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Old 01-09-2009, 05:39 PM   #21
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Yea, we gave it two days now we are impatient! LOL. I am not worried, it will take me some time to go thru the recipes and try each one out, and get good at making em!
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Old 01-10-2009, 01:09 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MexicoKaren View Post
I've been wondering why I've never seen sopapillas down here, so I did a lttle googling and it's because they are NEW Mexican - a great culinary tradition of New Mexico (and I have eaten them there). Here, I have had bunuelos, which are similar. They are a lightly sweetened fry bread that is usually dusted with a mixture of cinnamon and sugar or drizzled with pinoncillo (brown sugar) syrup. They are wonderful. PieSusan has done the research...but we want to do some EATING.

Edited to add: OK, I just read the article PieSusan posted...bunuelos are NOT fry bread. They are more like doughnuts. Oh gosh, how can you go wrong? So they are also alot like beignets, that you get in New Orleans...I think I must make some.
The article is comparing these three different treats because there are similarities but yes they are different.
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:27 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PieSusan View Post
Very interesting question, Grasshopper. Ok, there are similarities among three different things:
Bunuelos, Indian Fry Bread and Sopapillas. Learn about them here and find tried and true authentic recipes:
Bunuelos Recipes, Mexican-Style Doughnuts, Buñuelos vs. Indian Fry Bread vs. Sopapillas, Southwest Cooking, Mexican Cooking, Southwest Food

Navajo Fry Bread History and Recipe, Indian Tacos History and Recipe,

Sopapillas, New Mexico Sopapillas, Southwest Cooking, Native American Cooking, Southwest Food
I made that fry bread recipe for dessert last night. I just used regular milk, and fashioned them into balls to make fritters. Everybody at my house loves fritters! They are so easy that I had them mixed and ready to fry before the deep fryer was even hot!
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:39 AM   #24
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I talked to one of my co-workers about sopapillas being "hollow" or "spongy". He said that's a matter of personal preference. But, I did have one thing right. For "spongy" sopapillas, don't roll them really thin, and for "hollow" sopapillas, roll them really thin. I think I've been rolling them at least 1/16" thick.
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:44 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
I talked to one of my co-workers about sopapillas being "hollow" or "spongy". He said that's a matter of personal preference. But, I did have one thing right. For "spongy" sopapillas, don't roll them really thin, and for "hollow" sopapillas, roll them really thin. I think I've been rolling them at least 1/16" thick.
Hey Allen, do you remember Rex's Chicken there in Tulsa? They had the best fry bread I've ever had... It would be great to get a copycat recipe of that fry bread...
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Old 01-11-2009, 11:51 AM   #26
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Okay, boys and girls, I found my recipe. Here it is:

SOPAIPILLAS
(Makes about 40)
1¼ cups milk
1 (¼ oz.) pkg. active dry yeast or 2¼ tsp. bulk active dry yeast
¼ cup warm water (105°)
4 cups all-purpose flour
1½ tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking powder
1 Tbsp. unsalted butter
4 cups peanut or other vegetable oil
Powdered sugar, for dusting

Scald milk by heating in a small saucepan or in the microwave until small bubbles appear around the edge; set aside and allow to cool to lukewarm.

In a small bowl, sprinkle yeast over warm water. Add a pinch of the flour to the yeast-water mixture. Stir to dissolve yeast and let stand until bubbly; about 10 minutes. Stir in cooled milk.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour salt and baking powder. Cut in butter with a pastry blender or fork until a crumbly mixture results.

Create a “well” in the dry ingredients and pour in the milk-yeast mixture. Stir until a soft dough forms.

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead about 15 to 20 times, adding as little flour as possible. Form into a ball, cover and let rest for 10 minutes.

While dough is resting, pour oil into a heavy pan or deep fryer to about 3-inches deep. Bring to 400°, testing with a thermometer.

Divide dough into two parts. Roll each into 10- x 8- inch rectangles, cutting each into 20 equal squares. Slightly stretch a few squares at a time and drop into hot oil. Keep remaining dough covered while cooking stretched squares.

Fry for about 2 minutes, turning once, or until golden and puffed. Drain on a wire rack placed over paper towels. Dust with powdered sugar when cooled.
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Old 01-11-2009, 12:00 PM   #27
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I also served a "dipping" sauce with the sopaipillas. It's simple.

Bring to a boil 1/2 cup water and 6 tablespoons brown sugar. Stir constantly and let boil until it begins to thicken slightly. Remove from heat and add 1/2 cup dry sherry and 1/2 cup raisins. You can add about 1/2 teaspoon maple flavoring if you want. I didn't because I didn't have any at the time, so I can't say how it would taste. Serve the sauce hot.
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Old 01-11-2009, 06:48 PM   #28
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thanks katie - we normally use pizza dough (pizza fritz) and fry them that more the intalian style, but we do like these and i have tried a couple of recipes that were ok but so-so

going to try yours sound good. thank you
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Old 01-11-2009, 07:52 PM   #29
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Awesome, Katie!

I have always been interested in how different cultures and countries make similar things.
Just think about:
wonton
ravioli
pierogi
pieroshki
pelmeni
kreplach

They are all different and yet vaguely similar.

You see it all the time with desserts and breads, too.
E.g. the only difference between challah and brioche is that brioche is made with butter and challah is pareve and is made with oil.

These things fascinate me.
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Old 01-20-2009, 12:43 PM   #30
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If you're not too concerned about authenticity you could get a tube of store brand biscuits and deep fry them at 350 deg. for about two minutes per side. This is how "Chinese donuts" are made, and they are delicious...
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