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Old 09-09-2006, 11:11 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookingFanToo
Thanks Sharon!

How does Melba Sauce taste? I mean is it enjoyable to eat?
Oh yeah - Melba Sauce is a classic recipe which was invented by a famous French chef Auguste Escoffier for Australian opera singer Dame Nellie Melba, for a dessert called Peach Melba.

Do the search thing in here too. For most anything you find, chances are the ones who posted them are still around and will be willing to chat about the older posts.
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Old 09-10-2006, 02:30 AM   #12
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Borscht is also something wich is generally considered typically russian. Never made or tried it though.
Pickeled vegetables are an essential part of the russian diet, along with (red chili!)vodka.
If money is not an object: Pommes Moskovites.
And ofcourse there are the bliny. A very old and traditional dish that is basically a pancake to us.
To make them you need :
* 650 gr of flour (up to half of that buckwheat flour if you like)
* 1/2 litre of milk
* 25 gr of fresh yeast
* a few tbspoon of fresh butter
* 100 gr of sour cream
* 2 eggs
* 1tbspoon of sugar
* pinch of salt
---
First make a basic batter with the yeast, milk (luke-warm) and about 1/2 the flour and the butter (softened) and let it rest for halfd an hour or so.
Whisk the eggyolks with the sugar and beat the eggwhites untill stiff. Scoop the cream under the eggwhites. Add the eggyolks to the batter and whisk them in. Then gently stirr in the eggwhites and start adding the remaining flour and a good pinch of salt.
When the batter is nice and smooth, let it sit for a while longer. Fry them as a not too thin pancake.

Then stuff (the shape of a spring roll) the blini with the stuffing of your choice. They stuff them with all sorts of things including fried wild mushrooms or previously fried minced meat with oignons. And for some reason just about every stuffing seems to go perfectly with a spoon of sourcream and a good sprinkle of fresh herbs.
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Old 09-10-2006, 03:20 AM   #13
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Ohh well... since you asked for recipe's...
Recipe for Pommes Moskovites:
Ingredients (per person)
* 1 smallish potato (unpeeled but thouroughly washed and brushed)
* sour cream
* extremely finely chopped parsley
* kaviar

Steam or boil the potato's. Holding them lengthwise (as they naturally sit on your chopping board) cut off a piece of the bottom (so it will sit better on a plate) and cut off about 1/3 off the top. Scoop out atleast 1/3 of the trimmed potato. Season the hole in your potato very discretely with pepper and salt. Fill the hole with sour cream drizzle a little parsley over it and top generously with kaviar (obviously, the smaller potato's you take, the less kaviar you'll need).
Serve with cool champagne or freezer cold vodka.

Alternatively, you can replace the kaviar with a nice thick piece of smoked salmon (replace the parsley with dill). Not russian and not "Pommes Moskovites" but just as tasty.
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Old 09-10-2006, 04:33 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CookingFanToo
Um.... is it the only advice you have given in the 8,122 posts? I mean, what about fellowshiping with people? What about hearing from people in real time who actually cooked the meals and enjoyed them? I'd prefer that over some cookbook.
I felt a little like that about the search tool initially, but have found that it is actually brilliant : an amazing resource. And if you have questions about pstings you can just add them on....if the people are here still I'm sure they'll answer, its very friendly and helpful here. And if they are not around then you are still getting insight into a recipe cooked by the person who posted it, so its all good

Apart from caviar, blinis and sour cream I am not great with russian food. We occasionally have borsht. Nigella Lawson has wonderful looking Georgian recipes in her book "Feast" (I bet they are google-able) if you are counting ex-USSR states as "Russian". Particularly interesting to me was the cheesey bread she discussed.

I was somewhat put of exploring Russian food after going to a Russian restaurant in Mayfair where I had a starter that I found horrendous - it is the only part of the meal I remember!- it was layers of flavourless mushrooms in layers with a strong, cheddar like cheese melted to a rubbery texture and cooked in an individual pot....some what Like a ramekin. Its texture and taste were both unappealing to me, but maybe someone else could appreciate it!
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Old 09-10-2006, 05:33 AM   #15
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Russian Tea Cakes recipe (Also known as Swedish Tea Cakes)

These are actually delicious cookies -- crumbly, buttery, nutty.

Greek Cookies or Russian Tea Cakes Recipe?
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Old 09-10-2006, 09:18 AM   #16
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I like this site, with very interesting recipes and infos about their culinary culture.
My personal favourite, I am not sure what I would call it but it is my recreation of something I had at a Russian restaurant in London. It is very simple to make and absolutely delicious.

Slice up the mushrooms (regular white will be fine but more flavourful types will be even better)
Finely chop up the onions.
Sautè the mushrooms with a little butter, s&p.
When they are cooked well, with onions at the point of being caramelized, add some vodka and a piece of bayleaf, let it simmer for 10-15minutes.
Stir in sour cream and chopped flat leaved parsley, and heat it up (but not to the boil) thoroughly.

This was served in a deep "pot pie" style (on a deep jar covered with a crusty bread on top), it is delicious by themselves without the topping as well, or as a condiment for your pasta.

I would love to try blini and pirozhki one day, if I could find a recipe that I can trust upon. I haven't as yet though...
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Old 09-10-2006, 10:43 AM   #17
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Thank you all for all your recipes! It's amazing. You know what is interesting? Quite a few of you are posting from other than Russia countries yet you enjoy russian cooking. I find it refreshing!

My apology to jkath. Sorry I was a bit harsh in my reply to you. I am just short on time to research it on my own. Still I should have been more considerate.
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Old 09-10-2006, 11:05 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
Slice up the mushrooms (regular white will be fine but more flavourful types will be even better)
Finely chop up the onions.
Sautè the mushrooms with a little butter, s&p.
When they are cooked well, with onions at the point of being caramelized, add some vodka and a piece of bayleaf, let it simmer for 10-15minutes.
Stir in sour cream and chopped flat leaved parsley, and heat it up (but not to the boil) thoroughly.

This was served in a deep "pot pie" style (on a deep jar covered with a crusty bread on top), it is delicious by themselves without the topping as well, or as a condiment for your pasta.
urmaniac AND CookingFanToo - I do this same thing but with the addition of a little horseradish along with the sour cream. It makes an exceptional appetizer using whole mushrooms.
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Old 09-10-2006, 01:55 PM   #19
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I read somewhere that Russians use all kinds of wild mushrooms, what mushrooms would you recommend?
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Old 09-10-2006, 08:13 PM   #20
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In terms of authenticity, it doesn't realy matter what kind you use. Wild mushrooms in russia (particulary around Moskow) are realy wild. I.e. they hand-pick them in the forrests. And whatever they find ends up in their mushroom dishes (or is sold to the fancy hotels and restaurants).
I would guess that the typical trip to the forrest would yield Cantharelles, Porcini and/or oyster mushrooms. Either one (or a combination of them) would work great. Shiitake aren't native to russia, but that wouldn't realy bother me. Afterall, they taste great so why not use them?
Or you could ofcourse always use the good old white button mushroom. They just have a less pronounced taste than the otherones.
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