"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-07-2016, 06:13 AM   #21
Sous Chef
 
CakePoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Wexio
Posts: 637
Well Finland got independence from Russia in 1917 and that meant that some families reunited and some moved to Sweden and some moved to Finland. Think of Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland as dysfunctional family, as much we do dislike each other, we love each other too and when bad things happens we unite. And Sweden and Denmark used to invade Norway and each other on a regular basis. Ah , the good old days of Great Sweden. Sweden boarders is only 110 years old. Well Lappland isnt a country, it part of 3 and the Sami "country called Sapmi is part of four countries. It is sort of a country with in countries. Yeah, part sami too.

Anyway, back to potatoes. Instead of doing pirogies, what about palt/ kams or kroppkaka, it like a potato dumpling sometimes filled with pork? Could that do?
__________________

__________________
For the love of Cheese!
CakePoet is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2016, 06:13 PM   #22
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
Larry as far as the dough, Yes I have a recipe. I spent a year in 1991 on an educational exchange in Krasnodar Russia. I have Mrs. Lazko's dough recipe.

... Lessons learned, Russians are insane. But rather good to be around, both for stories, and recipes.

I have the original recipe, but it is in a box that went from the Oklahoma move direct to a storage locker. Let me think about the differences between that and my current recipe. (less lard, by 93%) and we are moving so gonna get back the cookboks and notebooks I sent to storage.

Cheers,

TBS
Totally off topic. My best memory of Krasnodar is bread. Albeit I was there 10 years before you did. But it was amazing. A huge round loaf, like nothing I have seen before. Enough to feed 2-3 hungry families. Snow white and soft as a down pillow. Amazing smell and taste, I will never forget.
__________________

__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2016, 06:15 PM   #23
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakePoet View Post
... there is even a place in Ukraine that still speak an old form of Swedish.
Lived in Ukraine for nearly 30 years, never heard about such thing.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2016, 03:00 AM   #24
Sous Chef
 
CakePoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Wexio
Posts: 637
Starosjvedske part of Zmijivka, apparently the language is dying due Sovjet year and also some where evacuated to Sweden during second world war.

Kams
kilo cooked boiled potatoes
2 egg
200- 500 ml flour barley, rye or wheat
teaspoon salt.

Riced the potatoes, add egg, salt and then knead in the flour until you firm dough.

Make 20 balls and simmer in hot salted water for 10- 15 min.
__________________
For the love of Cheese!
CakePoet is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2016, 11:03 PM   #25
Senior Cook
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
Totally off topic. My best memory of Krasnodar is bread. Albeit I was there 10 years before you did. But it was amazing. A huge round loaf, like nothing I have seen before. Enough to feed 2-3 hungry families. Snow white and soft as a down pillow. Amazing smell and taste, I will never forget.
We got met at the train station in Krasnodar with bread and salt, and also, the city sent a contingent of three to meet us at the airport, which they sent at great expense and inconvenience to make sure we got good Kubanski Krai bread on setting foot in Russia. Great bread there, I have tried to emulate it in my own bread making, and I still have friends there I correspond with.

1991 was a weird time to be in Russia. You are from the Ukraine? We were originally supposed to be in Kiev, it was decided by the government to move our exchange to Krasnodar because of the volatility in the Ukraine at the time. As I'm sure you know there are many in Krasnodar who know and have ties in the Ukraine. We watched the news very closely.

I regret to say that on my educational exchange in Russia, my group (from a prestigious prep school in the NE), kind of acted like jerks. It was only half of us, three in a group of six, but they behaved like really insensitive Americans, ended up offending our hosts often, and basically behaving like entitled children because 1991 Russia wasn't like 1991 New Hampshire. Half of us came to experience the country, people, and culture, and were often horrified at some of the things our fellows did. Particularly egregious as things weren't great in Krasnodar in 1991, and we were being treated to the best.

We ended up in a kind of open rebellion within our exchange group, with half keeping to themselves and people disliking them, and half of us making the most of the experience.

We went, for instance, to a collective farm for a weekend. I found some of the tasks kind of fun, and in the evening we retired to the hayloft, where they brought out balalikas, and a bit of vodka and farm made wine. I had brought several harmonicas in different keys, so we jammed a bit.

The sour-apple group kept to themselves. Wouldn't work, made friends with nobody, and consistently complained about the food, because it wasn't what they were used to. Honestly, some of the Cossaks there asked if they couldn't just dump them in the river?

Anyway, I think my Russian was the absolute worst of the group, I am somewhat dyslexic, and have a devil of the time with Cyrillic. Somehow, though, most of the 'grandmothers' seemed to always understand what I was saying in my tortured Russian, but never really got what the sour-apple group was intending, they'd ask for beef and get fish in gellitan, etc...

I was proud to visit the Soviet Union when it started to be Russia again. I feel very sad for my friends in the Ukraine and Russia for the problems between the two countries. Ferreting a recipe out of a Russian 'grandmother' is very difficult, first as they like my grandmother's generation don't use specific quantities, and second, at least in Krasnodar, really believe that a high school aged male is interested in cooking. "Lets write it down, grandmother, for my mother to cook for me, so I can remember my good Russian friends when I get back home. I want to remember this city and the country, and I have enjoyed your fine cooking."

My experience on an educational exchange was interesting, as half the people I went with had a completely opposite experience from the other half. Three people had the worst experience of their lives (or so they constantly said), and three of us enjoyed it very much, and have friends in Russia we still speak with, write to, and communicate with often.

My notebook, with my Krasnodar recipes, is in a storage box in limbo between moves. I keep a journal, and wrote most recipes in my journal at the time. We are about to move, and I'll track it down and post some.

Oh and I know things are tense between the Ukraine and Russia. I support my friends in Krasnodar, who on the whole have no truck with Putin's expansionist policies, neither now, nor similar polices in 1991 when I was there. I do imagine 1981 was very different in Krasnodar, love to hear your views. I do like the city a lot, both from my own time there, and from good friends who call it home. I was a bit sad that Krasnodar got tarred by some of the criticisms of Sochi during the winter olympics. It is a grand old town.

All right, we were talking perogies right? Sorry to hijack things.

Cheers,
TBS
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2016, 02:26 AM   #26
Sous Chef
 
CakePoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Wexio
Posts: 637
Tense is a understatement, the war in Ukraine with Russia is still ongoing. Also know as the Forgotten War.
__________________
For the love of Cheese!
CakePoet is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2016, 10:18 AM   #27
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,393
I don't want to get into politics of that war, but don't believe everything you read on the American propaganda news, if America did not stick its nose where it doesn't belong there would have been no war. They had at least 3 revolutions since 91-92 and all of them end up in peaceful removal of old the president, election of the new one and life went on.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2016, 10:28 AM   #28
Sous Chef
 
CakePoet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Wexio
Posts: 637
I am in Sweden, I dont read American news at all, why would i? And the conflict is not solved yet.
__________________
For the love of Cheese!
CakePoet is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2016, 05:19 AM   #29
Head Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,097
Back on topic. We made the pierogis from the Michael Symon beef cheek recipe that GG posted earlier in this thread.



EXCEPT, I used short ribs and the pressure cooker (simply because it is hot as hades here and didn't want to heat the house up with that long braise in the oven). Used the same amounts of everything and cooked under pressure for 40 minutes and let it cool down naturally. Never cooked beef cheeks so not sure how they shred, but the short ribs came apart in long shreds that were a bit difficult to wrangle when trying to fill and shape the pierogis. Next time, I would give them a quick pulse in the food processor or run a knife through them after shredding to cut down on the length of the shreds.

The dough was easy to work with but needs to be kept coolish because it tries to get sticky when it gets too warm. I divided the dough into 2 parts to roll out and ended up mushing the "ends" together, flattening to a disk, and sticking them in the freezer for a few minutes, before rolling them out. The dough didn't tear even when stretching a bit.

I did thin out the edges of the dough circles a bit by pinching them with fingers because I though the edge was too thick once I crimped the first one with the fork.

We've still got enough short-rib filling left over to make about 1/3 batch already in the freezer, so I may try and freeze the leftover cabbage to make cabbage filling, and maybe give a potato/cheese filling a whirl.

I also will NEVER attempt this recipe all in 1 day again.
__________________
medtran49 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2016, 07:39 AM   #30
Head Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 2,097
Oh, I used about 3/4 pound more of the short ribs than the recipe called for using the beef cheeks to account for the bone weight in the short ribs. These were big, meaty short ribs without much fat (not like the ones we usually see in a regular supermarket).
__________________

__________________
medtran49 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dough, pie, recipe

Pierogi Dough Recipe About that time of the year to harvest my potatoes. Curious if anyone makes pierogi, and has a recipe to share. I made some last year that were good, not great. Lost the recipe so Im looking for something new this year. Larry 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.