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Old 06-03-2005, 09:19 PM   #1
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Middle Eastern Desserts

I know there is a dessert section, but I am looking for a specific ethnic dessert. If I am in the wrong section, I apologize.
I do not remember the name of this mouth watering dessert, so I am having trouble finding the recipe. It is made with honey and a spagetti looking crispy noodle type medium. there was also pistachios on it. It is not Baklava, but the ingredients were similar. If anyone can help, It would be greatly appreciated. Also, where can one buy the honey used on these types of desserts. It was not like regular store bought honey.

Thanks in advance!

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Old 06-03-2005, 10:50 PM   #2
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This sounds like what you're looking for. It's made with shredded phyllo dough called Kadaif or kataifyi or similar depending on the country or region.

Kadaif



1 Lb Kadaif Dough
1/4 Lb Butter
1/4 Lb Unsalted Butter
1 1/8 C Finely Chopped Walnuts
1/8 C Sugar
1 tsp Cinnamon
Dash Nutmeg
1 1/2 C Sugar
3/4 C Water
1/2 tsp Lemon Juice

Preheat the oven to 375Ί F. Use a 15” round pan or equivalent for the large recipe. (Approximately 175 sq. in.) Use a 13”x9” pan for the half recipe. Do not use a non-stick surface pan as the Kadaif is cut into squares in the pan using a sharp knife.

Set the butter in a warm spot to melt.

Break or cut the dough into 1” to 1.5” pieces and separate clumps. Drizzle the melted butter over the dough and toss to distribute the butter.

Combine the nuts, Ό C of sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg in a bowl.

Spread half the dough in the pan. Press it down gently. Distribute the nut mixture over the dough. Distribute the remaining dough on top and press it down gently.

Bake it for 25 minutes or longer (it could take up to 40 min.) - until the top is golden brown. Turn the pan around after about 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and cool for 10 minutes.

While the Kadaif is cooling, combine the 3 C of sugar with the water and lemon juice. Bring it to a boil and simmer for 1 minute.

Spoon the hot syrup over the Kadaif after the 10 min. of cooling. Take care to cover the entire surface evenly. Don’t miss the edges.

Cover immediately with plastic wrap followed by foil. Cool completely. Then cut the Kadaif into 2 inch squares using a sharp knife. The cook gets the edge pieces.

Store at room temperature. May be frozen.
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Old 06-04-2005, 11:28 AM   #3
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almost the same recipe is also called kunafa,so you might want to search that dessert either under kataifi or kunafa's name...
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Old 06-04-2005, 04:42 PM   #4
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My husband is from Turkey and he loves this. There are actually a lot of different desserts called Kadayif. Tel kadayif is the one like angle hair pasta. There's also Ekmek kadayif, which is made with a special kind of bread dough that has gum (or something) in it. You can't make it at home from phyllo dough. There is a Turkish grocery in the US that sells the dough. It's

www.bestturkishfood.com

You'll go to the baking goods tab and click on "doughs". They call it Kataifi.

Here's a good link to recipes: http://www.searchturkey.com/TURKEY/F...serts.htm#teld
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Old 06-04-2005, 05:55 PM   #5
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Wow!!! You guys are awesome! Thanks for all the posts. I have been wanting this recipe for so long, and I can't wait to try it for myself. I doubt it will be as good as the one the Lebanese woman makes, but I'll just have to practice!!!!
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Old 06-04-2005, 11:12 PM   #6
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MellieKay:

Give it a try! You'll find it's not nearly as difficult as you imagine.

Living in NJ, you should be able to find an ethnic market (Turkish, Greek, Armenian, Middle Eastern, etc.) that carries the katayif dough. It's sold in 1 pound packages just like phyllo dough.

Also, the recipe I posted, is just one variety. You can search the web and find some variations if you like.
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Old 06-06-2005, 12:42 AM   #7
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I know there is a bakery called the Phoenician Bakery near the place where I first fell in love with this desert. I'm going to have to call to see if they stock it. If not, yellow pages, here I come!!!
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Old 06-12-2005, 12:07 PM   #8
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Your post inspired my dh to make it last night. It was the first time I had ever eaten it homemade (we usually get it when we are in Turkey visiting family). He made Tel Kadaif and it tasted just like baklava. Nothing special. Unless it's something special, don't knock yourself out... just make baklava.
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Old 06-12-2005, 11:16 PM   #9
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When I had baklava I didn't like it. I will say that it was at the same restaurant and when I ordered the Tel Kadaif the restaurant was under new ownership. I haven't baked anything recently, it's too hot in the kitchen without the oven on!! lol

You have made me want to go back and try this woman's baklava. Maybe the previous owner wasn't as good of a baker because this Tel Kadaif that I had was so good my mouth is watering right now just thinking about it.

P.S. What is Turkey like? The only place I have been that's out of the country, apart from the tropics, has been Italy. It must be great when there is family to visit.
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Old 06-20-2005, 06:48 AM   #10
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i think this is called aych al saraya, and not knafa
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