"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-16-2005, 11:35 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
mudbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: NoVA, beyond the Beltway
Posts: 11,166
okey dokey Ron - you're on. We are going to have this tonight, along with Ishbel's orange marmalade bread and butter pudding.

I've also got a garden cucumber from the neighbors (I will be the only one here to eat it). How do you do your cucumber salad? sliced with sour cream and dill, or some other way?
__________________

__________________
Kool Aid - Think before you drink.
mudbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 12:02 PM   #12
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 27
Heading south....Serbian bean soup.

This is one of the glories of the Serbian kitchen, one that has sustained generations of Serbs for untiold generations.

1/2 lb. dried beans (I use small white beans, limas, navy beans, etc.)
2-3 raw carrots, peeled and shredded or cubed.
2-3 red potatoes , peeled and cut into squares about 2" in diameter.
2 stalks of celery, diced
1-1.5 lbs of smoked meat/sausage/hambone with meat attached. (If using sausage, cut into serving pieces; if using hambone, leave meat attached.)
4 quarts of cold water.
salt
pepper

Rinse dried bean, place in a large pot and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil. Stir occasionally to prevent beans from sticking. Salt to taste. Lower temperature and simmer until beans are almost tender (about an hour.).

Peel, cube and add veggies. Wash sausage/meat and add in suitable serving pieces about 2". If ham bone is used, or other smoked meat, add it at the beginning of the process when the beans are boiling. Continue simmering process until veggies and beans are completely cooked (another hour on slow simmer.) Ham bone may be removed at this point; cool and remove all meat from bone. Return meat to pot and discard teh bone.


[My observation: since meat may impart too smokey a flavor, you might want to boil it separately and add it back in to the cooking beans, later, having discarded the smokey water.]

"Zafrak," thickener for soup. This is what really makes the soup. This technique is used throughout Central and Eastern Europe, among other locations.

4 Tbsp. lard, bacon grease, Crisco or oil. [ I know that lard is out of favor, but it really makes a difference when you use it.]
4 Tbsp. flour
1 medium onion, chopped
1 Tbsp. sweet or medium paprika [Hungarian paprika comes in about 6 levels of heat.]

Add flour to hot melted grease, stir constantly over medium to low heat. Do NOT burn the flour. It must turn deep brown slowly and completely. Add chopped onion and saute to soft texture. Not necessary to brown onion. Remove from heat, add sweet/medium paprika [use an Eastern European one, not red American red paint dust!] and return to low heat until paprrika turns ingredients to a golden brown. Use approximately one cup of bean soup liquid to zafrik, stir and add to bean soup. Continue simmering soup until it is thickened, for another 5 minutes. Season to taste. This soup ages gracefully in the 'fridge:)

Enjoy!

P.S. when the carpenters are finished working in our house, I will unearth my Bulgarian recipes.

Ron
__________________

__________________
Ron Hay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 12:05 PM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 27
Hungarian cucumber salad

This may be found in just about any cuisine in Central Europe.

2 medium cukes
1/4 cup vinegar
1-1.5 tsp sugar
3/4 cup water
1 tsp. salt

All these measurements are approximate. Vary them according to your personal taste.

Ron
__________________
Ron Hay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 12:06 PM   #14
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudbug
I've also got a garden cucumber from the neighbors (I will be the only one here to eat it). How do you do your cucumber salad? sliced with sour cream and dill, or some other way?
You can do a cucumber tomato mix, chop both and pour red wine vinegar over it or Italian dressing. OR, cucumber radish with just plain vinegar. OR slice cucumbers and sprinkle with sugar, then pour vinegar over them.

Personally, I just add cucumbers to my green salad.
__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 12:09 PM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Being a true Hungarian here we always made our cucumbers with a mixture of sour cream (it's the Hungarian way), apple cider vinegar, sugar, salt, and lots of pepper - cucumbers sliced VERY thin.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 12:30 PM   #16
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 27
Varities of cucumber salads

Hello, again. This recipe was given to me by a professional cook from Hungary on another list. She is well-versed in all manner of Hungarian foods.

Lots of variation in recipes occur even within a given region, not to mention within a country, especially with an easily-grown item like cucumbers, which, are by nature, rather bland, admitting to a whole galaxy of culinary embellisments.

Every family may ring changes on a recipe, as well.

Ron
__________________
Ron Hay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 12:46 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Ron, to tell you the truth I didn't even look at the recipe until just now - I was just being a smart alek with Alix.

I learned a thing or two about different regions when I asked the owner of a local Italian restaurant if they would ever consider putting Panzanella Salad on their menu - the only Panzanella he knows of has potatoes in it and NOTHING like the tomato/bread salad that pretty much everyone else knows - he's never heard of it before! It's very facinating! It's facinating to see the different dishes that are made of truly local ingredients.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 03:11 PM   #18
Head Chef
 
Shunka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Arizona
Posts: 1,023
Ron, the bean soup recipe you posted is just like the one that my Grandmother would make. She was Cherokee but must have learned it from family friends growing up. She would also make up meals using saur-kraut that I am still trying to duplicate today. My son-in-law is Polish and even though my cabbage rolls are a bit different than what his mother made, he loves mine. Thank you for posting all of these recipes!!!
__________________
Shunka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 03:58 PM   #19
Executive Chef
 
Piccolina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 4,319
Send a message via AIM to Piccolina Send a message via MSN to Piccolina Send a message via Yahoo to Piccolina
Hi everyone,

Here are some very recipe-filled Czech cooking links:

http://goodfood.hypermart.net/czech_category.html

http://www.recipezaar.com/r/15/243

http://fooddownunder.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi?q=czech

http://www.texasczechs.homestead.com...ecipes3_10.htm

I can't say as though I've eaten much Czech food, but I have had a bit of Russian, which is typically the sort of soul-satisfying food you want when you feel empty to the bone.
__________________
Jessica

"The most indispensable ingredient of all good home cooking: love, for those you are cooking for" ~ Sophia Loren
Piccolina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2005, 05:45 PM   #20
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Gugelhupf

I found this recipe handwritten in the back of a friend's mother's recipe book...it must have been HER mother's book, because it is very old.


Gugelhupf
Recipe by Elain Fiala Karlousky

Ingredients:
1 cup butter
2 cups sugar
6 eggs, separated
1-1/2 cups sifted all purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder
6 tbl milk
flavoring*

Directions:
Cream butter to consistancy of mayonnaise. Add sugar slowly while continuing to cream. Beat until light and fluffy. Beat egg yolks in one at a time. Mix and sift flour, salt, and baking powder. Combine milk and flavoring. Add flour mixture and milk alternately to mixture, stirring in gently but thoroughly. Beat egg whites stiff but not dry. Fold in thoroughly. Spoon into well-greased 12 cup gugelhupf pan (Turk's head mold). Bake at 350 for about 1 hour & 10 minutes, or until cake tests done. Cool in pan 10 min. Loosen cake gently around rim of tube. Invert on cake rack. Finish cooling and dust with confectioner's sugar. Garnish with whole maraschino cherries if desired.

*for flavoring, use 1 tsp vanilla & 1/2 tsp almond extract, OR 2 tsp grated lemon peel.
__________________

__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.