward the end. Remove to a paper towel on a plate with a slotted spoon, and let drain. F. When ready to cook, heat 3 tb oil in a 12" NS skillet, and add the chicken, placing the smaller pieces around the sides. After 6-7 min., turn the pieces (I use a plastic tong spatula), turning two more times. After about 20 min., tilt the pan and suck out the fat with a baster - a lot will be there, if the skin is left on, but not much if skinless/boneless). Then add the vinegar to the bottom of the pan, tilting it around, to contact the pieces. Cook 7 or 8 more minutes, turning the pieces frequently. The sauce should be pretty much cooked away by now, and clinging to the chicken. G. Serve garnished with the crispy onions. (I deleted the onion photo - I was told that I was limited to 8 photos, even though there are only 8, and it took all 8 on another thread!) Notes: If no wet/dry grinder is available, the spices can be ground in a regular spice grinder, then everything can be put into a small blender or the small container of a FP, to grind the fresh ingredients in with the spices. Or, if you want a workout, all this can be done in a large mortar and pestle!:ohmy: 3 stars 1 reviews
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