"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-26-2008, 02:10 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
SizzlininIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Indiana
Posts: 5,023
I just had an Alzheimers class at work this week and we were discussing some foods and curry is one of the things that came up that they recommended people incorporate in their diet.


Here's an interesting read regarding research at Rush Universty Medical Center.......Alzheimer's Disease and Food
__________________

__________________
Se non supporta il calore, vattene dalla cucina!
SizzlininIN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2008, 03:17 PM   #12
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Greater Annapolis MD Area
Posts: 257
Thanks to all of you for enlightening me about "curry" I am now going to sit an ponder all that was said, then try dabbling in some dishes. Looks like a trip or two the the library for some recipes. Thanks again
__________________

__________________
Elf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2008, 06:22 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: England, UK
Posts: 120
why go to the library, Elf??

Why not Google for some. Most of the recipes on the net are OK, maybe not great, but look at ones on this, and other forums first. If in doubt, post here to see what people's opinions are. Don't post the recipe, just the url. Or if you don't know what to look for, post your needs/wants here, and we will do what we can to help.
Good hunting
__________________
take time to smell the roses 8-)
waaza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2008, 05:00 AM   #14
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I found a curry plant this year and am thoroughly enjoying it. But yes, curries vary greatly. This time of year I love to do Thai curries because they are so dependent upon fresh herbs and I have a great herb garden. In the winter I'm more inclined to do dahl-based curries because the dried herbs are great.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2008, 03:15 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 17
I always figured it was all called curry for us westeners cause we couldn't pronounce the actual name the right way anyway :p
I have a series of packaged "curries". all with different names and flavors. It says right on the package that it's for the time and talent challenged and while not as good as freshly ground spices, it's as close as you'll come without the effort (they aren't quite so blunt about it :D) Don't know how authentic they are, as I've never been to India. Somehow, I think most of us would be shocked at the difference in real chinese, indian, japanese, etc, food.
__________________
chicklady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2008, 07:09 AM   #16
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: England, UK
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicklady View Post
I always figured it was all called curry for us westeners cause we couldn't pronounce the actual name the right way anyway :p
I have a series of packaged "curries". all with different names and flavors. It says right on the package that it's for the time and talent challenged and while not as good as freshly ground spices, it's as close as you'll come without the effort (they aren't quite so blunt about it :D) Don't know how authentic they are, as I've never been to India. Somehow, I think most of us would be shocked at the difference in real chinese, indian, japanese, etc, food.

Sometimes, its not the ingredients (some are very Indian, some not) but what you do with them. Above I mentioned that 'curry' is not a sauce, but a gravy. By that I mean one has to develop th flavours, not just throw a lot of flavours together. And develop means change the flavours of the ingredients or bring out the flavours that are there.

One problem with spice blends is that they have to be added at one time. In Indian cooking, spices are usually added individually, or at least in small mixes, to accomplish different things.

Spices, such as the 'woody' ones, (cassia [often called cinnamon] cardamom, cloves and nutmeg/mace) need to be extracted into hot oil/fat/ghee, so these should be added at the beginning of cooking, when there is only oil present in the cooking dish. Adding these spices while onions are frying also works well in some dishes. Coriander and cumin powders depen in colour and fom nutty/roast flavours, and are added just before water-based liquids, as may chilli powder and turmeric, both of which have components which only dissolve in oil. Ginger and fennel I would add after water-based ingredients have been added, to reduce the likelihood of burning. So you can see that adding all the spices at once is only a compromise, and not conducive to preparing the best possible product.

However, even in India, spice mixes, to prepare only one type of dish, are becoming very popular, maybe reflecting the apparent lack of time the busy food preparer has for this task. Its a shame, as it may well herald the end of Indian food as we know it. It also limits the cook to a few dishes; there may be only a small number of common spices used in many dishes, but 'quick cooks' could end up buying many tens of packets of different ready made mixes, makes no sense! We may not be seeing the dhabba (the small spice box containing, typically, seven trays of common spices) by the side of Indian cookers, or those that prepare Indian food, regularly, for much longer.
__________________
take time to smell the roses 8-)
waaza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2008, 12:09 PM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 17
I'm afraid you're right. I do own both green cardamom and black cardamom, as well as some tiny little black seeds that start with an N (see how often those come out????) I'm guessing those are so old by now that they've lost their OMPH!
__________________
chicklady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 02:55 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: England, UK
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicklady View Post
I'm afraid you're right. I do own both green cardamom and black cardamom, as well as some tiny little black seeds that start with an N (see how often those come out????) I'm guessing those are so old by now that they've lost their OMPH!
if they are Nigella (kalonji in Hindi) then they will keep their lavour far longer than you might think. Just crunch a few and see! Its the powdered spices that lose their flavour quickly.
__________________
take time to smell the roses 8-)
waaza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 03:15 PM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 17
Nigella! That's it. Never did figure out what to do with them.
__________________
chicklady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 04:48 PM   #20
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: England, UK
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicklady View Post
Nigella! That's it. Never did figure out what to do with them.

they are most often used as a sprinkle on naan. There is an Iranian/Indian dish with chicken using them, and they are a component of panch phoran, the Bengali 'five spice mix' which is fried in oil at the beginning or sometimes at the end of cooking a dish. Also, in Bengali cuisine, they are often refered to as 'kalo jeera', which can be translated as black cumin, although it has nothing to do with the black cumin (also called shah jeera [Royal cumin]) used in NW Indian cooking. Kalonji can be used in pickle making. Can also be used as a garnish on yoghurt based raita, etc.
__________________

__________________
take time to smell the roses 8-)
waaza is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.