"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-21-2007, 04:09 PM   #21
Senior Cook
 
BettyR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Hull, Texas
Posts: 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
Betty, your last post highlights another difference in peoples perspective. If your idea of what defines authentic food comes from home kitchens of friends and family who are first and second generation immigrants, you aren't likely to have the same picture as someones whose ideas were formed primarily by authentic restaurant cuisine or a formal culinary education. My favorite Mexican restaurants tend to be the ones where I might be the only gringo in the building.

Yes, you are correct. There is nothing more Texan than a Chicken Fried Steak; but this dish was born of the German fritter.

So I guess you would have to answer the question of what is authentic Ethnic food, the food that is cooked and eaten on a daily basis by the people who live in said country or the food that is prepared in the ethnic restaurant.

I was raised in a French speaking Creole community and when I go into a Cajun restaurant I don’t really see much of anything that I recognize as what I grew up eating. The names are the same but the food is not.
__________________

__________________
"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf" - George Orwell.

"What we do, more than anything we say, reveals what we truly value the most." - An Unknown Soldier
BettyR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 04:29 PM   #22
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410
the average eater is not interested in authentic cuisine, but in quick and easy and what's familiar.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
I only think the second half of that statement is correct. I further think that if authentic cuisine was familiar to them then they would be just as interested as they are in non-authentic cuisine (with some exceptions). The majority of people only eat what they eat because it is available and easy to access. If authentic places popped up and were easy to get to them more people would be into them.
The word CHEAP also needs to be added into that statement to make it correct. That's the reason why places like Olive Garden are so **** popular. It sure as **** isn't because it's good or authentic.
__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 04:43 PM   #23
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,369
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
...places like Olive Garden are so **** popular. It sure as **** isn't because it's good or authentic.

Golly gee, ironchef, what about Olive Garden's Culinary Institute of Tuscany??
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 05:15 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Golly gee, ironchef, what about Olive Garden's Culinary Institute of Tuscany??
You know, I would be interested in going there just to see what it is they do at that place. One of my friends told me a while ago that Olive Garden was now making risotto on their menu. So I checked it out (it's a shrimp and asparagus risotto) and sure enough, they bastardized it by putting in parmesan cheese. If that's the sort of things they are "learning" at their Culinary Institute of Tuscany, they may as well just close up shop. They can just stay home and learn how to make risotto the wrong way.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 05:39 PM   #25
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: california
Posts: 167
[quote.

So I guess you would have to answer the question of what is authentic Ethnic food, the food that is cooked and eaten on a daily basis by the people who live in said country or the food that is prepared in the ethnic restaurant.


Authentic ethnic? What is cooked on a daily bases in the country of origin of a dish.
Whatever is interpreted (or riuned in most cases) is NOT the above.
Still could be good food as I said earlier, but should be called something else.

The names are the same but the food is not.

And that is my problem.

I was once offered a "Chicken paprikas" made with ketchup for cryin' out loud!!

Give them another name and don't call them aithentic and I will be fine. Even enjoy those dishes.
__________________
mitmondol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 05:42 PM   #26
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: california
Posts: 167
This is interesting read also:

A crash course in Mexico's varied cuisine - CNN.com
__________________
mitmondol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2007, 02:09 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
About a month ago, I purchased a copy of Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen. I've been reading, re-reading, and making some of the recipes as I can. I love them!

We have a growing Hispanic community here in east Tulsa as well. There are a few Mexican grocery stores, and even a Tortilleria just a few miles from here. I've spent time in them, browsing, buying a few things, etc.

I can fully understand the comment about "the only gringo in the house".
__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2007, 03:33 PM   #28
Head Chef
 
Caine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: CHINATOWN
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
That's why I hate going into the "authentic" Mexican restaurants in my area. The service is outrageously slow because everyone who works in the kitchen has to come out and see the gringo that's speaking Spanish. I have the same reaction when I go into Pilipino restaurants and grocery stores and start speaking tagalog. What, they think ALL Americans brains are so small, they can only hold one language?
__________________
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2007, 03:44 PM   #29
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK
We have a growing Hispanic community here in east Tulsa as well. There are a few Mexican grocery stores, and even a Tortilleria just a few miles from here. I've spent time in them, browsing, buying a few things, etc.
I have found developing a relationship with the neighborhood Mexican grocery rewarding and worth while. It has a great dairy case, a fair selection of good Mexican produce, and a good meat counter. The only person working in the store who speaks English is the young girl behind the counter but if they aren't busy she will translate with the butcher, owner, or a customer for me. I've rarely seen another customer speak English; never as their primary language.

Almost all the patrons of this little mercado also occasionally shop at one large, locally owned supermarket. It carries all things Anglo but also goes out of the way to cater to the Hispanic community. Learning my way around that store was another big help. I bet there is a supermarket filling the same niche in Tulsa.
__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2007, 04:26 PM   #30
Head Chef
 
skilletlicker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Memphis, TN
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine
That's why I hate going into the "authentic" Mexican restaurants in my area. The service is outrageously slow because everyone who works in the kitchen has to come out and see the gringo that's speaking Spanish. I have the same reaction when I go into Pilipino restaurants and grocery stores and start speaking tagalog. What, they think ALL Americans brains are so small, they can only hold one language?
I doubt if speaking Spanish attracts much attention. Maybe it is what you say or how you say it, instead of the language you say it in.
__________________

__________________
Old bachelor cook

skilletlicker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.