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Old 05-02-2006, 11:20 AM   #1
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Haggis Recipe

Does anyone know how to make Haggis?
I've heard its like Meatloaf in the states in that everyone's Grandma has a diffrent recipe..

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Old 05-02-2006, 11:27 AM   #2
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It is a great lamb "sausage or meatloaf" the grain binder is oats (sometimes barley) it is steamed in a sheeps tummy. A good one is quite fine and being American, it is great fried like a sausage pattie or slice of scrapple. (The UKers would call that grilled). THe spicing is different than what Americans are used to, but then again we find Brit sausages different. Still very tasty once you are no longer "culture shocked" by it.

Origins are Roman, proof is in AEpicius' Cooking in Imperial Rome, (they'd stuff anything anywhere and cook it up) but the recent 1700+ years of its existance and perfection is Scottish. Are there various recipes? you bet...just like any regional and national dish.

Let's see if our Scottish members reply with some good ones.
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Old 05-02-2006, 11:27 AM   #3
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I don't know how to make it, but hopefully someone else here will know and be able to answer for ya.

Do you actually *like* haggis or do you just want to try making it for novelty purposes? (hopefully if you do attempt to make it you'll leave out the sheep stomach! Ick...... )
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Old 05-02-2006, 11:36 AM   #4
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it's cooked in the sheep's stomach, you don't eat the sheep's stomach. that "casing" is removed.
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Old 05-02-2006, 11:45 AM   #5
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From Alton Brown at FoodNetwork

1 sheep stomach
1 sheep liver
1 sheep heart
1 sheep tongue
1/2 pound suet, minced
3 medium onions, minced
1/2 pound dry oats, toasted
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried ground herbs

Rinse the stomach thoroughly and soak overnight in cold salted water.
Rinse the liver, heart, and tongue. In a large pot of boiling, salted water, cook these parts over medium heat for 2 hours. Remove and mince. Remove any gristle or skin and discard.
In a large bowl, combine the minced liver, heart, tongue, suet, onions, and toasted oats. Season with salt, pepper, and dried herbs. Moisten with some of the cooking water so the mixture binds. Remove the stomach from the cold salted water and fill 2/3 with the mixture. Sew or tie the stomach closed. Use a turning fork to pierce the stomach several times. This will prevent the haggis from bursting.
In a large pot of boiling water, gently place the filled stomach, being careful not to splash. Cook over high heat for 3 hours.
[slice to serve...casing not usually eaten]Serve with mashed potatoes [mixed with peas or cabbage]
[I like it best pan fried in fat (lard or bacon fat)]
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Old 05-02-2006, 12:09 PM   #6
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Robo (and Alton) have almost nailed it, although I am not used to the tongue being used.

The traditional recipe, and I could dig it out but my Scottish recipes are a bit buried, always uses lung, an organ meat we cannot buy in the US.

Actually it is a tasty dish.

We took my fil to Edinburgh and fed him the stuff for lunch, he knew what was in it, and OK, we were in a pub with a bit of liquid courage in us.

When we walked out he asked to return the next day, which of course we did.

Am sure some of our UK friends (including, needless to say, Haggis) will be dropping by with their great suggestions.
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Old 05-02-2006, 12:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grumblebee

Do you actually *like* haggis or do you just want to try making it for novelty purposes? (hopefully if you do attempt to make it you'll leave out the sheep stomach! Ick...... )
Of course I like haggis.. Doesn't everybody? Haggis is nothing compared to the interesting ethnic foods that I've tried before.
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Old 05-02-2006, 04:54 PM   #8
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Haggis (from A Feast of Scotland, Janet Warren)

Stomach bag and pluck (heart, liver and lights of a sheep --
you can substitute a selection of organ meats)
2 onions, peeled
2 c pinhead oatmeal (Irish oatmeal)
1 2/3 c suet
salt & pepper
trussing needle and fine string
Thoroughly wash the stomach bag in cold water. Turn it inside out and scald it, then scrape the surface with a knife. Soak it in cold salted water overnight. Next day remove the bag from the water and leave it on one side while preparing the filling. Wash the pluck. Put it into a pan, with the windpipe hanging over the side into a bowl, to let out any impurities. Cover the pluck with cold water, add 1 teaspoon of salt and bring the water to a boil. Skim the surface, then simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Meanwhile parboil the onions, drain, reserving the liquid, and chop them roughly. Also toast the pinhead oatmeal until golden brown. Drain the pluck when ready and cut away the windpipe and any excess gristle. Mince half the liver with all the heart and lights, then stir in the shredded suet, the toasted oatmeal and the onions. Season well with salt and pepper. Moisten with as much of the onion or pluck water as necessary to make the mixture soft. With the rough surface of the bag outside fill it just over half full, the oatmeal will swell during cooking, and sew the ends together with the trussing needle and fine string. Prick the bag in places with the needle. Place the haggis on and enamel plate and put it into a pan of boiling water. Cover the pan and cook for about 3 hours, adding more boiling water when necessary to keep the haggis covered.

I do not like Haggis but this is a good recipe. I do not find it very tasty.... needs some garlic and herbs... but that is not authentic so... Have at it and tell us which recipe you used.
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Old 05-02-2006, 05:01 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410
it's cooked in the sheep's stomach, you don't eat the sheep's stomach. that "casing" is removed.
Oh I know you dont eat the casing! LOL. I just find it rather disconcerting. I know they must be cleaned thoroughly, but still... i dont want to eat out of an animal's tummy.
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Old 05-02-2006, 05:18 PM   #10
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Without the lungs and other 'lights' - you cannot possibly make a 'real' haggis.

Have a look at the MacSween site - they make the very best commercially produced haggis - and also make a vegetarian version.

I'm lucky, my local butcher makes his own version... but he won't part with the recipe.

http://www.macsween.co.uk/
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