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Old 11-10-2018, 06:02 AM   #1
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ISO recipes for Pozole Soup

Kayelle, would you share your's?


you mentioned it under the Soup Forum..


There is one from GG.? that is very good, more of a Green New Mexico Stew.



I have been working on this soup for several years, and am ready to try again tommarow.


So please! Any and All who have tried this rather odd soup.


Chime In!


Eric, Austin Tx.

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Old 11-12-2018, 08:32 AM   #2
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This is how I make mine or used to before having problems with gout. https://youtu.be/PPMChZ9QMjU

But to get it the best possible you need to find or make nixtamal. Basically hominy but freshly made will give you the best texture.
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Old 11-12-2018, 10:45 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
There is one from GG.? that is very good, more of a Green New Mexico Stew.
Kayelle and her husband are on a cruise celebrating their anniversary. You might want to bump this up in a couple of weeks when they get back.

The posole I posted is actually a posole recipe. There are two types of posole - verde (green) and roja (red). The word posole means hominy; that's what differentiates it from a New Mexico green chile stew (chile verde).
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Old 12-06-2018, 11:26 AM   #4
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at 2PO, you must be my Long Lost Cousin! I also have been using cut up Pig's Feet.


at KL, are you home safe yet?


I had some Menudo yesterday, but it was only OK...


I think I will stick with Posole for now.


Thanks all, Eric, Austin Tx.
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Old 12-06-2018, 12:31 PM   #5
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Hi Eric! We had a wonderful time and thanks for asking.
Here's the recipe I posted for Pollo Pisole...It could also be done with cubes of pork shoulder if you prefer. Just add some canned chicken broth if you want it more like soup than stew.



Kayelle's Pollo Pisole
I made this tonight with what I had on hand and it turned out really well.

4 diced garlic cloves
2 cups sliced white onions
1 cut up green bell pepper
Saute above in a large dutch oven

Add:
1 4 oz. can of green chili's
1 10 oz. can of green enchilada sauce
1 can of cream of chicken soup
1 can of Rotel tomatoes with chili's
1 29 can of drained white hominy
6 boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut up
1 Tbs. ground cumin
2 tsp. Mexican oregano, crushed between fingers
1 tsp. cumin seeds
2 tsp. salt

Cook covered, low and slow, either on top of stove or in the oven. It could easily be done in a crock pot also.

Serve each bowl with crumbled Cotija cheese, and green onions on top.
Hot tortillas, on the side.
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Old 12-07-2018, 12:14 AM   #6
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If you want to make your own hominy for pozole, here's how to do it. Warning: it won't taste the same after this, if you use canned hominy!


You can find the dried corn, as well as the cal for this in Mexican groceries. They also sometimes sell pretreated, dried pozole corn. You can smell this through the plastic they wrap it in - smells like corn tortillas, though not as strong. This is also good, but it's still better made from scratch, and not really difficult.

Nixtamal:

2 lbs dry dent or flint corn, rinsed and drained
3 qts water
3 tb cal (a.k.a. pickling lime, slaked lime, calcium hydroxide)

The evening before:

In a large SS pot, dissolve the cal in the water, and stir in the corn. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then simmer for 15 min. Remove from heat, and let soak until the following day.

The next day, drain the corn, then add tepid water to the pot, and rub the skins off of the corn kernels, washing them away, and adding more water several times. Traditional recipes call for "deheading" the kernels - removing that little dark speck on the kernels, but I don't bother with that.






My favorite pozoles are reds - the pumpkin seeds in traditional pozole verde sort of masks the flavor of the hominy some.

I have a boneless pork shoulder I may have to make some with!
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Old 12-07-2018, 06:08 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
If you want to make your own hominy for pozole, here's how to do it. Warning: it won't taste the same after this, if you use canned hominy!


You can find the dried corn, as well as the cal for this in Mexican groceries. They also sometimes sell pretreated, dried pozole corn. You can smell this through the plastic they wrap it in - smells like corn tortillas, though not as strong. This is also good, but it's still better made from scratch, and not really difficult.

Nixtamal:

2 lbs dry dent or flint corn, rinsed and drained
3 qts water
3 tb cal (a.k.a. pickling lime, slaked lime, calcium hydroxide)

The evening before:

In a large SS pot, dissolve the cal in the water, and stir in the corn. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then simmer for 15 min. Remove from heat, and let soak until the following day.

The next day, drain the corn, then add tepid water to the pot, and rub the skins off of the corn kernels, washing them away, and adding more water several times. Traditional recipes call for "deheading" the kernels - removing that little dark speck on the kernels, but I don't bother with that.






My favorite pozoles are reds - the pumpkin seeds in traditional pozole verde sort of masks the flavor of the hominy some.

I have a boneless pork shoulder I may have to make some with!
Thanks for posting this. I needed the ratios now I can make my own
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ISO recipes for Pozole Soup Kayelle, would you share your's? you mentioned it under the Soup Forum.. There is one from GG.? that is very good, more of a Green New Mexico Stew. I have been working on this soup for several years, and am ready to try again tommarow. So please! Any and All who have tried this rather odd soup. Chime In! Eric, Austin Tx. 3 stars 1 reviews
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