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Old 09-23-2007, 12:19 PM   #21
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Thanks, DavidC.-----I agree with you on wanting to learn how to cook the local cuisine of wherever you happen to land. If you have time, share also the title of your Ukrainian cookbook--maybe I can order a copy----there are several soup recipes that I have not been able to find online and maybe your book has them as well as pirogi recipes. Thanks for the site----it's amazing to see the similarities between Kazakhstan and the Ukraine. We had a musician come and play the dombra (stringed instrument) at our international last school last year. Our Kazakh and Russian students bring pirogies by the hundreds for lunch in the wintertime.
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Old 09-23-2007, 12:31 PM   #22
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Ukrainian Cookbooks

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Thanks, DavidC.-----I agree with you on wanting to learn how to cook the local cuisine of wherever you happen to land. If you have time, share also the title of your Ukrainian cookbook--maybe I can order a copy----there are several soup recipes that I have not been able to find online and maybe your book has them as well as pirogi recipes. Thanks for the site----it's amazing to see the similarities between Kazakhstan and the Ukraine. We had a musician come and play the dombra (stringed instrument) at our international last school last year. Our Kazakh and Russian students bring pirogies by the hundreds for lunch in the wintertime.
Here ya are! The Best of Ukrainian Cuisine expanded edition, paperback by Bohdan Zahny and Festive Ukrainian Cooking hardcover by Marta Pisetska Farley. I found both on Amazon.

Actually, I don't travel except in my kitchen where I fly off to anywhere in the world! Cheers

I should have said that The Best of Ukrainian Cusine has 29 soup recipes, counting borsch variations. Festive Ukrainian Cooking gives those little background paragraphs that I really appreciate.
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Old 09-23-2007, 01:18 PM   #23
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Ukrainian soups as well as pyrohies are the best food around.
Have to agree with you 100% here. Just made some last friday. And yes, wonton skins work really well, especialy the comercial ones, because they are thicker than the store bought ones.
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Old 09-23-2007, 01:22 PM   #24
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Indeed word "pirogy" comes from Polish. In main land Ukraine (if you can call it that) they are called Vareniki, but we had the whole discussion about that already ones.
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Old 09-23-2007, 01:35 PM   #25
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Indeed word "pirogy" comes from Polish. In main land Ukraine (if you can call it that) they are called Vareniki, but we had the whole discussion about that already ones.
Yep, we did. As I recall? Eastern European food. My Hungarian grandma made something similar, but w a different name - Kreplach.

Kreplach - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thanks for the thumbs up on won ton skins, charlie. They do make the process easier & pretty authentic tasting, IMO.
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Old 09-23-2007, 10:16 PM   #26
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I wonder---do you think it would be possible to roll out won ton skins just a bit more since the main complaint for some is they are a bit too thick? Since we can't get w.t. skins here I'm not able to test that idea out. I guess I would sprinkle a little flour on the work surface and a bit on the rolling pin and see what happens.

BTW David, thanks for the titles. Since I'll be back in TX in November I'll definitely look them up.

Hi, Charlie---what did you make---Borchst? Whenever my DH plants both feet here for more than a week I'm going to make a big pot of yours. Also do you have a recipe for "Solyankha" soup? (excuse the spelling)
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Old 09-24-2007, 08:01 PM   #27
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Won Ton sckins that are sold in the stores here are papper thin. Not sure who's complaining.
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Old 09-24-2007, 08:07 PM   #28
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Huh, do I have solyanka recipe? I make the best solyanka in the world! Period. Do you understand Russian, I'd send you recipe now. Otherwise Id have to translate into English.
In the mean time you could check this site out: http://www.russia-in-us.com/Cuisine/Dadiani/soups.htm#Miasnaia%20Solianka%20(Meat%20Soup%20Wit h%20Tomatoes,%20Onions%20and%20Cucumbers))
Russian Cuisine.

it desperatly needs bunch of cold cuts, but sounds ok otherwise.
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Old 09-24-2007, 08:16 PM   #29
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Thumbs up What good looking soups!

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Huh, do I have solyanka recipe? I make the best solyanka in the world! Period. Do you understand Russian, I'd send you recipe now. Otherwise Id have to translate into English.
In the mean time you could check this site out: http://www.russia-in-us.com/Cuisine/Dadiani/soups.htm#Miasnaia%20Solianka%20(Meat%20Soup%20Wit h%20Tomatoes,%20Onions%20and%20Cucumbers))
Russian Cuisine.

it desperatly needs bunch of cold cuts, but sounds ok otherwise.
Oh boy, I have learned when CharlieD speaks about East European food I listen, period dot.
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Old 09-30-2007, 08:49 PM   #30
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Neah, this is not merely a soup, it is The Soup! In fact it is the whole diner in one ball or is it bowl, darn, or is it bawl ...
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