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Old 05-02-2006, 07:07 PM   #11
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Thanks Ishbel, was sure you would be here.

Absolutely agree, without the 'lights' it just does not the same.

On this side of the pond folks try to make a version of it, and it is generally, sorry read that always, a dismal failure.


We would try to make it if we could purchase the ingredients, but unfortunately the organs are hard to find.

And the lungs are prohibited here, so we could only make it if we could grow our own sheep, which we cannot do where we live.

Always enjoy the haggis. Are planning our next trip to Scotland.

Usually grab at least one haggis lunch at the Last Drop in the Grassmarket in Edinburgh.

One of these days would love to have a proper haggis at a Robert Burns dinner.

Maybe one of these days we can.

Take care.
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Old 05-02-2006, 09:01 PM   #12
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the only american haggis I had was tasteless mush...the lamb was not well seasoned and probably too young...the oats were not steel cut pinhead but american rolled (does not work!) and the steaming was not done at a rolling boil but by some other gelatinous way. very disappointing (I also think it was almost liver free...no way...this is something of a pate!) So yes my next UK trip will include at least a stop in Durham if not North of the Border for a proper bit of gastronomy! and a wee dram of the malt
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Old 05-03-2006, 03:45 AM   #13
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I attended a Burns' Supper on one of my visits to the USA. It was supposed to be a real treat for someone from Scotland, or so my hosts assured me..... It wasn't! It was tinned haggis (blech!) - tired bashed neeps an watery chappit tatties... I have come to the conclusion that haggis, like many 'ethnic' dishes, is best eaten in the country of origin
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Old 05-03-2006, 09:29 AM   #14
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I believe there are chefs and home cooks in this country that could do the dish justice, but the ingredients would have to be home raised or imported.

As you mention country of origin...even Tea, the quality of American water is quite different from the UK, the fact that most of the time we don't scald the pot or have the tea loose with BOILING water poured over it...even our milk is different and does no justice to this beverage. I make a dang fine cuppa at home but cannot order it out.
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Old 05-03-2006, 09:33 AM   #15
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I first visited the USA about 30 years ago... imagine trying to get British style tea all that time ago! Lukewarm water with a teabag with a string... I always use loose tea, scald the pot, a spoonful of tea for each person plus 'one for the pot'...

I know what you mean about quality of water - even within the UK... we have naturally 'soft' water, but in the South of England, the water is very 'hard' and the limescale buildup in kettles is awful. Makes the tea taste odd, too!
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Old 05-03-2006, 11:35 AM   #16
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Well then, I guess I'll just have to take a trip over to Scotland one of these days to try some real haggis. The stuff i've tried here in the states tastes mosly like liver.
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Old 05-03-2006, 11:51 AM   #17
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"tastes mosly like liver"

yes that will be a predominant taste. On the east coast Mid Atlantic region we have scrapple a breakfast item made from pork scraps and liver, corn and whole wheat meal, broth from boiling the head, and fat. It is fried. It is a normal PA NJ DE farm country thing. I love it. It is a breakfast Pate. great with eggs ssu, and fried potatoes and onion.

Many Brits love grilled Kidneys with their eggs, or kippers (smoked herings)
These are traditional "stong flavored" foods.

But a good haggis has a blend of flavors, texture, subtle depth, and will accompany vegetables, condiments, without loosing itself.

Personally, I would like to have it with deep greens sauteed, mustard vinaigrette, beans cooked in garlic, stock, and tomato. However, where I've had it, mmore ordinary components were provided...some of which I didn't think were appropriate (Pub sauce, Worcestershire, Catsup, Colemans, Horseraddish.)

THe Alton Brown recipe is quite good if you can get the ingredients...look for a good butcher.
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Old 05-03-2006, 05:33 PM   #18
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Traditionally, haggis is served with mashed swede (lot of pepper and butter) and creamed potatoes. At Burns' suppers, the haggis is piped in and then ceremoniously 'stabbed' with a sgian dubh and a glass of malt whisky anoints the haggis.
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Old 05-03-2006, 07:24 PM   #19
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"a liver sausage, golden turnips and creamy potatoes. " truly not a bad mix you know.
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Old 05-04-2006, 03:16 AM   #20
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Food fit for heroes, if cooked correctly!
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