"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-06-2006, 02:47 PM   #1
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Mustard Oil

While I haven't yet checked for this at my nearest ethnic market, does anyone here purchase it - & have a brand they can recommend - or make it themselves?

__________________

__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 03:45 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking
While I haven't yet checked for this at my nearest ethnic market, does anyone here purchase it - & have a brand they can recommend - or make it themselves?
You can make it yourself. Grapeseed oil makes the best medium because of it's neutral flavor and color, although canola or extra-light olive oil will work well too. Depending on what kind of flavor you want, you can use a dry mustard like Colmans, or use toasted and ground mustard seeds. Use about 1/2 cup of powder for every 1 cup of oil for a nice, intense flavor. Use more oil or less powder if you want a more subtle flavor. Heat the oil to about 170 degrees, then remove from the heat, add the mustard and let steep for 20 minutes to extract the flavors. Strain and keep in the fridge for up to two weeks.
__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 07:27 PM   #3
Sous Chef
 
cliveb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Caracas, Venezuela
Posts: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironchef
You can make it yourself. Grapeseed oil makes the best medium because of it's neutral flavor and color, although canola or extra-light olive oil will work well too. Depending on what kind of flavor you want, you can use a dry mustard like Colmans, or use toasted and ground mustard seeds. Use about 1/2 cup of powder for every 1 cup of oil for a nice, intense flavor. Use more oil or less powder if you want a more subtle flavor. Heat the oil to about 170 degrees, then remove from the heat, add the mustard and let steep for 20 minutes to extract the flavors. Strain and keep in the fridge for up to two weeks.

I don't know if that's correct or not, because I haven't tasted yours, ironchef, but Mustard Oil is used extensively in Indian food. I've tried to make my own and it doesn't even come close to the original.

Buy Mustard Oil in your local Indian Grocery store. Never mind what it says on the label about "not for human consumption" - there are at least 500,000,000 Indian food consumers out there ( including myself) who have eaten Mustard Oil without any side effects.

The smell is nose-tingling. The food you prepare with it is exotic, slightly spicy, very yummy...
__________________
cliveb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2006, 07:40 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
Yakuta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,208
Just like the Chinese, Indians also believe in the cooling and warm properties of certain foods. Per Indians, mustard is considered to be something that is warm on your system and to be used in moderation.

It is normally used to make preparations that you will see eaten in the colder months so that the warmer effects it has on your body is balanced by the weather outside.

Mostly used in North India (cooler) and used to make saags (spinach and mustard greens). It is very strong and an acquired taste so it's best to use it sparingly.
__________________
Yakuta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 08:16 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by cliveb
I don't know if that's correct or not, because I haven't tasted yours, ironchef, but Mustard Oil is used extensively in Indian food. I've tried to make my own and it doesn't even come close to the original.
No, my version is more of an infused oil that I would use to dress a plate and to add another layer of flavor to a dish, not the type that you're referring to.
__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 09:24 AM   #6
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
That's interesting IC, and one I shall try! I never thought of doing that one before! I use the "other" mustard oil in my Frim Fram Sauce for Seafood Diana, and it packs quite a little wallop....
__________________

__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.