"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-21-2004, 01:44 AM   #21
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,018
Could you get some curriwurst in there?

Lifter
__________________

__________________
Lifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2004, 03:12 AM   #22
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Virginia
Posts: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by aruzinsky
My German grandmother used to make this cake that sort of resembled a rectangular pizza with sliced plum wedges for topping. Sometimes peaches or apricots replaced the plums.
Kuchen! I grew up in Germany (Air Force brat), and I had German step-grandparents. My grandmother also made kuchen with plums, but also with apples or gooseberries. They were unbelievably delicious, especially with whipped cream. In those days the cream was heavy and thick and made up into whipped cream that was sold in paper cones from a dispenser -- the kind you see today dispensing milkshakes. It made you moan, it was so good. You didn't actually want to adulterate it with food.

What I remember from the German fairs I attended was bratwurst that they gave you with a broetchen and a dollop of hot mustard. The air was redolent with smoke from the bratwurst grills. I miss broetchen the most, but I'd give a lot to eat German bratwurst again. American bratwurst is unrecognizable to me. Nasty stuff. They also sold what they called Schaschlik. I was too young to know what it was, but it was heavenly. I've tried duplicating it since, with no luck. I suspect it may have been lamb. It was also grilled, chunks of very tender meat on a stick, with a unique flavor. FAB-ulous. I can close my eyes and taste it ...

You might think about elephant ears, too. I believe they are also called palmentiers ... ? Made with thin ropes of puff pastry and lightly glazed. A big deal when I was there.

Good luck! It sounds like a perfectly wonderful idea.


Cats
__________________

__________________
Catseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2004, 01:59 AM   #23
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Don't have a recipe to share, but can't resist because I'm an Air Force Brat who grew up partially in Germany with an 'adopted' Oma and Opa. Small world.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2004, 03:34 AM   #24
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Virginia
Posts: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
Don't have a recipe to share, but can't resist because I'm an Air Force Brat who grew up partially in Germany with an 'adopted' Oma and Opa. Small world.
Isn't it, though? Claire, did you go to the fairs? Do you remember an item called Schlaschlik, by any chance? I've given up, but for years I tried to duplicate it. What is referred to Shaschlik that I've been able to find here bears no resemblance.
__________________
Catseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2004, 07:29 AM   #25
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Germany
Posts: 10
Hi Catseye,

your recipe is actually called Schaschlik (with 'sch').
It's not really german but it's popular in
fast-food places.
I don't have a recipe at hand, all I found on german
cooking-forums was made with so called
schaschlik-sauce you can buy everywhere over here.

The meat on a stick is (called Schaschlik-Spiesse or Grill-Spiesse):
Lean Pork or Lean beef you can also use lamb
Bacon slices
Paprika slices
Onion slices
Just put everything on a stick. Be sure to put bacon next to the
beef so it doesn't get too drie.
Put it in oven about 30min.
Sometimes we marinate(right word?) with some ketchup, garlic,
oil (just like spare-ribs).

There is also another Schaschlik in a pot where the meat
is cooked in Schaschlik-Sauce. It is basically brown gravy with some
ketchup(or tomatos), paprika, pickles and onions added.

If you need any real german recipes let me know...

Greetings from germany(stuttgart)

madb
(please excuse the spelling/language, my english is getting worse everyday).
__________________
madb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2004, 08:22 AM   #26
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Virginia
Posts: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by madb
It's not really german but it's popular in
fast-food places. I don't have a recipe at hand, all I found on german
cooking-forums was made with so called
schaschlik-sauce you can buy everywhere over here.
Yeah, if memory serves the Schlaschlik I ate had a sorta Middle Eastern feel to it. But I was 9 years old, what did I know?

Do you know a website that might sell that Schlaschlik sauce? Or can you provide me the German word for it, then I can search it myself.

Thanks so much for your information, madb. And your English was fine. :)
__________________
Catseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2004, 08:34 AM   #27
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
Shashlik is a dish of Moghul or Persian origins. It then filtered to India and Pakistan and throughout Persia and the middle east - as far as Turkey and Greece.

Most of the above countries claim it for themselves - truth is, no-one is sure WHERE it originated 8)

Here's an award-winning chicken shashlik recipe from Bradford, the curry capital of the UK!
http://www.thisisbradford.co.uk/brad...er-recipe.html
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2004, 09:28 AM   #28
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Virginia
Posts: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
Shashlik is a dish of Moghul or Persian origins. It then filtered to India and Pakistan and throughout Persia and the middle east - as far as Turkey and Greece. Most of the above countries claim it for themselves - truth is, no-one is sure WHERE it originated
If I remember correctly, there were a lot of Turks living in the area, so that would make perfect sense, Ishbel.

Neither your nor Madb's recipe quite fits with what I remember. There was definitely no tomato. I just did a search for "shashlik" in Google, and actually, the following treatment feels the most familiar. (Grilling a must, preferably with a lot of smoke.) The Russian version appears to be the one that uses tomato.


Shashlik

5 tb olive oil
1/2 lemon; juice of
1-2 cloves garlic; crushed
2 lbs boned leg of lamb; cut into large cubes
1 salt and cayenne pepper

Mix the oil, lemon juice and crushed garlic together to make a marinade.
Stir in the meat, cover and chill in the refrigerator for 4-6 hours, turning
it over occasionally.

Thread the meat onto skewers and grill for 8-10 minutes, turning the skewers from time to time to brown the kebabs on all sides.

An extra 5 minutes cooking time may be needed if cooking on charcoal,
depending on the heat of the coals.

Brush the kebabs with the marinade occasionally while cooking.


Thanks, Ishbel!

Season and serve immediately.
__________________
Catseye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2004, 10:42 AM   #29
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Germany
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Catseye
Shashlik

5 tb olive oil
1/2 lemon; juice of
1-2 cloves garlic; crushed
2 lbs boned leg of lamb; cut into large cubes
1 salt and cayenne pepper
That's not referred to as Schaschlik normally.
It's just a "Grillspiess" ("grill - stick").
You can put anything on that stick you want and have
a nice BBQ.
Schaschlik would be:
- meat
- Onion
- paprika
- bacon

The marinade you described is also used very often
for BBQs (on "Grillspiesse" or on spare-ribs). It's
rather mediterranien kitchen, not german.

I like to add some fresh spices to that :
some fresh rosemary and thyme.
Also some fresh ginger cut very small.
You should also never crush garlic, just cut
it into really thin slices.
Don't use too much cayenne, it's going to burn.

Best dip for the above would be a greek Tzatziki.
I think thats common in the US (?).

For the Schaschlik-Sauce:
It's simply spiced ketchup with onions, paprika, pickles and tomato
chunks.
The german name is: "Schaschlik Sauce" (same in english).
There's even one made by Heinz. I don't know whether it's
sold in the US.


Greetings
madB
__________________
madb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2005, 11:59 PM   #30
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Australia
Posts: 46
I have also heard of Monster Ears I think?

We are able to buy in our town in Australia sauerkraut that is imported from Austria I think, it is very nice. It comes in a bag, maybe you can buy Seeberger sauerkraut somewhere?
__________________

__________________
Kabana&Cheese is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Food Oriented Charity Claire Today's Menu 10 12-05-2004 09:06 PM
New Food Magazine PA Baker Cookbooks, Software etc. 5 11-23-2004 10:18 AM
how often do you go food shopping, and where? buckytom Today's Menu 36 11-10-2004 05:38 PM
What's your favorite Fair Food? AllenOK Today's Menu 30 10-02-2004 05:46 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.