"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-12-2009, 01:16 AM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4
Shalinee, Help!! If you sprout your own Mung Beans could you advise how to easily remove the green seed coverings after the sprouts are ready. It's a lot of work to remove each tiny shell by hand.
__________________

__________________
yoddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 02:43 AM   #12
Senior Cook
 
shalinee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 170
Hi Yoddy, if you sprout the mung beans well, then the green skin should be easy to remove. Just put them in a basin of water. It will come loose and float to the surface. The you can scoop it off. Hope this helps.
__________________

__________________
shalinee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 02:57 AM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4
Tried that one yesterday but it didn't work well. The entire sprouts floated to the top, so I ended up removing them by hand. Will try it next time again. Thanks, Yoddy (ex.Irish now living in Israel).
__________________
yoddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 07:50 AM   #14
Senior Cook
 
shalinee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 170
Hi Yoddy, just wonder how you do the sprouting. I remembered many years ago I had to teach my students sprouting. We used guni sacks which was really excellent. The roots went through the guni sacks. The beans on top split as they germinate. When it's ready for harvesting, we opened up the guni sack and pull off the sprouts with our hands. The roots will break off. We then put them into a basin of water, gently stir it and the skin will come off. very little left that need to be hand picked. Using a sprouter is different. I can only guess that your sprouts did not germinate fully.
__________________
shalinee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 09:01 AM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4
Thank you for the info. I learned to sprout from a Philipino girl. They soak the beans in hot water for 60seconds. Rinse off and put on a wetted dishcloth and cover with another wetted dishcloth. Keep well moist, most of the sprouts were ready in 3days in this hot and humid atmosphere, but perhaps I didn't leave them long enough. Only my first try, so a little experimentation indicated. Rose.
__________________
yoddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 09:44 AM   #16
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by shalinee View Post
Yoddy, a lot of the Chinese or Malaysian dishes can freeze well. It depends on the types of dishes. In fact some dishes taste better after freezing. I often freeze mine. I have some Chinese recipes on my blog that can freeze well, for eg, the Chinese dumplings which is very easy to make. I learned from my Chinese friends to make and freeze them to save work. Anytime when you feel like eating, you just take out some and cook from frozen. Let me know if you need further help.

hey there. I just noticed this thread and reading your posts I thought
that maybe you could give me a pointer or two if you don't mind.
I love chicken with cashew nuts, but as you said every restaurant does
it differently and I've been trying to perfect my recipe to match the dish
a certain way. virtually every restaurant serves this dish in a heavy
soy sauce (thick, a bit too heavy-handed with the soy sauce) with
cooked chicken and a pile of carrots and celery in it. but the way I
first had it and used to eat it until about 5 years ago it was a totally
different style, with lightly breaded chicken pieces, a lighter sauce
and a garnish of cashew nuts and green onion. I have yet to even
come close to that and I have yet to find another restaurant that
serves it in this way. I MUST HAVE IT!!!!! any tips? also a
tip for chinese dumplings would be awesome.
thanks!
__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 03:51 PM   #17
Senior Cook
 
shalinee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 170
If you can let me know of the name of the dish, maybe I can help. There are a lot if vegetable cooked in soya sauce so I am not too sure which one you are talking about. There are 2 types of Chinese cooking...one from Hong Kong and one from China. So you will expect quite a big different in the style and the taste. You asked for tips about dumplings....to make or ways of cooking and eating them? My suggestion is still to get a good Chinese cookbook and try from there and make adjustments along the way. That's how I learn.
__________________
shalinee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 03:51 PM   #18
Head Chef
 
Scotch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California
Posts: 1,042
I'm not so sure that what you find in most Chinese restaurants in the U.S. really qualifies as "authentic." Many restaurants take great liberties with recipes, eliminating or substituting ingredients for the sake of efficiency and cost. Some seem to operate on the theory that Americans won't know the difference anyway, which results in many dishes that are practically indistinguishable one from the other. Moreover, what you now find in many of the popular chains, such as Panda Express, are overly sweet to appeal to the American palate.

If you want to make truly authentic Chinese recipes, you need to find a good English-language cookbook and have access to the proper ingredients. I suggest a small volume called The Good Food of Szechwan by Robert Delfs (long out of print but may be available through Amazon sellers or other good used book dealers) or either of the volumes by Fuchsia Dunlop, "Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook: Recipes from Hunan Province," or "Land of Plenty: A Treasury of Authentic Sichuan Cooking" (both available from Amazon).
__________________
Scotch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 04:08 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
shalinee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 170
My suggestion is to really go for the real Chinese cookbooks which are quite easily available and written both in mandarin and English. I find Wei-Chuang's cookbook very good. You can get them at Amazon.com. Do check that it's bilingual. I have been using them myself if I want to cook real Chinese dishes.
__________________
shalinee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 08:04 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Missouri
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by shalinee View Post
If you can let me know of the name of the dish, maybe I can help. There are a lot if vegetable cooked in soya sauce so I am not too sure which one you are talking about. There are 2 types of Chinese cooking...one from Hong Kong and one from China. So you will expect quite a big different in the style and the taste. You asked for tips about dumplings....to make or ways of cooking and eating them? My suggestion is still to get a good Chinese cookbook and try from there and make adjustments along the way. That's how I learn.

it's called cashew nut chicken or chicken with cashew nuts.
the primary ingredient in the sauce is soy and it is thick, like it
has a bit of cornstarch in it. I don't have a clue what else it
has - it is a bit salty.
and I was wondering about actually making the dumplings.
__________________

__________________
ellakav is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.