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Old 01-24-2006, 08:21 PM   #1
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Arrow Chicken Chow Mein

I'm looking for a good chicken chow mein receipe since I cannot find a restaurant in my area (Las Vegas) that serves it the way I'm grow to like it. I'm originally from Minneapolis, and there is a place called "Jin's Chow Mein" that serves the best chicken chow mein I have ever had. It consisted of white rice, celery sauce (this is the best way I can describe it-it's a real thick sauce with mostly celery) and crunchy noodles with little strips of chicken breast.

If anyone has a receipe for this, or can recommend a restaurant in the Las Vegas area that serves this, please reply.

Thanks in advance!

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Old 01-24-2006, 08:34 PM   #2
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Have you seen this thread yet, membrane?

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...cken+chow+mein

ps - welcome to discusscooking! We hope you stay around!
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Old 01-24-2006, 08:41 PM   #3
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This recipe is an exerpt from my cookbook "You Can Be A Great Cook With Poulty". Please honor the copyright.

Chicken Chow Mein/Chop Suey
The only difference between Chicken Chow Mein and Chop Suey is the addition of chow mein noodles. If you have them, the dish is chicken Chow mein. If not, it's Chop Suey. Either way, it was created in the United States, not China.
Ingredients:
Ingredients:
2 lbs. cut up frying chicken
1/4 cup diced onion
2 stalks celery, bias sliced (slice at an angle toward the ends from the
back of the arch to the ends)
1/2 tsp. salt
2 cups fresh bean sprouts.
2 tbs. Peanut oil
1 tsp. Accent flavoring (optional)

Skin and bone the chicken. Place the skin and bones in two cups of boiling water and cover. Turn heat down to simmer. Cut the chicken meat into 1/2" thick strips. Heat 2 tbs. of the peanut oil in a steel wok, or large heavy skillet (I prefer seasoned cast iron if I'm not using my wok). Add the chicken and half of the salt. Cover with a lid and cook for about seven minutes, stirring frequently. Remove the cooked chicken to a large bowl (very large) and pour any juices from the pan into the boiling chicken stock.
Return the wok to the stove and reheat. Add the onion, garlic, and celery and 2 tbs. of water. Cover and cook until the celery is tender-crisp. Remove and add to the chicken. Place 1 cup of the chicken stalk into the pan and add the bean sprouts. Cook on high for five minutes. Add the remaining ingredients to the bean sprouts and mix. Turn heat to simmer and cover the pan or wok. Stir 3 tsp. Corn starch into 4 tbs. water. Stir until lump free. Add the corn starch to the simmering pan and stir until a light gravy is formed. Mix the chicken and veggies together. Serve with rice and chow mein noodles.


Hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 01-24-2006, 09:09 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by membrane
. . Minneapolis . . . there is a place called "Jin's Chow Mein" that serves the best chicken chow mein I have ever had.
Donde esta? I'll have to go check it out. I'll see if they have anything with a recipe for you too if I go!
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Old 01-24-2006, 09:26 PM   #5
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Jin' sin Minneapolis is famous at least to those who grew up there. I know of a lady who carts the dish back to Calif. each year for a dinner party of transplants! really.

A good Cantonese/ Chinese-American restaurant will still serve it right. It is a classic...Chinese method, American ingredients dish. using celery for chinese cabbage or boc choy which was not available then (later 1800s)

It is difficult to get the Chinese taste at home without the intense heat of the real wok, and gas wok ring. But one can get pretty close.
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Old 01-24-2006, 09:45 PM   #6
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We've tried quite a few of the Chinese restaurants since we have moved to Vegas, and none of them came close to Jin's chicken chow mein. In fact, they were totally different dishes! It's been really surprising to me that the chow mein dishes in Vegas are so much different than that in Minneapolis.

The only thing I need the recipe for is the celery "sauce" (I'm sure I can figure out how to steam the rice ).
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Old 02-10-2006, 02:24 AM   #7
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Does anyone know how to make the celery "sauce" for chow mein?
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Old 02-21-2006, 06:22 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by membrane
Does anyone know how to make the celery "sauce" for chow mein?
I'm still looking for the right "celery sauce" for chow mein. It looks like a big pile of brownish-green goop with celery (nothing else really in it).
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Old 02-21-2006, 07:44 AM   #9
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I don't have a recipe but this is what I would do given your description of the dish, except that I didn't add rice here -- I've never encountered rice mixed in chowmein (which literall means stir-fried noodles in Chinese):

1. Saute some crushed garlic and onions.
2. Add chicken strips, soy sauce, oyster sauce, good chicken stock, then sliced carrots and chopped celery stems/leaves. (Add shrimps, pork strips and sliced chinese sausages for better taste. You can also add lots of chives.) Simmer until cooked and adjust seasonings to taste.
3. Ladle out all solids and enough liquid for topping noodles later. (You must have enough remaining stock simmering in your wok to be absorbed by the noodles.)
4. Add noodles until cooked. Place noodles in serving platter.
5. Return reserved toppings into wok and bring to a boil.
6. Add slurry of cornstarch while stirring. When cornstarch all cooked and combined and you get the right consistency of the topping liquid, pour everything over the noodles. Serve while hot.

Note: Use the best quality chowmein noodles you can find. It's flavor and texture adds greatly to the overall taste of the dish.

Good luck....
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Old 02-21-2006, 08:33 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by membrane
there is a place called "Jin's Chow Mein" that serves the best chicken chow mein I have ever had. It consisted of white rice, celery sauce (this is the best way I can describe it-it's a real thick sauce with mostly celery) and crunchy noodles with little strips of chicken breast.
Rice in chow mein?
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