"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-02-2010, 03:28 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Persian Food

Every once in a while I enjoy delving into cookbooks of foreign cuisines to develop a small set of dishes that make "get togethers" interesting. I find that I learn quite a bit reading through cookbooks - especially those that attempt to explain why a cuisine has developed to what it is today through the geography of a region and culture of the people who live there.

So after eating at a bunch of Persian-owned persian restaurants that have been popping up everywhere in my area and buying a few cookbooks, I'm going to try and develop my hand at Persian food. I'm going to make a conscious effort at keeping the food from simply becoming an extension of stereotypical middle-eastern or Greek street food. I found "New Food of Life" by Najmieh Batmanglij to be an excellent resource, and read every page.

So tonight and tomorrow I will be attempting slightly modified versions of...

Homemade Nan-e Barbari
Fresh Panir
Shirazi Salad
Javaher Polow
Veggie Kabobs
Jujeh Kabobs
Kabob-e Kubideh w/Maast-O Khiar

and Walnut Cookies w/Oranges in Syrup

I purchased the sword-like skewers with flat-sides for the Kubideh, and got my order of amazing spices in from an Iranian store.

Pictures and text to come (hopefully by the end of the week).

Any tips out there from veterans of this cuisine?

EDIT: Oh, and I'm also developing a cocktail to match. One thing I learned through reading is that although Muslim culture forbids alcohol, certain minority sub-cultures (that are actually ancient Persian) are allowed to produce wine for personal use. Arak, an anise liqueur is also widely "abused"... ;)

__________________

__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 06:14 AM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Berlin, Germany
Posts: 196
Sounds great!

I havent tried to make any of the above, but did make Khoresht Fesenjan once (chicken, walnut, pomegranite stew type thing) and it turned out fantastic - really tasty and highly recommendable. Though I completely messed up the Persian rice (rice with a golden crust on top - the recipe I found included saffran as well). If you ever try to make the rice, my best tip would be to use a non-stick pan for the browning part. I didnt and, well, you can imagine what happened. Big mess.

Good luck and looking forward to the pictures!
__________________

__________________
flukx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 10:29 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
Mimizkitchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,607
Wow that sounds great, although i've never had persian food, I can't wait to hear your take on these recipes and to see the pictures... Have Fun!!!
__________________
A woman is like a tea bag, you never no how strong she is until you put her in hot water...
Mimizkitchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 07:51 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Quick image of tonight's Nan-e Barbari, Kabab-e Kubideh, and Maast-o Khiar.
My take on it tomorrow.

__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 07:57 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
Mimizkitchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 1,607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas Mosher View Post
Quick image of tonight's Nan-e Barbari, Kabab-e Kubideh, and Maast-o Khiar.
My take on it tomorrow.

HOLY CRAPOLY looks amazing Nick, I want this recipe!!!!
__________________
A woman is like a tea bag, you never no how strong she is until you put her in hot water...
Mimizkitchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2010, 09:20 PM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,401
Hi Nick, looks really good!

For those of us not well versed in Persian food, please provide some info on this dish.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2010, 12:40 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kadesma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: california
Posts: 21,373
You picture make my mouth water. I've had naan and love it will look into making my own. Thanks for sharing
kades
__________________
HEAVEN is Cade, Ethan,Carson, and Olivia,Alyssa,Gianna
kadesma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2010, 10:37 AM   #8
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Not totally traditional in it's arrangement, but I prefer Barbari bread over Lavash for it's juice-absorbing abilities (and texture!). Kabab-e Kubideh is a skewer of seasoned ground beef and lamb that is quickly cooked over hot coals. It is served on flat bread with grilled tomatoes and a Tzatziki-like sauce called Maast-O Khiar (literally yogurt and cucumbers). At restaurants it's often served with rice, but I've saved that dish for tomorrow (and figured correctly that the bread would be more than enough).

I started with the Maast, as it requires some time in the fridge to mature and develop. Deviating from my goal to avoid stereotypes, I went with a thick greek yogurt as a base (what can I say, I prefer it!). Unlike most Tzatzikis I've had, the Maast includes Dill (fresh herbs are used liberally in Persian cuisine it seems). I went easier on the herbs than most recipes, as I find they can become overpowering.

12-oz. Greek Yogurt
1 Large Pickling Cucumber - Shredded & Dewatered
1-t Garlic Paste (Use fresh cloves, salt, and the side of a good knife)
1-t Minced Fresh Mint
1-t Minced Fresh Dill
1/2-t Kosher Salt
1/2-t Freshly Ground Black Pepper

Use a box grater for the (unpeeled) cucumber, and then squeeze out as much water from the product by placing it in a flour-sack towel and twisting. Combine all the ingredients well and refrigerate for a minimum of 3 hours (overnight is best).

The bread recipe I settled on is a cross between Indian Naan and a French Baguette. Traditionally, Nan-e Barbari is supposed to be likened to a wide/short french baguette. I chose to brush it with a Persian lime-infused butter and cook it directly over coals on my Weber. Preparation is similar to a pizza dough...

0.25-oz. Active Dry Yeast
1-C Warm Water
1-T Sugar
1-T Kosher Salt
3-C All-Purpose Flour (More as needed)
1/2-C Melter Butter
Juice of 1 Lime

Whisk the yeast, sugar, and warm water together and set aside for ten minutes. Combine the flour and salt in a stand mixer, then mix on medium-low with the dough-hook, slowly adding the yeast mixture and 1/4-C of melted butter. Gradually increase the speed to medium-high, kneading until the dough appears smooth and elastic (10+ minutes). Add additional flour if needed. When finished, shape the dough into a ball, rub the inside of a large bowl with melted butter, and allow to rise covered with a damp towel for 1.5 hours. Combine the remaining butter and lime juice in a small bowl. Punch the dough down, and divide into four equal portions. Cover with a moist towel and allow to rise again. Roll the dough out into 1/8"-1/4" thick rounds, and brush them lightly with the lime butter. Grill over hot coals, flipping once to finish. The final bread should be crispy, bubbly, and well textured within.

The Kabab-e Kubideh technique involves using large flat skewers that look like primitive swords. I'm guessing this might have something to do with the original cooking technique! A finely ground seasoned forcemeat is molded around the skewers and grilled over the coals - but not touching any grates or racks. I decided that I wanted grill marks, along with a fast sear and corresponding juicy interior so I grilled directly on my grate. Instead of using the $20 swords I bought, I fashioned long (but thin and relatively narrow) patties. These were spectacular, and far superior to any restaurant kababs or gyro-loaf I've tasted. One key is to really squeeze all the moisture from the pureed onions that your arms can manage. Using parchment as a transfer device for the patties works well.

1-lb Ground Lamb Shoulder
1-lb Ground Chuck
1 Large Common Onion
1-T Powdered Sumac (Available from Iranian Shops & Spice Vendors)
1-t Freshly Ground Black Pepper
2-t Kosher Salt
1/2-t Turmeric

Peel and roughly chop the onion, then puree to a very fine mince in a food processor. Pour the contents into a flour sack towel, and remove as much moisture as possible. Return them to the stand mixer and add the ground meats and remaining ingredients. Process to a forcemeat consistency, then wrap in plastic and chill for at least 3 hours. Separate the meat into four portions, and press out on parchment paper to 1/8-1/4" thick strips. Grill over hot coals, turning once. Be sure not to over cook!

In the future I will serve the kababs with rice, but the Nan-e Barabari makes for a faster alternative that resembles a high-end gyro.

I'll be trying the remaining recipes over the next few days.
__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2010, 10:53 AM   #9
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,401
Nick, if you have a potato ricer, they work great for squeezing juice out of onions or cukes. I use one to squeeze the water out of thawed frozen spinach among other things.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2010, 04:30 PM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Nicholas Mosher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 768
Interesting! So do you use cheesecloth or a towel inside? I have a ricer, but I'm not sure if it would hold the onion mince (given it's size) without passing it through. I imagine it would work perfectly with some sort of filter (like the towels I use), and provide significant mechanical leverage for an easier motion.


-----


I keep tearing off pieces of the leftover Kabab and dipping it in the Maast...
__________________

__________________
Nick ~ "Egg whites are good for a lot of things; lemon meringue pie, angel food cake, and clogging up radiators." - MacGyver
Nicholas Mosher is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.