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Old 12-09-2010, 06:54 PM   #1
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Here's my recipe. I started with an Epicurious.com recipe and tweaked it to our liking. This is enough for two.

Chinese Pepper Steak

8 Oz Flank Steak
4 tsp Dark Soy Sauce
Tb Cornstarch
1 Tb Chinese Rice Wine
2 tsp Garlic (use a rasp grater)
2 tsp Ginger (use a rasp grater)
tsp Salt
tsp Sugar
2 tsp Peanut Oil

1 Tb Ketchup
1 Tb Hoi sin sauce
2 tsp Chile Garlic Sauce

4 tsp Peanut Oil, divided
1 tsp Salt
1 Ea Bell Pepper, ” strips
C Beef Broth, optional
C Scallions, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 tsp Sesame Oil

Cut the steak with grain into 1 - 2-inch-wide strips. Cut each strip across grain into inch-thick slices.

Put the slices into a medium bowl with the soy sauce, cornstarch, rice wine, garlic, ginger, salt, sugar, and the oil and stir with a fork. Marinate, refrigerated, for at least 30 minutes and up to four hours.

Stir together the ketchup, hoi sin, and chile garlic sauce in a small bowl and set it aside.

Heat the wok over high heat. Pour 2 teaspoons oil down the side of the wok, then swirl the oil, tilting the wok to coat the sides. Add the salt and bell pepper. Stir-fry to cook the pepper. Remove to a plate.

Pour the remaining 2 teaspoons of the oil down the side of the wok over high heat, then swirl the oil, tilting wok to coat sides.

Add the beef, spreading pieces in one layer on the bottom and sides as quickly as possible.

Cook undisturbed, letting beef begin to brown, for 1 minute, then stir-fry until meat is just browned on all sides but still pink in center, about 1 minute.

Add the cooked peppers, the scallions, the beef with any juices and the ketchup mixture. Bring to a boil and stir-fry until well combined and heated through. If the sauce is too thick, use some or all of the broth to thin it. Conversely, if the sauce is too thin, simmer to thicken.

Toss with the sesame oil then transfer to a platter.
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Old 12-10-2010, 12:48 AM   #2
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This looks wonderful - thanks for posting :)
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Old 12-10-2010, 12:57 AM   #3
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Yum...copied and pasted! Thanks!
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Old 12-10-2010, 04:27 AM   #4
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Copied and pasted. I had to do the email trick so I could adjust font and font size. This one wouldn't paste into word, but did paste into an email message. It's okay, but my print has "Yahoo" plastered across the top.

Anyway, thanks for the recipe. Now that I have it printed out I can take the time to read it through. Looks really good.
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Old 12-17-2010, 05:48 PM   #5
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Where's the black pepper? That's the traditional pepper in this dish as bell peppers are New World foods. Sure, I enjoy the bells in the modern interpretation too, but a generous dose of black pepper is what sends this dish. A little Sichuan pepper is good in it too.

Most versions also include some onion beyond just the scallion.

The ketchup and hoisin sauce aren't standard either. If you like it that way, fine.

Technique wise, this is also a classic dish for the passing through oil technique. It's very difficult if not impossible to stir fry thin slices of beef to proper doneness evenly on all pieces, especially if you want some rareness left. So the meat is usually par-cooked/blanched in moderately hot oil first (as in a deep fry technique), then set aside to drain off excess oil. Then it is added to the vegies at the end just to come back up to temperature.

Certainly food can be cooked in many good ways. Just pointing out some diversions in the above recipe from what I would consider the standard treatment.
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:48 PM   #6
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While this wasn't the recipe you were expecting, I never said it was a black pepper dish. This is a pepper steak dish of the type found in Chinese restaurants across the US.

Perhaps if you did a search of Chinese recipe sites you will find the dish you are looking for.
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:52 PM   #7
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I don't really like black pepper so I wouldn't use it anyway.

I do like the rest of the ingredients.

I'm working on ideas for all the pork from the roast. The sherry/water braising liquid really cooked into the meat, and there is about a cup+ left of the liquid.

I bet some would be good as jerky/bbqy something.
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:59 PM   #8
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This is one of my favorite Chinese dishes. However, we have a Chinese restaurant about 2 blocks from here where we can get that and many other favorites cheaper and tastier than we can fix at home. I'm talking a big plate full, plus soup and an egg roll for about $6.
I don't know what's happened to me, but it seems like after I turned 60, I started getting lazy about cooking.
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Old 12-17-2010, 07:01 PM   #9
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Shoot, if I had access like that to good Chinese, I'd get lazy too.
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Old 12-17-2010, 11:25 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
Shoot, if I had access like that to good Chinese, I'd get lazy too.
Me, too!
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