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Old 07-10-2016, 08:59 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Yep and they are very good.

There are also Roman semolina gnocchi, which are very good as well. Darn it Andy! We haven't made these in ages. You just had to remind me. These are made by making a semolina "porridge" and adding butter, eggs, cheese, spreading it out flat, letting it cool, then cutting it into rounds and shingle-ing them in a baking dish, drizzling with butter, sprinkling with parm and then baking. They were probably the original gnocchi since potatoes are from the New World. They have a sort of nutty flavor from the semolina flour.

Also, don't know if you noticed or not, but I made gnocchi a few days ago with butternut squash puree and potato. As I wrote, I didn't really taste the butternut squash in them, though Craig said he did in the background. You could use pumpkin, which I feel has a stronger flavor, and do the same thing.
I did notice the squash gnocchi. I don't make gnocchi often. It's not a favorite of SO's. I learned to make ricotta gnocchi from an old girl friend. She used a one pound tub of ricotta, an equal amount of flour and an egg.
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Old 07-10-2016, 12:33 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Also, don't know if you noticed or not, but I made gnocchi a few days ago with butternut squash puree and potato. As I wrote, I didn't really taste the butternut squash in them, though Craig said he did in the background. You could use pumpkin, which I feel has a stronger flavor, and do the same thing.
I love the taste of squash, but it is timid. Did you roast the squash before pureeing? I haven't tried making gnocchi with anything quite that watery: wasn't it quite a challenge?
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Old 07-10-2016, 01:24 PM   #13
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No. It was roasted, then pureed, then back into saucepan over med heat, stirring nearly constantly until dried out, starting to stick, about 5 to 7 minutes. Cooled before using.

Another way to get rid of a huge amount of excess water content in butternut squash, without any work, l discovered quite by accident years ago. I roasted and pureed it, then had something come up so no time to make ravioli that evening. I plopped the squash puree in a single ply paper towel lined mesh colander, it already had S and P in it. Next morning, there was a huge amount of liquid in the container. Lucky thing I used a good sized container, would have had a mess otherwise.
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Old 03-24-2018, 11:18 AM   #14
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Re-upping this to add, the last few times I have made gnocchi, we only had older baking potatoes that had just started to sprout. They made the best, lightest gnocchi I've ever made, and I didn't change anything other than using the older potatoes.
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Old 03-24-2018, 11:25 AM   #15
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Old 03-24-2018, 01:36 PM   #16
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This is my recipe for gnocchi di patate:

1 Kg potatoes, of the floury kind, i.e. not new potatoes, and with a fairly tough skin. I use red potatoes, not new but old, not too floury.

then 600 g. plain white strong flour, 120g butter, salt & pepper and a pinch of nutmeg. 20 g parmigiano.

The main trick is to boil the potatoes skin on. Weigh a kg potatoes, plus one extra. The skin should not burst. After 20 mins cooking, remove the extra potato, cut it in half to see whether the potatoes are properly cooked, i.e if you see that the middle of the potato isn't quite cooked through, calculate, cook a little bit more, then remove the other potatoes, and sking them while while still hot. Now peel the potatoes while still hot, and keep them hot. Now add the other ingredients plus 1 egg - don't add any flour just yet. Mash the potatoes and then add the flour, working the resultant dough, and work it quickly. Next, take pieces of dough and roll them into 'sausages', and having done that, cut into small pieces - about the size of a thumbnail , and then make make an indentation so that when the gnocchi are finally cooked they have are ready to finish the dish, which is generally a meat ragł (let me know if you want the recipe). I like these gnocchi not only with a meat ragł, but also with butter and parmesan.


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Old 03-24-2018, 01:49 PM   #17
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I find boiling then, even in the skins, makes the potatoes too moist, which means you have to add flour, which means lead sinkers.
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Old 03-24-2018, 05:03 PM   #18
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Not necessarly at all. The secret lies in the quality of potatoes you use, and whether you cook them properly - and then whether the potatoes you get over there give the same results. I would be interested to know what quality of potatoes you use - and also, gnocchi do require flour in the mix - you can work it out for yourself. I don't think that the potatoes you use over there can get round that! I have used this recipe for years without problems, and because it works well, I wanted to share it with you.

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Old 03-24-2018, 08:22 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
Not necessarly at all. The secret lies in the quality of potatoes you use, and whether you cook them properly - and then whether the potatoes you get over there give the same results. I would be interested to know what quality of potatoes you use - and also, gnocchi do require flour in the mix - you can work it out for yourself. I don't think that the potatoes you use over there can get round that! I have used this recipe for years without problems, and because it works well, I wanted to share it with you.

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I never implied or wrote that gnocchi didn't need flour, perhaps you need to re-read or perhaps even read to begin with my tutorial before making incorrect comments. What I did write was the more moisture you add, the more flour it takes to make a stable dough. If you use water to cook the potatoes, you ARE adding additional moisture, no ifs, ands, or buts! I would also remind you that potatoes come from the new world, not Europe, not Italy. We get potatoes that are used for bakers in high-end steakhouses.


I've used my method of baking for years as well and I won't be changing for something that I know from experience makes an inferior product, since that's the way I used to cook the potatoes before getting tips from this very nice Italian lady. The lightness of my gnocchi improved 1000% since I started baking them. Perhaps you should give it a try before putting down my method, which many chefs also use.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:38 AM   #20
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My post was never intended to be a put down. I NEVER intend to do that, and I'm very sorry you thought I did - I just intended to share my recipe with you. Actually, it wasn't 'my' recipe: it was passed on to me by a good friend. Also, I was curious to know what type of flour you use. However, no offence meant. I apologise again. Have a good day!


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