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Old 12-26-2010, 02:23 AM   #1
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Danish Pork Roulade with Dried Fruit

I served this for my annual solstice dinner party. I made two 1 kg roulades for 10 people and had leftovers.

Six servings

1 kg pork flank, shoulder, or loin. See cutting directions below. It should be a shape that can be cut to a large rectangle.
100 g dried apricots
100 g prunes
1/2 l water
salt
pepper
1 vanilla bean
OR
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp ground cardomom, freshly ground, if possible
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
butcher's twine

1-2 star anise
OR
1/2 tsp ground anise, or whole or ground fennel
  • Soak the apricots and prunes separately until soft. They may take different amounts of time.
  • Drain the apricots and prunes and save the soaking water.
  • Cut the meat into a large rectangle.
  • Start at the long edge about 1/2 inch from the bottom.


Cut as straight as possible, staying at 1/2 inch from the bottom when you get near the end, fold it open and continue.



I hope that made sense. Have a look at the photos here: Picasa Web Albums - rullesteg/por...

Roll the meat up "empty" to make sure it will make a neat roulade. If necessary, trim some of the meat and add it where there is meat missing (If one side of the roll is thinner).
  • Mix the cardamom, nutmeg, and vanilla with the prunes and apricots. If using a vanilla bean, cut it in half and scrape out the the beans.
  • Put some salt and pepper on the meat.
  • Spread the fruit and spices over the meat.
  • Roll the meat from a short end.
  • Tie it with butcher's twine or fasten with poultry needles.
  • Put the meat in an oven proof pan, "seam" side down.
  • Add an inch or so of fruit soaking water and water to the pan.
  • Add the star anise, anise, or fennel to the water in the pan.
  • Put the pan in the middle of a cold oven.
  • Bake for approximately 1 1/2 hours at 180 degrees C (~350 degerees F).
  • Check if the meat is done by sticking a poultry needle into the meat. The juices should be clear.
  • Take the roulade out of the oven and let it rest for 20 minutes covered with foil.
  • Deglaze the pan and make a gravy or sauce.
  • Carefully remove the butcher's twine or poultry needles from the roulade.
  • Slice and serve.



1kg = 1 kilogram, approximately 2.2 pounds.
1l = 1 litre, approximately 1.1 U.S. liquid quarts
100 g = 100 grams, approx. 0.22 pounds, approx. 3.5 ounces

Note, tsp and tblsp are not the standard measures. They are the teaspoons and tablespoons found in your cutlery drawer

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Old 12-26-2010, 10:18 AM   #2
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That looks and sounds so GOOD! YUM.
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:26 AM   #3
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It looks fabulous!
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Old 12-19-2011, 11:22 PM   #4
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I made this dish for Solstice, again.

This time I used a single 2 kg piece of pork loin. I added 250 ml (just a smidgen more than a cup) of white wine to the fruit soaking water for braising. I used a bit less of the fruit soaking water. I used vanilla beans instead of vanilla extract. I put the empty vanilla bean pods in the braising liquid, along with the star anise.

I made the potatoes in a separate pan.

The pork was improved a bit by the use of the wine and possibly by the vanilla as bean instead of as extract. The potatoes weren't quite as good. The gravy was really, really good. I just deglazed the pan and degreased the pan juices, then heated with some corn starch that had been dissolved in cold water. I added a teensy bit of salt.

The timing was the same for the 2 kg chunk of meat as for the two 1 kg roasts.
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Old 12-20-2011, 08:25 AM   #5
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Yummm...I happen to have pork loin in the freezer that I cut that way so that I could make either porchetta or ?. I have dried apricots, all I need are the prunes!
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Old 12-20-2011, 08:27 AM   #6
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Nice one. Looks good and sounds like it would taste even better. I never really know what to do with larger cuts of pork loin. I find they can be fairly dry inside. I'm not a big sauce and gravy fan, so this is a nice way to add lots of flavor to the pork.

It goes on sale here often, so next time they do, I am going to do it this way. Thanks.
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Old 12-20-2011, 11:32 AM   #7
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Actually, I think I used 500 ml of white wine. The original recipe calls for 250 ml for the 1 kg piece of meat.
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Old 12-20-2011, 11:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Yummm...I happen to have pork loin in the freezer that I cut that way so that I could make either porchetta or ?. I have dried apricots, all I need are the prunes!
Have you thought of making Rullepølse - Danish spiced meat roll?
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Old 12-20-2011, 12:25 PM   #9
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Tax:Lady--that is on my list too--I just don't seem to have enough time to do all the things I want to do in the kitchen...funny how other things get in the way...
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Danish Pork Roulade with Dried Fruit I served this for my annual solstice dinner party. I made two 1 kg roulades for 10 people and had leftovers. Six servings 1 kg pork flank, shoulder, or loin. See cutting directions below. It should be a shape that can be cut to a large rectangle. 100 g dried apricots 100 g prunes 1/2 l water salt pepper 1 vanilla bean OR 1 tsp vanilla extract 1/2 tsp ground cardomom, freshly ground, if possible 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg butcher's twine 1-2 star anise OR 1/2 tsp ground anise, or whole or ground fennel [LIST] [*]Soak the apricots and prunes separately until soft. They may take different amounts of time. [*]Drain the apricots and prunes and save the soaking water. [*]Cut the meat into a large rectangle. [*]Start at the long edge about 1/2 inch from the bottom. [/LIST] [IMG]http://lh5.ggpht.com/_U40lSLlsmxs/TRbBMp4kEiI/AAAAAAAAIkE/KzCd7J0cRvM/s640/IMG_2352.JPG[/IMG] Cut as straight as possible, staying at 1/2 inch from the bottom when you get near the end, fold it open and continue. [IMG]http://lh3.ggpht.com/_U40lSLlsmxs/TRbBPOxc8nI/AAAAAAAAIkI/v6idC_gvKdw/s640/IMG_2354.JPG[/IMG] I hope that made sense. Have a look at the photos here: [url=http://picasaweb.google.com/taxlady/RullestegPorkRoulade?feat=directlink]Picasa Web Albums - rullesteg/por...[/url] Roll the meat up "empty" to make sure it will make a neat roulade. If necessary, trim some of the meat and add it where there is meat missing (If one side of the roll is thinner). [LIST] [*]Mix the cardamom, nutmeg, and vanilla with the prunes and apricots. If using a vanilla bean, cut it in half and scrape out the the beans. [*]Put some salt and pepper on the meat. [*]Spread the fruit and spices over the meat. [*]Roll the meat from a short end. [*]Tie it with butcher's twine or fasten with poultry needles. [*]Put the meat in an oven proof pan, "seam" side down. [*]Add an inch or so of fruit soaking water and water to the pan. [*]Add the star anise, anise, or fennel to the water in the pan. [*]Put the pan in the middle of a cold oven. [*]Bake for approximately 1 1/2 hours at 180 degrees C (~350 degerees F). [*]Check if the meat is done by sticking a poultry needle into the meat. The juices should be clear. [*]Take the roulade out of the oven and let it rest for 20 minutes covered with foil. [*]Deglaze the pan and make a gravy or sauce. [*]Carefully remove the butcher's twine or poultry needles from the roulade. [*]Slice and serve. [/LIST] [IMG]http://lh6.ggpht.com/_U40lSLlsmxs/TRbBi1PUG_I/AAAAAAAAIkk/6WbuN9wrUuo/s640/IMG_2384.JPG[/IMG] 1kg = 1 kilogram, approximately 2.2 pounds. 1l = 1 litre, approximately 1.1 U.S. liquid quarts 100 g = 100 grams, approx. 0.22 pounds, approx. 3.5 ounces Note, tsp and tblsp are not the standard measures. They are the teaspoons and tablespoons found in your cutlery drawer :wink: 3 stars 1 reviews
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