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Old 05-22-2014, 01:16 PM   #101
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CWS, I don't think I said that organic lemons were better, just that I buy them when I need lemon zest. But, that would explain why my bottled lemon juice is so good. It's organic and doesn't have that nasty tasting sodium metabisulfite that's in most bottled lemon juice.
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Old 05-23-2014, 12:22 AM   #102
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CWS, I don't think I said that organic lemons were better, just that I buy them when I need lemon zest. But, that would explain why my bottled lemon juice is so good. It's organic and doesn't have that nasty tasting sodium metabisulfite that's in most bottled lemon juice.
They are sooooo much better...I'm sure you identified in one of your lemon dessert recipes that they were the lemon of choice. And that organic ginger--what was I thinking? I should've bought 2 or 3 lb. Can you send it on the bus? Or are you going down to visit Stirling's mom anytime soon? I'd meet you in C'wall for that ginger. I planted some, gave some to a friend, and kicked myself in the butt for not buying a lot more. Looked everywhere--no organic ginger to be found in Ottawa...not like that organic ginger. Amazing stuff.
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Old 05-23-2014, 12:26 PM   #103
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I have never heard of them called Chi Chi beans, but I found this info online.

A Chi-Chi bean is like a chickpea, channa, or garbanzo bean. The name comes from the Italian word for chickpea - ceci, pronounced, CHAY-chee.

I thought they were mexican.
They probably were originally
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Old 05-23-2014, 03:05 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolPa View Post
I have never heard of them called Chi Chi beans, but I found this info online.

A Chi-Chi bean is like a chickpea, channa, or garbanzo bean. The name comes from the Italian word for chickpea - ceci, pronounced, CHAY-chee.

I thought they were mexican.
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They probably were originally
Nope, not originally Mexican. Chickpea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chickpeas have been found in Neolithic Jericho, Turkey, and Greece. Wild chickpeas were found in a cave in France, carbon dated to 6790±90 BCE.

Not from the "New World".
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Old 05-23-2014, 11:54 PM   #105
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Just a tip I'l share. I'm not a big fan of canned chickpeas, either. They seem to have kind of a gritty texture to me.

If you want something hummus-like in a hurry and don't want to use dried chickpeas, I've substituted canned northern beans and they work great. Just be sure and drain them well. You'll get a nice smooth texture, and most people will not even notice the difference. In fact, I've even taken my bean hummus to work and it gets a thumbs up from the Middle Eastern people in my office.
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Old 07-03-2014, 02:04 AM   #106
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When is hummus not hummus? I took black chickpeas, freshly squeezed orange juice, garlic, garlic scapes, pomagrante molasses, tahini, EVOO, toasted sesame seeds, toasted ground cumin and corriander...threw that all in the blender, made hummus. Very good, but when is hummus not hummus?
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Old 07-03-2014, 06:26 AM   #107
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Question

I've never added tahini to hummus. Whilst I know the merits of sesame seeds etc. it strikes me as very cloying. What do others think it adds to the overall taste of hummus...if anything?
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Old 07-03-2014, 07:08 AM   #108
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I've never added tahini to hummus. Whilst I know the merits of sesame seeds etc. it strikes me as very cloying. What do others think it adds to the overall taste of hummus...if anything?
Tahini adds a smoky layer of taste to hummus. I don't find that it adds any sweetness (which is what I assume you meant by the "very cloying"). Since I make hummus almost every week, I typically play with it. Lately, I'm on the black chickpea kick. Although, I taught s/one how to make hummus the other day and made it with only the traditional ingredients, figured he could expand on it once he has mastered making basic hummus.
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Old 07-03-2014, 07:27 AM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
Tahini adds a smoky layer of taste to hummus. I don't find that it adds any sweetness (which is what I assume you meant by the "very cloying"). Since I make hummus almost every week, I typically play with it. Lately, I'm on the black chickpea kick. Although, I taught s/one how to make hummus the other day and made it with only the traditional ingredients, figured he could expand on it once he has mastered making basic hummus.
Ah...thanks. So it's the smokiness. By cloying I meant the texture - like peanut butter that sticks to the mouth.
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Old 07-03-2014, 07:29 AM   #110
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Quote:
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When is hummus not hummus? I took black chickpeas, freshly squeezed orange juice, garlic, garlic scapes, pomagrante molasses, tahini, EVOO, toasted sesame seeds, toasted ground cumin and corriander...threw that all in the blender, made hummus. Very good, but when is hummus not hummus?
I doubt that there are any hard defining terms for this. A chickpea paste/dip can be regarded as hummus, in my view.

However, I guess it comes under variations of traditional hummus.

Great to be adventurous!
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