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Old 09-20-2008, 11:11 PM   #1
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HELP how to make Polish caldones (or Kalduny or Kolduny)

does anybody out there know how to make the Polish recipe of caldones. It's like a meatball in dough, not a calzone. My husband swears there are certain ingredients for the meatballs besides just hamburger.

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Old 09-20-2008, 11:39 PM   #2
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Do you mean Calzones?
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Old 09-20-2008, 11:40 PM   #3
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Sorry didn't read well enough!
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Old 09-21-2008, 01:44 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by slgraham View Post
does anybody out there know how to make the Polish recipe of caldones. It's like a meatball in dough, not a calzone. My husband swears there are certain ingredients for the meatballs besides just hamburger.
I can't find a Polish translation for "caldones". I know that meatballs in Polish cooking can contain one or more combinations of such ingredients as: mashed potatoes, cabbage, sauerkraut, onion, cheese, bread crumbs, etc. ...

When you say "meatball in dough" - is that boiled, baked or fried - or boiled and then pan fried? Is this something like a meat Pierogi?
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Old 09-21-2008, 06:40 AM   #5
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Do you mean "kolduny ( kalduny)"?

Kalduny - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I have a friend from Poland who brought me back a cookbook when she visited, and it has a few pages of recipes for them.

the dough is flour, egg, water and salt

The fillings vary

1)mutton,beef,garlic, marjoram, s&p, sugar

2)mushrooms, onions, smoked ham, hard boiled eggs, s&p , butter

3)beef, marrow, onion, butter, marjoram, s&p

4) herring fillets,milk, mushrooms, onions, butter , parsley , s&p
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Old 09-21-2008, 07:41 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Do you mean "kolduny ( kalduny)"?

Kalduny - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I have a friend from Poland who brought me back a cookbook when she visited, and it has a few pages of recipes for them.

the dough is flour, egg, water and salt
I think that is it. We have something similiar in Lithuanian cooking called a Virtini. It is a meatfilled pastry that is boiled. This is my Gram's recipe for them I am sure this is what you are looking for. There are similiar recipes between the two nationalities.

Pastry:

3 Cups flour
1 tsp salt
1 egg
1/4 cup crisco
warm water

Place the egg in a cup, beat it, add enough water to make 1 cup of liquid and stir. Mix four and salt in a large bowl, add the crisco and use your fingers to work it into the flour. Add the liquid and mix to combine. Put dough on a floured surface and kneed for 5 minutes. Place in a clean bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 10-15 minutes.

Filling:

2 lbs ground beef
1 egg
1 mediun onion
salt and pepper.

Beat the egg and pour into a large bowl with the beef. Grate the onion over the beef and add salt and pepper. Mix to combine well.

Cut the dough into small sections for easier handling. Roll out about 1/8 inch thick. Cut into circles with a floured drinking glass. Place about a ball of the filling to one side of the pastry circle, brush the dough edge with water, fold over and crimp with a fork to seal. Place on a parchment or waxpaper lined baking sheet.

To cook:

Bring a LARGE pot of water toa boil. Drop a few at a time into the boiling water and cook for 10-15 minutes. Drain.

If you want to you can then fry them in some rendred salt-pork one they are drained.

If these don't quite match what your hunband remembers try the following: use mixture of beef/pork/veal instead of just beef; soak some torn white bead in a little milk and add that to the beef mixture.
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Old 10-11-2008, 03:51 PM   #7
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I saw this post and thought I would respond...this is the way my grandmother makes them (I happen to be making them now and took a break from kneading to let my hand rest....)

2-3 cups of flour
1 egg
tsp salt
water (you just have to judge it...i'm not so good at it, but probably about 1/3 cup)

the trick is to knead the dough for about 15-20 minutes until its forms a ball, and pops right up when punched down on the center....

filling:
2-3 lbs ground beef 20/80 (the extra fat helps them hold together)
1 cup beef bullion (prepared and cooled)
salt and pepper to taste (be careful with the salt b/c the bullion adds alot)
marjoram to taste (I use about 2 T if fresh, 1 if dried...but my family loves marjoram, so you'll have to adjust to your taste)
1 med. onion, chapped fine or grated.

once the filling and the dough are done, roll out the dough on a floured surface, cut out in large circles (I use a pint glass), fill with dough, fold over and crimp the edges. lay them out on a sheet pan covered with waxed paper and freeze at least 30 minutes (it keeps them from falling apart when you cook them).
After they've frozen, you can boil them in anything you like, we use beef bullion...just drop them into boiling liquid and cook for about 10 minutes, they will float when they are done.
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Old 10-11-2008, 04:20 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goddard79 View Post
I saw this post and thought I would respond...this is the way my grandmother makes them (I happen to be making them now and took a break from kneading to let my hand rest....)

2-3 cups of flour
1 egg
tsp salt
water (you just have to judge it...i'm not so good at it, but probably about 1/3 cup)

the trick is to knead the dough for about 15-20 minutes until its forms a ball, and pops right up when punched down on the center....

filling:
2-3 lbs ground beef 20/80 (the extra fat helps them hold together)
1 cup beef bullion (prepared and cooled)
salt and pepper to taste (be careful with the salt b/c the bullion adds alot)
marjoram to taste (I use about 2 T if fresh, 1 if dried...but my family loves marjoram, so you'll have to adjust to your taste)
1 med. onion, chapped fine or grated.

once the filling and the dough are done, roll out the dough on a floured surface, cut out in large circles (I use a pint glass), fill with dough, fold over and crimp the edges. lay them out on a sheet pan covered with waxed paper and freeze at least 30 minutes (it keeps them from falling apart when you cook them).
After they've frozen, you can boil them in anything you like, we use beef bullion...just drop them into boiling liquid and cook for about 10 minutes, they will float when they are done.
Adding egg helps bind the filling. Adding bread or breadcrummbs can make the filling less dense.
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Old 10-14-2008, 04:33 AM   #9
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In many stuffed applications, the meat is a combination of ground beef, pork, and veal. If you remember it as being spicy, onion, garlic and paprika (sweet or hot, depending upon your taste). An egg to bind it, maybe some break or cracker crumbs.
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