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Old 01-14-2006, 10:44 AM   #1
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NOT Toad in the Hole... Help!

I tried to do a search for a recipe, THINKING that you call it Toad in the Hole over there on your island nation. Nope. What is Toad in the Hole, I thought was Bangers and Mash. Anyway, now that I have my culinary terms correct... I don't know what this is called and can't google for it.

The recipe I'm looking for is basically a roast beef and pud, but the Yorkshire pud is the actual BOWL that the roast beef is in. I'm trying to figure out how to make the pud into this bowl shape. Do any of you Brits, Scots, Welsh or Irish have some help for this yankee expat?

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Old 01-14-2006, 11:28 AM   #2
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Make your yorkshire pudding in individual

cups, like popovers, which is basically what they are.
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Old 01-14-2006, 12:48 PM   #3
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No, no, no. I can do it in the little cups. I'm looking for the recipe to make it in a big bowl shape. I've never seen it anywhere but in the UK, at a pub.
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Old 01-14-2006, 05:44 PM   #4
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Make up a traditional Yorkshire pudding mix (I'm almost certain I've posted it on here at some time). Then, instead of making it in individual roasting dishes or bun dishes, use a larger baking pan, suitable say, for making an 6 or 7 inch sponge.

Whilst it's cooking, slice some roast beef, make an onion gravy... Voila - large sized yorkshire puds with roast beef in onion gravy.

I know I've posted a Toad in the Hole recipe here, too.
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Old 01-15-2006, 11:03 AM   #5
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Ishbel, Daisy... thank you. I will let you know how it turns out.
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Old 01-15-2006, 12:54 PM   #6
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Hi, I've made this yorkshire recipe for my husband and he LOVED it. Also, try drizzling heavy cream and honey over the pudding, saw it done on Nigella Bites, Very yummy!!

oops...so sorry for not mentioning the author, this recipe is by nigell Lawson, author of Nigella Bites. I hope the copyright police doesn't get me. =)

Weekend: Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding

Roast Beef:
1 pound per person
Dry mustard

Yorkshire Pudding:
1 1/4 cups of milk
4 eggs
Scant 1/2 teaspoon of salt
Freshly milled black pepper
1 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour, sifted
1 tablespoon of beef dripping or vegetable oil to taste

Roast Beef: I think many people underplay how much meat you need. For six people, I wouldn't consider getting under five pounds, which, in other words, is about a pound per person. A roast is a sad prospect without the possibility of leftovers. For a rib, you should add on about two pounds extra here.

For rare meat, you can either cook the beef at 475° F for 15 minutes and then turn it down to 350° F for about 15 minutes per pound--or cook at 425° F throughout for about 15 minutes per pound. I usually do 15 minutes per pound and then add on an extra five minutes, so that those who don't like rare meat have a bit of slightly more cooked beef from the ends. Those who don't like blood don't have to get it; the rest of us gratifyingly do. Use a meat thermometer to determine doneness exactly. The internal temperature for rare beef is 120° F; for medium-rare, it is 125° F-130° F; for medium it is 140° F.

All I do to the beef is massage it with dry mustard powder after I've taken it out of the fridge. I use a knob of dripping for the pan, but you could use whatever fat or oil you have at hand.

Yorkshire Pudding: The oven should be heated to 450° F. Mix the milk, eggs and salt and add pepper, beating all well together. I use my freestanding mixer, the fabulous KitchenAidTM, but any hand-held electric mixer (rotary or balloon whisk) will do. Let these ingredients stand for 15 minutes and then whisk in the flour. Meanwhile, add the dripping to the pan and put it in the oven to heat for about 10 minutes. Into this intensely hot pan, you should put the batter and cook for 20 minutes or until well puffed and golden. Bring it, triumphant, to the table.
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Old 01-15-2006, 04:38 PM   #7
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I can make the pud in single servings. I know how to make it. It was making it into the shape of a bowl that I was looking for. Ishbel gave me what I was looking for.
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Old 01-15-2006, 07:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luv4Prada
Hi, I've made this yorkshire recipe for my husband and he LOVED it. Also, try drizzling heavy cream and honey over the pudding, saw it done on Nigella Bites, Very yummy!!

Weekend: Roast Beef with Yorkshire Pudding

Roast Beef:
1 pound per person
Dry mustard

Yorkshire Pudding:
1 1/4 cups of milk
4 eggs
Scant 1/2 teaspoon of salt
Freshly milled black pepper
1 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour, sifted
1 tablespoon of beef dripping or vegetable oil to taste

Roast Beef: I think many people underplay how much meat you need. For six people, I wouldn't consider getting under five pounds, which, in other words, is about a pound per person. A roast is a sad prospect without the possibility of leftovers. For a rib, you should add on about two pounds extra here.

For rare meat, you can either cook the beef at 475 F for 15 minutes and then turn it down to 350 F for about 15 minutes per pound--or cook at 425 F throughout for about 15 minutes per pound. I usually do 15 minutes per pound and then add on an extra five minutes, so that those who don't like rare meat have a bit of slightly more cooked beef from the ends. Those who don't like blood don't have to get it; the rest of us gratifyingly do. Use a meat thermometer to determine doneness exactly. The internal temperature for rare beef is 120 F; for medium-rare, it is 125 F-130 F; for medium it is 140 F.

All I do to the beef is massage it with dry mustard powder after I've taken it out of the fridge. I use a knob of dripping for the pan, but you could use whatever fat or oil you have at hand.

Yorkshire Pudding: The oven should be heated to 450 F. Mix the milk, eggs and salt and add pepper, beating all well together. I use my freestanding mixer, the fabulous KitchenAidTM, but any hand-held electric mixer (rotary or balloon whisk) will do. Let these ingredients stand for 15 minutes and then whisk in the flour. Meanwhile, add the dripping to the pan and put it in the oven to heat for about 10 minutes. Into this intensely hot pan, you should put the batter and cook for 20 minutes or until well puffed and golden. Bring it, triumphant, to the table.
Also, I think there must be some copyright rules about cutting and pasting recipes from other sites without citing them.
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Old 01-15-2006, 08:27 PM   #9
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My grandmother was from England but I have never seen York. Pud. much less tasted it. Can you tell me what it is like? Sort of a bread?
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Old 01-15-2006, 08:48 PM   #10
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They are sooooo good Dove, it's like an American pop-over. Have you ever had those? If not both are light and airy with a taste a tiny bit like unsweetened pancake batter. They are largely hollow when cooked, but still filling at the same time. My mom made these all the time when we were kids, it didn't have to be with roast beef (though sometimes it was). She just used a dab of butter in place of the beef drippings in the bottom of the muffin tins and they turned out fantastically
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