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Old 04-01-2006, 08:08 PM   #11
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Hi Breezy, it's strictly preference. For me white vinegar does a better job of curdling. As far as breakage goes it will not break as much if it is not extremely dry. I like to press it under weight (as I indicated) and then wrap it in a plastic film and refrigerate it. It stays moist that way. Then cut and carefully pan fry.
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Old 04-07-2006, 01:21 PM   #12
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Could you substitute peas for spinach? I've tried to make Saag several times and have always failed miserably. I wonder if this would be a viable alternative.
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Old 04-07-2006, 03:27 PM   #13
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Vyapti what you are referring to is saag paneer and not matter paneer. The preparation technique is very different. Try using this recipe for saag. I don't know why you had disasters but this is a simple enough saag recipe. You can make it with or without paneer. All of the ingredients used in my recipe are available at your local grocery store.

1 tbsp of oil (any will do)
1 large onion finely chopped
3 bunches of fresh spinach (washed several times) and then roughly chopped
Note: You can substitute with 2 packets of chopped frozen spinach, I just prefer fresh
1 jalapeno pepper roughly chopped or more if you like it spicy
2 large tomatoes roughly chopped
salt to taste

In a saute pan, add the oil. Once the oil is hot add the onions and jalapenos and cook it until the onions are lightly browned. Add the tomatoes and cook them for 5 minutes until they get mushy. Next add spinach and salt to your liking. Let the spinach saute for 10 minutes covered in the saute pan. Turn off the heat.

Now comes the next part and the ingredients needed are as follows:

Pureed spinach (You actually take the spinach from step one and puree it in a blender or with a hand blender)
4 cloves of garlic finely chopped
2 tsp of whole cumin seeds
3 tbsp of butter
1 cup of heavy cream

In a saute pan, add the butter. Once the butter is lightly brown. Add the cumin seeds and garlic and saute them for a minute until you smell the garlic and cumins toasting in the butter. Next add the pureed spinach and heavy cream and let it simmer on low for 20 minutes. You can enjoy this with any flatbread.

This is a recipe for saag (spinach) part. In Indian restaurants they prepare saag using a similar technique and then pan fry paneer (they way I indicated in my earlier responses) and then just place them in the saag. I personally am not a huge paneer fan and like the saag by itself. It's like a spicy creamy spinach.
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Old 04-07-2006, 03:30 PM   #14
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Thank You! Thank You!

I will try it this weekend.
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Old 04-10-2006, 05:06 AM   #15
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Yakuta - Mattar means "pea" in hindi, yes? Once you have the sauce, the sky's the limit? Is the sauce different depending on the vegetable (or legume) you put in? Because quite honestly, it's the sauce of Mattar Paneer that I'm in love with. I couldn't be happier if I could just have the cheese, sauce and rice.
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Old 04-10-2006, 08:46 AM   #16
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Hi Velochic, yes Mattar means peas. You can use the same gravy/sauce in combination with other veggies.

I gave you a recipe for a sauce that's pretty basic. You can even try variations to the sauce by doing the following:

Use some ground sweet cashews in addition to the cream. Use a pinch of fenugreek seeds powdered (also called Methi) in the sauce along with other spices. It's extremely bitter (so don't put it in your mouth) but a pinch goes a long way to give the gravy a restaurant taste plus it's supposed to be a good digestive.

I use a similar sauce for meat (mainly chicken) or veggies. It's not your everday sauce since it has some cream in it but once in a while it does not hurt.
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