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Old 11-06-2005, 05:04 AM   #11
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Pork is a taboo in Pakistani or Bangladeshi foods. They are, in the main, Muslims - and like Jews, do not eat pork.

Very, very few 'Indian' restaurants in the UK would cook with either pork or beef. Usually it's lamb, chicken and fish.
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Old 11-09-2005, 06:02 PM   #12
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Hi urmaniac, yeah Pork is not popular in India except in Goa which is a resort town that was heavily influenced by the Portuguese and the majority of the population is Christian.

I am a Muslim so I don't eat pork but I do eat beef. Meatball curry also known as kofta curry is once again a moghulai preparation (influenced by the Muslim immigrants). I use ground beef to make my meatballs but ground goat or lamb can be substituted.

It's made by marinating the ground beef with ginger paste and spices (chilli powder, cumin and corrainder powder, salt, finely chopped cilantro and handful of fresh mint). Next you make a curry (with onions, tomatoes, freshly ground Indian spices and garam masala), add some yogurt to it. Next you add some water to make the gravy a tiny bit thin and then place the raw meat balls in the gravy and let them simmer for an hour until the meatballs are cooked. They soak up the gravy and the gravy thickens. You garnish it with cilantro and serve it with naan and rice.

Its delicious if you are into curries.
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Old 11-10-2005, 07:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
Hi urmaniac, yeah Pork is not popular in India except in Goa which is a resort town that was heavily influenced by the Portuguese and the majority of the population is Christian.

I am a Muslim so I don't eat pork but I do eat beef. Meatball curry also known as kofta curry is once again a moghulai preparation (influenced by the Muslim immigrants). I use ground beef to make my meatballs but ground goat or lamb can be substituted.

It's made by marinating the ground beef with ginger paste and spices (chilli powder, cumin and corrainder powder, salt, finely chopped cilantro and handful of fresh mint). Next you make a curry (with onions, tomatoes, freshly ground Indian spices and garam masala), add some yogurt to it. Next you add some water to make the gravy a tiny bit thin and then place the raw meat balls in the gravy and let them simmer for an hour until the meatballs are cooked. They soak up the gravy and the gravy thickens. You garnish it with cilantro and serve it with naan and rice.

Its delicious if you are into curries.
Mmm, sounds delicious Yakuta!! It is great to know that you can use beef in certain dishes, that gives more variety to what I can cook. Usually I don't have problem with just using chicken or fish, but this idea of "meatball" for curry really intridued me. I don't care for "minced" chicken and as I said, I don't eat lamb. Exactly what spices do you mix? Aside from garam masala, we have ground coriander, turmeric, cumin and cardamom. Will this combination work? I do have curry powder too but I would like to try a made-from-scratch version... Also would you toast and cook cardamom, too? I was always told to just add a dash to the dish just before the cooking is done because they would lose the intense flavour when they are cooked too much... I followed this advice always, but is this true?
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Old 11-10-2005, 05:59 PM   #14
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urmaniac the spices you have should work just fine in the curry. If you really want a good flavor in your curries and want to make a spice mixture from scratch (This is my generic curry powder I recommend the following)

3 tbsp of whole cumin seeds
3 tbsp of whole corrainder seeds
3 dried red chillies ( I like arabol but whatever you can get your hands on)

Dry roast them in a pan and once they are slighly brown you can grind them. I store them in a jar. I add a little bit of turmeric powder to it and some salt and here you have your generic curry powder to use which is much much better than any store bought versions you can ever buy). You can use this for marinades or curries. It's really versatile in any dish that calls for curry powder.

Also I am not a big minced chicken or lamb fan. I am not a big lamb eater and I prefer goat to the gamey lamb any day. You can use ground beef in keema matar, Indian style kababs and kofta curries. Normally Indian recipes never call for beef because beef is taboo in the Hindu culture just as Pork is in the Muslim and Jewish culture and India has a fair amount of religions to accomodate :-).

I am sure you can use ground pork as well (nothing prevents you from being creative). If you like it stick to it or switch to another meat.
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Old 11-11-2005, 09:11 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
urmaniac the spices you have should work just fine in the curry. If you really want a good flavor in your curries and want to make a spice mixture from scratch (This is my generic curry powder I recommend the following)

3 tbsp of whole cumin seeds
3 tbsp of whole corrainder seeds
3 dried red chillies ( I like arabol but whatever you can get your hands on)

Dry roast them in a pan and once they are slighly brown you can grind them. I store them in a jar. I add a little bit of turmeric powder to it and some salt and here you have your generic curry powder to use which is much much better than any store bought versions you can ever buy). You can use this for marinades or curries. It's really versatile in any dish that calls for curry powder.

Also I am not a big minced chicken or lamb fan. I am not a big lamb eater and I prefer goat to the gamey lamb any day. You can use ground beef in keema matar, Indian style kababs and kofta curries. Normally Indian recipes never call for beef because beef is taboo in the Hindu culture just as Pork is in the Muslim and Jewish culture and India has a fair amount of religions to accomodate :-).

I am sure you can use ground pork as well (nothing prevents you from being creative). If you like it stick to it or switch to another meat.
Yakuta, I am terribly sorry about peskily persisting, but your reply produced yet another question!! Our current spices in possession are already ground, in powdery form, except for cardamom(this we grind them fresh each time). I know this is not ideal, but we only acquired the proper spice seed masher (a little bowl with a thick stick) just a few months ago... now we intend to by the whole seeds at the next opportunity (we live near the quarter where many indians/pakistanis have specialty shops, so they are fairly easily available), but the ones we already have will take some time before we finish them... do you have any tip for toasting already ground spices, IF that is possible... I think they would burn too easily... I have tried just adding the spices during the process of sautčeing onions, gingers and garlic with oil, and let them cook a little before adding something more liquid. Is this method passable? Or should we just get the whole seeds? (I don't think they are so terribly expensive... whole seeds usually cost less than grounds...)
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Old 11-11-2005, 11:16 AM   #16
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Normally ground spices have a very short shelf life (less than a couple of months). They may still work but they really add nothing to the flavor given all the essential oils have evaporated and what's left is literally a sawdust kind of a mix which is better to toss out.

It's hard to toast preground spices because it will do nothing to perk them up. I would say continue using them as you do today (toasting them in oil) until you run out and then just buy whole ones. It's not a laundry list of ingredients if you buy whole since you can really use the same spices (cumin, corrainder and chillies) in Latin American, Carribean and Spanish cooking as well.
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Old 11-11-2005, 11:40 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
Normally ground spices have a very short shelf life (less than a couple of months). They may still work but they really add nothing to the flavor given all the essential oils have evaporated and what's left is literally a sawdust kind of a mix which is better to toss out.

It's hard to toast preground spices because it will do nothing to perk them up. I would say continue using them as you do today (toasting them in oil) until you run out and then just buy whole ones. It's not a laundry list of ingredients if you buy whole since you can really use the same spices (cumin, corrainder and chillies) in Latin American, Carribean and Spanish cooking as well.
My spices have been on the shelf more than a few months, I was just thinking it seems like I have been having to use more of them than before lately, probably it was because they were losing their punch, so we will replace them with the whole seeds soon. Thanks Yakuta, as always for being so helpful... you should publish a book on proper indian cuisine!!
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Old 11-11-2005, 12:03 PM   #18
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Urmaniac no problem. I guess cookbooks are effective only to an extent. There are so many of them out there and I am still not convinced people get everything out of them.

I prefer working in smaller groups and both sharing and learning from others. I do this with some of my friends from different ethniticities and have cooking parties where we decide on the menu and then meet up and try different things. It works better that way. I also like this forum because people are not just here to read but are truly open and want to try something new and are wiilling to take a chance.

I personally have used so many of the recipes that people have shared and I have really not been disappointed.
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