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Old 07-18-2007, 01:02 AM   #11
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Any Croatians out there? My Croatian grandparents passed away before I learned that I'm 1/2 Croat, and became interested in learning about where I came from. I don't recall very well what my grandmother used to cook, but I know it was definitely peasant-style food, except for her pastries. Man they were out of this world! She loved to make apple streudel and also these cookie-cakes that I think were made of layers of very thin sponge and chilled, like a petit fours almost.

One thing I remember well is that she started off every meal with a noodle soup. Very thin and tender noodles in what I think was a chicken-based broth. I remember the broth being clear though, so it must have been some sort of consomme? I don't know if this was a traditional dish, but I sure loved it.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:12 AM   #12
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I'm no Croat but concidering the fact that Croatia and other parts of EU were at some point the Austrian-Hungarian empire (geeeeez, how does that sound today?!), maybe some of the recipes I know would fit the bill.
Let me look.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:30 AM   #13
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[quote=college_cook]

One thing I remember well is that she started off every meal with a noodle soup. Very thin and tender noodles in what I think was a chicken-based broth. I remember the broth being clear though, so it must have been some sort of consomme? I don't know if this was a traditional dish, but I sure loved it.[/quote

It is a common thing in a lot of EU countries.
You start the meal with a "meat soup".
It could be meat or only bones or both.
That was the traditional Sunday lunch starter.
In most cases it is what they call a broth here.
You cook your meat (bones, both) with veggies like carrots, parsley roots,
some cabbage maybe, celery root, season with s $p and some marjoram, caraway seeds, paprika, add an onion cut into half and dry fried in a skillet with the cut side down (gives wonderful color and taste), in Hu maybe a cut up tomato and a pepper too, and simmer slowly for an hour at least.
You would skim the foam that comes to the surface at the beginning and wait patiently.
Once it is done you would cook some pasta (angel hair kind of stuff, but a bit thinner really, or farina dumplings or liver dumplings or other things) in the broth.
Then you would strain the broth and serve it for a first course with the pasta (or dumplings) in it.
Then you would serve the cookjed meat if that was the case, with the vegetables and some boiled potatoes and horseradish sauce on the side.
You would also serve the bone marrow!
Boy, what a delicasy!!
Just get it out of h bones on some hot toated bread, sprinkle a little salt on it and enjoy!
Geeeeez!!! Brings back memories!!
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Old 07-18-2007, 11:51 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by mitmondol
...Charlie how about more of the recipes?
... Please!
Tell me what you woul like or are interested in and i'll post the recipe, if I have one.
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Old 07-18-2007, 12:35 PM   #15
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Just generally interesting main courses that you would think deserve to be known about outside the specialised parametres of polish chefs.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:27 PM   #16
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i don't know anything about polish chefs, to be quite honest, i did not even understend what you just said, sorry, english is still my second lenguage.
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Old 07-18-2007, 01:36 PM   #17
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good maincourses where are you from originally
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Old 07-18-2007, 02:06 PM   #18
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My husband is paternally Slovene, maternally Slovak. When the iron curtain fell and we were allowed to travel freely, we were among the first to visit Slovenia (at the time, the only former Yugoslavian country that was NOT war torn). It was a wonderful couple of weeks spent in Ljublana, Metlika, Dolena Toplensk, Lake Bled, Koper, and Lipica (for those more in the know than I, please excuse spellings. I could go look it up, but am feeling lazy). We used mostly public transportation and met many wonderful people. The food was to die for. We ate many versions of schnitzel, many forms of goulash, more salads than I can mention, the best fried chicken ever, trout, shellfish. Hubby says, don't forget that great sausage. And now I'm remembering, pizza. (I'm using Amercan words for these dishes). The wonderful thing about Slovenia is that it borders on so many countries, and the cuisine reflects that. At that time Slovenia did not really "get" the idea of tourists, and 90% of their tourism was German.

Being Americans was a real novelty. Very few people we ran into spoke English (except for college and high school kids), and I don't think we met anyone who had ever met an American.

The food was extremely inexpensive and very high-quality.

My favorite wine was cvicek (svee-check) (a very dry, pink wine, served cold) and I came home with the limit.

I'll never understand how picky eaters, vegetarians, and people with strict dietary needs manage to travel, because we lunched at a lot of places where you just eat what they serve, period. It was always delicious, but often a version of roast pork.

I came home and experimented with versions of many meals we had on that trip. It was delicious.
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Old 07-19-2007, 02:56 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by nicklord1
good maincourses where are you from originally
I am originally from Kiev. What kind of main course are you interested in? There are so many. And most of them I probably do not have writen recipe, but I am willing to try to put one on paper, if you tell me at least type of meat you want. There is a stew recipe in my thread it is very much a good main coarse, and could be evn the whole diner too, just look it up.
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Old 07-29-2007, 12:19 PM   #20
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Eastern European

Are you considering the Balkans in this thread or do they have their own thread?
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