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Old 01-22-2006, 01:45 PM   #1
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Pot Stickers

Since I have had pot stickers in both a Korean restaurant, and a Chinese take-out place, I do not know who originated them. But I do know that I enjoy them! So much that I tried my hand at making them the other evening. I was very happy with the end result, and will definitely make them again.

It was a lot of work to roll the wontons & all. Does anyone else routinely make pot stickers?

Thanks,
Tom

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Old 01-22-2006, 02:30 PM   #2
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We usually just buy them frozen at Costco.

But would be glad to give them a try.

Would love it if you could post your recipe.
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:37 PM   #3
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Where do you find than at Costco??I didn.t know they carried them.
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Old 01-22-2006, 02:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by auntdot
... Would love it if you could post your recipe.
Well, like most new cooking adventures, I started with an Internet search, and stopped with this link. Those are Teri's notes pictured in the opening post.

Having a particular flavor in mind, I substituted Jimmy Dean Sage Sausage for the pork, and regular cabbage for the Napa (because the grocer was out of Napa). After failing to locate either rice wine or dry sherry (time for a new grocer ), the item was omitted.

I was struck by the "that's the flavor I like" sensation in the final product that was obviously a result of the cabbage.

While I am sure some purists may take exception to my use of "flavored pork", this is a dish worth repeating.

Tom
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Old 01-22-2006, 03:55 PM   #5
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I make potstickers by the gross and everyone loves them! The dough is a real bear to roll out because it is so stiff (just flour, salt and boiling water) so I put it together in the food-processor and use my pasta machine - between the two there is no hand-kneading time. They freeze wonderfully - freeze individually on sheets then I put them in Seal-a-meal bags. One afternoon of work yields many many dinners.

You can use wanton wrappers but they are more difficult to seal up than your own dough.

Here's my filling recipe:

1 1/4 lbs boneless lean pork, minced
2 T soy sauce
1 T honey
2 cloves garlic, minced fine
1/3 C minced green onion
1 T oil
2 T cornstarch
2 T dry sherry
salt and pepper.

Stir together pork, soy, honey, garlic, and onion. Heat oil in a wide fying pan over high heat. Add pork mixture and cook, stirring, untill well browned (6 to 8 minutes) Blend cornstarch and sherry then stir into pork. Cook, stirring, until mixture boils and thickens. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Cool

From: Sunset Pasta Cookbook

The filling recipe can be doubled or tripled.

Happy dipping!


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Old 01-22-2006, 04:49 PM   #6
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Oh, excellent! I have all the ingredients for Tom's except the napa cabbage, which is readily available in my area.

I will add green onions, as I've always had potstickers with them.

Cool!

Lee
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Old 01-22-2006, 07:20 PM   #7
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Is there a difference between these 3? If so, what? I think that Chinese Dumplings like you get in a Chinese restaurant have a much thicker dough & a little ball of meat or whatever in the middle. Pot stickers & Gyoza seem to have a thinner dough. That's all I can find in the stores. I prefer the thicker "skinned" Chinese dumplings.

Pot Stickers
Chinese Dumplings
Gyoza
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Old 01-22-2006, 07:29 PM   #8
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Corinne, try this link I think it might answer your question.
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Old 01-22-2006, 07:35 PM   #9
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Here's a gyosa recipe given me by Japanese friends:

GYOSA

1tsp. salt
1 cup finely chopped cabbage
1 slice minced ginger
2 minced scallions
3T soy sauce
1T cornstarch
1T sake
lb. ground beef & pound ground pork OR 1 lb. minced shrimp, crab, or fish or a mixture of these.

MIx all filling ingredients together, fill wrappers, seal edges with water. In skillet, heat oil to hot, place in gyosa; brown on one side; add a little water, and cover immediately; steam 5 minutes for seafood or 10 minutes for meat on low heat. Remove cover and cook til liquid is gone; shake pan so gyosa don't stick. Serve with Ponzu sauce.

The Chinese potstickers are traditinally made with a thicker dough than either gyoza (Japanese) or Korean (Mandu) dumplings.
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Old 01-22-2006, 08:00 PM   #10
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Dove, we used to find them regularly in the frozen food area.

The brand I believe is LingLing.

We follow the directions which is to boil and then, if you wish, saute them.

We like them fried.

Used to buy them in Florida when we lived there and now get them in Virginia. I assume they are available everywhere, but have not purchased them recently.

Why? Do not know, too many recipes in the world and we can just eat so much.

Wish there were more than the two of us to feed, we really like to cook.

We feel sorta humbled cause it seems that everyone else here makes their own.

But if Costco still sells it you might want to give it a try.

God bless.
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