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Old 10-10-2017, 07:35 AM   #1
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Kharcho, Georgian soup.

Was not sure if I should put this in soups, or here. Since it is ethnic dish, I'm adding to this forum. If administration decides otherwise please move to soups. In all the truth, I thought I have posted this recipe before, but I could not find.

Kcharcho, or Harcho is a most common Georgian soup that was found in restaurants back in Soviet days, and from what I understand it is still very popular. Here is the recipe.

Kcharco/Harco/Charcho-TNT

Beef – 2 pounds
Water – 4 quarts
Ripe tomatoes, peeled and diced – 1 pound
Onion, small to medium, chopped/diced – 2-3
Lemon, sliced and cut in halves – 1
Tomato paste – 2 table spoons
Cilantro, chopped – 1 small bunch
Parsley, chopped – 1 small bunch
Bay leaves – 3
Garlic, crushed – 4-5 cloves
Hot red pepper, like cane or similar
Salt
Oil for sautéing
Rice – 1 cup

Directions:
Wash and cut up meat. Cook in 4 quarts of water, simmering till completely cook. Make sure to peak the dirty foam forming on the top while cooking. After it stops foaming I like to add bay leaves. Separately sauté the chopped onions adding tomato paste.
When meat is done add sautéed onions, tomatoes, herbs and garlic. Add salt and pepper, to taste. Bring back to boil add rice. Cook for 20 minutes.
To serve put the slice of lemon on the side of the plate, so the people can squeeze the juice into soup. Alternatively, you can simply add lemon juice to soup during cooking.

Notes: I found out that cooking rice in the soup doesn’t work for me. I like to cook rice separately and just add to bowl/plate when serving. Also you can add some fresh herbs directly into plate in addition to what is already in the pot.
Being from Ukraine, soup has to be served with Sour Cream (imagine that ), but sour cream doesn’t really go well with this soup. Don’t know why. What I do instead, I mix some mayo with lemon juice and use a teaspoon of the mixture when serving. That kind saves the step of adding lemon/lemon juice.
Obviously the recipe is easily multiplied. It is easily reheated, but if you put rice in the soup it will be way overcooked.

P.S. In a good Georgian tradition, soup has to be spicy.

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Old 10-11-2017, 05:25 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Was not sure if I should put this in soups, or here. Since it is ethnic dish, I'm adding to this forum. If administration decides otherwise please move to soups. In all the truth, I thought I have posted this recipe before, but I could not find.

Kcharcho, or Harcho is a most common Georgian soup that was found in restaurants back in Soviet days, and from what I understand it is still very popular. Here is the recipe.

Kcharco/Harco/Charcho-TNT

Beef – 2 pounds
Water – 4 quarts
Ripe tomatoes, peeled and diced – 1 pound
Onion, small to medium, chopped/diced – 2-3
Lemon, sliced and cut in halves – 1
Tomato paste – 2 table spoons
Cilantro, chopped – 1 small bunch
Parsley, chopped – 1 small bunch
Bay leaves – 3
Garlic, crushed – 4-5 cloves
Hot red pepper, like cane or similar
Salt
Oil for sautéing
Rice – 1 cup

Directions:
Wash and cut up meat. Cook in 4 quarts of water, simmering till completely cook. Make sure to peak the dirty foam forming on the top while cooking. After it stops foaming I like to add bay leaves. Separately sauté the chopped onions adding tomato paste.
When meat is done add sautéed onions, tomatoes, herbs and garlic. Add salt and pepper, to taste. Bring back to boil add rice. Cook for 20 minutes.
To serve put the slice of lemon on the side of the plate, so the people can squeeze the juice into soup. Alternatively, you can simply add lemon juice to soup during cooking.

Notes: I found out that cooking rice in the soup doesn’t work for me. I like to cook rice separately and just add to bowl/plate when serving. Also you can add some fresh herbs directly into plate in addition to what is already in the pot.
Being from Ukraine, soup has to be served with Sour Cream (imagine that ), but sour cream doesn’t really go well with this soup. Don’t know why. What I do instead, I mix some mayo with lemon juice and use a teaspoon of the mixture when serving. That kind saves the step of adding lemon/lemon juice.
Obviously the recipe is easily multiplied. It is easily reheated, but if you put rice in the soup it will be way overcooked.

P.S. In a good Georgian tradition, soup has to be spicy.
Hey Charlie, this sounds good. I do have a couple questions.

1) How thick do you cut the lemon slices, before cutting in half?

2) I understand what pepper you are referring to (cayenne), but others might not, can you clarify and how much do you start with?

3) I believe by "peak" you mean "skim off", is that correct?

Not trying to pick on your spelling or meaning, just wanted to make sure others understand.
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:54 PM   #3
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I was stumped by the "cane" pepper.

It does sound like a good soup.
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Old 10-12-2017, 07:41 PM   #4
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I don't see what's Ethnic about this soup at all.. Just looks like standard beef with rice soup to me! My mother is Czeck and it is more crazy than this.
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Old 10-14-2017, 08:36 AM   #5
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Thank you, CharlieD. Also, It's very important for Georgian dishes, to have Georgian spices, they are making that unique taste. For example cilantro, khmeli suneli
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Old 10-15-2017, 02:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Hey Charlie, this sounds good. I do have a couple questions.

1) How thick do you cut the lemon slices, before cutting in half?

2) I understand what pepper you are referring to (cayenne), but others might not, can you clarify and how much do you start with?

3) I believe by "peak" you mean "skim off", is that correct?

Not trying to pick on your spelling or meaning, just wanted to make sure others understand.


Feel free to pick on my spelling any time. I will only appreciate.
1. Maybe 3/16 of an inch. Never really thought about. Kind of cut the same way I cut lemon for ice water or tea.
2. Can’t really help you there. Everyone has different tolerance for spicy food. Use your own discretion. Thus “to taste”.
3. Yes, thank you, “skim off” it is.
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Old 10-15-2017, 02:59 PM   #7
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Thank you, CharlieD. Also, It's very important for Georgian dishes, to have Georgian spices, they are making that unique taste. For example cilantro, khmeli suneli


Yes, thank you. Khmeli suneli is important. Thoug, I never seen it here.
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Old 10-15-2017, 02:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
I was stumped by the "cane" pepper.

It does sound like a good soup.


Sorry, meant to say cayenne pepper. Autocorrect.
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Old 10-15-2017, 03:07 PM   #9
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I love cayenne pepper. I even grow my own. But, you are right about "to taste," as it is a pretty powerful pepper.

CD
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Old 10-16-2017, 04:50 AM   #10
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Yes, thank you. Khmeli suneli is important. Thoug, I never seen it here.
Yeah, looks like it's only possible to find them in Georgian stores with Georgian owners
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