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Old 04-13-2005, 03:18 PM   #11
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Thanks Yakuta! I was hoping you would see this post and lend your expertise . I would love to try a fresh curry next. My problem will be finding the ingredients. I do not think I have ever seen curry leaves around here (I am sort of in the boonies), but I am sure once the weather is nice I could take a ride to Boston and find what I need. Actually now that I think of it, I do remember my local nursery selling curry plants last year. Maybe I will plant some this time around.
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Old 04-13-2005, 03:21 PM   #12
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[QUOTE=Yakuta]Hi GB, I understand this is your first attempt and I am sure it will come out fine with the suggestions you got so far. If you enjoy this version do give another version a try. The second time around get braver :-) and buy some fresh spices and items such as curry leaves, mustard seeds, fenugreek seeds, whole dried red chillies that give curries such a unique flavor. I can post many many recipes but I think the essence of a true simple curry has been captured by Sarah. I like to give my curries a change from your normal by using yogurt, cream, ground nuts , caramalized onions and sour cream (I think you have heard me mention that before) for a milder creamier taste. Also contrary to what you may have heard, ghee is not essential for cooking curries, it's good if you have it but you don't absolutely need it. I have been out of India for almost 17 years now and have seldomly used ghee.

i dont use ghee either yakuta! infact i prefer vegetable oil,ghee makes a curry look like jelly if its a little cold,plus i forgot to mention that i use yogurt too,it certainly does enhance the flavor,and instead of whole red chillies,i use fresh,fragrant green peppers and lots of fresh corriander or cilantro leaves and a little additional chopped ginger as a garnish really makes it taste a lot yummier...
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Old 04-13-2005, 03:39 PM   #13
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GB, curry leaves are available at an Indian store and I am sure Boston (which has a large Indian population) should have some. I also have a small plant that I ordered from a nursery called Logees (www.Logees.com) in Philadelphia. It arrived at my doorstep. It's called Murraya Koeniji (botanical name) and is different from a curry plant.

Curry leaf plant is a rather slow growing plant and for those of us who live in the colder part of the country it's even more difficult to keep it healthy through the winter months.

I will post a unique recipe if you get your hands on it that you will surely enjoy and it's a very simple curry with minimal ingredients and most of them can be bought at your local grocer (except the curry leaves and brown whole mustard seeds).
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Old 04-13-2005, 03:52 PM   #14
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Well I am halfway thee Yakuta. I already have the brown whole mustard seeds . My wife just informed me that we actually have an Indian grocery store not far from our house (you really do learn something new every day) so I am sure they will have what I need there!
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Old 04-13-2005, 03:59 PM   #15
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What I use is probably not actual ghee, but plain clarified butter.

Anyway, GB, I have done what Yakuta suggests and the difference when using fresh spices ground right before you use them is phenomenal.

There is an Indian grocery store in Coolidge Corner that I go to, if there aren't any out by you. They sell curry leaves and all the other stuff.
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Old 04-13-2005, 04:11 PM   #16
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O.K. then here goes my recipe. My husband and boys say this is my signature chicken dish. I can make it with my eyes closed (and you can too) and it will come out perfect. All my friends (from the west and the east alike) love it and it's easy easy with the right ingredients (no substitutions):

Chicken - One whole cut up (discard the skin), wash and keep aside
Heavy cream (the smallest carton available in the grocery store)
3 cups of tomato sauce (canned any brand will do)
1 tbsp of oil (I use canola but you can use any you like)
1 large or 2 small sprigs of curry leaves
2 tbsp of whole brown mustard seeds
5 whole arabol red chillies (available in any hispanic isle of your grocery store or you can get it from the Indian store). Ensure you do not break them (as they can be super spicy, you just want to absorb the spice from the skin and not the seeds)
salt to taste
1 tsp of fresh ginger paste
cilantro for garnish


In a saute pan, add the oil. Once it's smoking hot, reduce the heat and throw in the mustard seeds, curry leaves and whole chillies and cover immediately (its O.K. if they almost turn black with the heat).

Now increase the heat and pour in the tomato sauce and add the chicken and minced ginger and salt to taste. Cover and let the chicken cook for 20 minutes or so. Add the cream, stir, cover and let it cook for another 20-25 minutes on low heat.

Garnish with cilantro and enjoy the wonderful flavors with a very tiny hint of spice. I prefer to eat this with naan or homemade rotis but basmati rice can be great with it too.
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Old 04-13-2005, 04:19 PM   #17
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This sounds amazing!!! Thanks Yakuta
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Old 04-13-2005, 04:44 PM   #18
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That does sound really, really good!
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Old 04-13-2005, 05:20 PM   #19
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Guys, I think the true proof lies in the taste so try and it and see what you think. What attracted me initially to this recipe is it's simplicity and unique ingredients. Normally mustard seeds, curry leaves and whole chillies are never used in your normal curries. All I had to do it try it with an open mind and now I am a convert. I have tried many many recipes but I still keep coming back to this one.

I have to thank my mother in law for this one. She was wonderful to make this when I visited her and share her recipe with me.
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Old 04-14-2005, 10:03 AM   #20
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Update

Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
I would rub the curry powder into the chicken.

Then cook the onions/garlic in some ghee. Then I would add curry powder and cook that in the ghee, too.

Then I would add water or chix stock and the potatoes; when potatoes are nearly done add greeen beans and chicken back to cook. Then add coconut milk (most recipes using it call for you to add it at the very end).
OK here is an update. I made it list Jenny suggested above and it came out great. My wife claims to not like Indian food (but I have to give her credit as she does try it as often as I ask her to). It is mostly the way it looks that turns her off, but also sometimes the smell. Well I told her I wanted to try this recipe, but I was worried that she would not like it. She said she was willing to try it, but that I should not be offended if she ended up making a sandwich for dinner. Well she tried it and she LOVED it. She mentioned many times during dinner how good it was. That is the biggest compliment I could ever hope for
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