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Old 09-13-2011, 01:54 AM   #1
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Mole amarillo oaxaqueño

MOLE AMARILLO OAXAQUEÑO:



Ingredients :
1 chicken, cut into pieces
1 medium onion, chopped
3 medium garlic cloves, crushed
Salt
3 medium chayote
1/2 pound green beans
For the mole:
2 anchos
12 guajillos or 6 chilcostles
10 tomatillos
1 large green roma tomato
1/2 medium onion
4 medium garlic cloves, unpeeled
8 whole black peppercorns
4 whole cloves
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2 cup masa harina
1 cup water
4 large fresh hoja santa leaves or 6 sprigs cilantro
Rajas de chile:
3 chiles de agua or 1 jalapeño and 2 chiles Magdalenas
1/2 cup vegetable oil, for frying
10 pearl onions
1/2 cup lime juice
1 teaspoon dried Mexican orégano, preferably Oaxaqueño
Salt
Cooked white rice, as accompaniment
Heated tortillas, as accompaniment
Directions:
Clean the chicken pieces and place them in a stockpot with boiling water, onion, garlic, and salt, reduce the heat and poach the chicken until tender about 30 minutes. Remove chicken and reserve broth.

Heat 2 pots of water to boiling. Add salt. Add chayote to 1 pot and green beans to the other. Cook each to al dente. Drain. Slice chayote and set both aside.

For the Mole: Clean the anchos and guajillos with a damp cloth, cut them open, remove the seeds and stems, and spread them flat. Roast them on a hot comal or thin skillet. Remove from the skillet and place in a bowl of hot water and soak for 20 minutes.

On the same comal or skillet dry-roast the tomatillos, tomato, onion, and unpeeled garlic, remove the garlic when black spots appear and peel it, and leave the vegetables until blistered and soft.

In a small skillet, lightly roast the black peppercorns, cloves, and cumin until the aroma is released.

Transfer the reconstituted chiles to the blender with enough water to process. Meanwhile, heat 3 tablespoons oil in large pan and pour the chile mixture through a sieve into the hot pan, it is important that all the pieces of chile skin are blended or removed so the sauce will be smooth. Reduce the heat and let it simmer for 8 minutes.

While frying the chile mixture, blend all the roasted vegetables and roasted spices with enough water to puree. Add this mixture to the frying chile paste, let it simmer for about 20 minutes or until it is reduced. Add reserved chicken broth and simmer for 5 minutes. Dilute masa harina in 1 cup water and add to mixture. Let it cook 10 minutes, check for salt. Add the cooked chicken, peeled and sliced chayote and green beans and cook until heated through. Add hoja santa or cilantro.

For the rajas de chile: Make a small slit in each of the chiles, fry them in hot oil, until all sides are blistered. Remove from oil. Let them cool down and remove the skin, discard it along with seed and stems, tear in pieces, and place the strips in a serving bowl, quarter the pearl onions, and add to the chiles along with lime juice, oregano, and salt.

Serve with white rice and hot tortillas along with the rajas de chile.

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Old 09-13-2011, 03:13 AM   #2
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Thank you!

I'm afraid that finding the ingredients will be very, very hard for me...
Now I'm gonna google some of them I'v never heard of!
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Old 09-13-2011, 11:05 AM   #3
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I almost didn't read this, as I first thought you posted "Armadillo" .
Oh G+d, I think they are the ugliest things I've ever seen.

I would say this is a "kitchen sink" (everything but) recipe , with lots of love time needed.

Thanks for posting, tzotzil.
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:14 PM   #4
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Haha,
maybe you mean the chayotes and the chiles chicostles.
But surely as well as we find a corona beer all around the world,you will find them ,or at least, you will find a similar version in your location with other name.

Greetings,Luca
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:22 PM   #5
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You welcome, 2old.

By the way,let me say there is a dish of armadillo wich is usual in the South of Mexico.

Although I don't agree too much with the hunting of species for making exotic dish,I have to mention it.

Thanks.
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Old 09-13-2011, 12:33 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tzotzil View Post
You welcome, 2old.

By the way,let me say there is a dish of armadillo which is usual in the South of Mexico.

Although I don't agree too much with the hunting of species for making exotic dish,I have to mention it.

Thanks.
The only reason I haven't tried Armadillo meat is because of it being the only natural carrier of Leprosy (Hanson's Disease). The only cases of Leprosy noted now are as a result of people eating underdone or mishandled raw armadillo meat and the carcasses.

I just can't get past that.

I wish I could, because the damn things are a real infestation nuisance here in Florida. They dig under the house foundation and put small holes all over my yard.

The disease carrying organism "Mycobacteriumleprae" is mostly carried and spread through the mucous of infected people and animals. Since the armadillos dig soft earth with their snouts, I figure the small holes are probably full of the nasties.

Holy Yuck Batman!
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Old 09-13-2011, 02:55 PM   #7
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Thanks,Tim.
More reasons for not trying to eat some kind of animals if we are not in a survival situation.
Here,in the countryside the people who install their cabins and houses,are killing species like the snakes. There are not many víboras de cascabel nowadays.
In the past our native northern indigenous sometimes ate them , but now everything is a matter of superstition or fear.
The truth is that we are occupying the land of the animals; or even worse,the devastation of the nature makes the species to migrate looking for food and refuge.

Santa Devastación,Batman.
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Old 09-13-2011, 05:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tzotzil View Post
Thanks,Tim.
More reasons for not trying to eat some kind of animals if we are not in a survival situation.
Here,in the countryside the people who install their cabins and houses,are killing species like the snakes. There are not many víboras de cascabel nowadays.
In the past our native northern indigenous sometimes ate them , but now everything is a matter of superstition or fear.
The truth is that we are occupying the land of the animals; or even worse,the devastation of the nature makes the species to migrate looking for food and refuge.

Santa Devastación,Batman.
Holy Devastation indeed, tzotzil!

Mankind is the only creature on earth that is aware of causing it's own future death and not seeming to care enough to stop it.

"I have mine and I don't care about anyone else" seems to be everyone's logic these days.

Man, you need to come to Florida if you want Rattlesnakes. We have plenty!

Here's one that was caught just down the road from my house:
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Old 09-13-2011, 05:38 PM   #9
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Tzotsil, has shared a fantastic recipe here..

I know it looks complicated, but Mole is not hard..

Think Indian Curry, it's very close..

There are really only 3 Ingredients to Mole...

Also, I think the word Mole simply means Sauce, so you can "Mole" anything.. Chicken usually, but beef or pork, shrimp or even vegitables..

and for Luca, Bollaise, and Pecanis... you will never be able to make this exact recipe..

every Abualita (Litttle Grandma) makes this differently... Use the things that grow near you...

I have no Idea what type of peppers are availible in Canada, or Serbia... Ramps fo NJ. use the locall stuff!

Here's my recipe..

1. Spices and peppers...what ever grows in your Grandmaw's back yard in the fall...dry them out then grind them in a blender...

not often Hot, but spicy...

2. Nuts...

Pumpkin seeds are very traditional, but anything will work... Almonds, Pistacios, any oily nut... Peanuts work well, but carefull here of allargies.. but even a jar of Peannut Butter works well..

3. Chocolat.. not like American Chocolatt chips.. but more like Bittersweet Chocolatt

just a bit, In Mexico a Cup of Hot Chocolat is more like a cup of Esspresso

so make this Mole Paste and set it asside

Cut up a whole chicken and brown it well, then stew it with your favorite veggies..

then add the paste for the last 1 hour..

You think it would be served over rice or noodles..

But it's normally served on it's own with a side of rice, red/yellow with saffron and a bowl of very wet Borracho Beans..

Thank You Tzotzil!

Eric, Austin, Tx.
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Old 09-13-2011, 06:14 PM   #10
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"and for Luca, Bollaise, and Pecanis... you will never be able to make this exact recipe.."

Did you bring me into this thread? I didn't even reply here
I buy Dondé Maria Molé.
I could never find half of these ingredients where I live
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Mole amarillo oaxaqueño [B]MOLE AMARILLO OAXAQUEÑO:[/B] [B]Ingredients :[/B] [B]1 chicken, cut into pieces[/B] [B]1 medium onion, chopped[/B] [B]3 medium garlic cloves, crushed[/B] [B]Salt[/B] [B]3 medium chayote[/B] [B]1/2 pound green beans[/B] [B]For the mole:[/B] [B]2 anchos[/B] [B]12 guajillos or 6 chilcostles[/B] [B]10 tomatillos[/B] [B]1 large green roma tomato[/B] [B]1/2 medium onion[/B] [B]4 medium garlic cloves, unpeeled[/B] [B]8 whole black peppercorns[/B] [B]4 whole cloves[/B] [B]1 teaspoon cumin seeds [/B] [B]3 tablespoons vegetable oil[/B] [B]1/2 cup masa harina[/B] [B]1 cup water[/B] [B]4 large fresh hoja santa leaves or 6 sprigs cilantro[/B] [B]Rajas de chile:[/B] [B]3 chiles de agua or 1 jalapeño and 2 chiles Magdalenas[/B] [B]1/2 cup vegetable oil, for frying [/B] [B]10 pearl onions[/B] [B]1/2 cup lime juice[/B] [B]1 teaspoon dried Mexican orégano, preferably Oaxaqueño[/B] [B]Salt[/B] [B]Cooked white rice, as accompaniment[/B] [B]Heated tortillas, as accompaniment[/B] [B]Directions:[/B] [B]Clean the chicken pieces and place them in a stockpot with boiling water, onion, garlic, and salt, reduce the heat and poach the chicken until tender about 30 minutes. Remove chicken and reserve broth.[/B] [B]Heat 2 pots of water to boiling. Add salt. Add chayote to 1 pot and green beans to the other. Cook each to al dente. Drain. Slice chayote and set both aside.[/B] [B]For the Mole: Clean the anchos and guajillos with a damp cloth, cut them open, remove the seeds and stems, and spread them flat. Roast them on a hot comal or thin skillet. Remove from the skillet and place in a bowl of hot water and soak for 20 minutes. [/B] [B]On the same comal or skillet dry-roast the tomatillos, tomato, onion, and unpeeled garlic, remove the garlic when black spots appear and peel it, and leave the vegetables until blistered and soft. [/B] [B]In a small skillet, lightly roast the black peppercorns, cloves, and cumin until the aroma is released. [/B] [B]Transfer the reconstituted chiles to the blender with enough water to process. Meanwhile, heat 3 tablespoons oil in large pan and pour the chile mixture through a sieve into the hot pan, it is important that all the pieces of chile skin are blended or removed so the sauce will be smooth. Reduce the heat and let it simmer for 8 minutes. [/B] [B]While frying the chile mixture, blend all the roasted vegetables and roasted spices with enough water to puree. Add this mixture to the frying chile paste, let it simmer for about 20 minutes or until it is reduced. Add reserved chicken broth and simmer for 5 minutes. Dilute masa harina in 1 cup water and add to mixture. Let it cook 10 minutes, check for salt. Add the cooked chicken, peeled and sliced chayote and green beans and cook until heated through. Add hoja santa or cilantro.[/B] [B]For the rajas de chile: Make a small slit in each of the chiles, fry them in hot oil, until all sides are blistered. Remove from oil. Let them cool down and remove the skin, discard it along with seed and stems, tear in pieces, and place the strips in a serving bowl, quarter the pearl onions, and add to the chiles along with lime juice, oregano, and salt.[/B] [B]Serve with white rice and hot tortillas along with the rajas de chile. [/B] 3 stars 1 reviews
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