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Old 07-15-2011, 11:54 AM   #11
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It's an introduced non-native & is extremely invasive, although I have a huge patch of it here that doesn't seem to want to go anywhere else. I'm not crazy about the flavor, so only use it as a garnish for Japanese dishes.
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Old 07-17-2011, 09:08 AM   #12
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I use 3# coffee cans, end cut off or chimney bricks as planters for the invasive herbs. I bury the coffee can, leaving about 1 inch above the ground and plant the plants in those. So far, they haven't "climbed" out of their cans and invaded other areas. Ditto for the chimney bricks. I know of people who've used old tires for the same purpose.
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Old 07-18-2011, 10:00 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I use 3# coffee cans, end cut off or chimney bricks as planters for the invasive herbs. I bury the coffee can, leaving about 1 inch above the ground and plant the plants in those. So far, they haven't "climbed" out of their cans and invaded other areas. Ditto for the chimney bricks. I know of people who've used old tires for the same purpose.
Ah - but those methods only work with plants that are invasive via their root systems - like mint, tansy, etc. Perilla/Shiso is invasive via its prodigious self-seeding (anise hyssop & lemon balm are invasive the same way), thus the only way to keep it in control is to either cut off the blooms before they set seed, &/or be extremely diligent in weeding out volunteer plants when they appear.
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How to use: Perilla/Shiso? I have tons on shiso/[I]Perilla frutescens[/I] plants coming up and I'm wondering how I could use them. I found this recipe: [URL="http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/kkaen-nip-jang-ah-jji"]Korean Perilla recipe[/URL] that I might try. Anyone ever cooked with this stuff? It's nice and leafy and has kind of a minty smell. 3 stars 1 reviews
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