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Old 02-22-2007, 04:32 AM   #1
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Smile Question about Thai ingredient.

Greetings,

I'm recently moved to Cairo, Egypt as an expat. Husband is working over here in the oil business. Anyway, I wanted to make a Thai soup called Tom Yam Kung and it calls for lemon grass, kaffir leaves (lime leaves), and golanga root. I can find the lemon grass, but I'm being told the kaffir leaves and golanga root are out of season. I've looked a lot of places. Can anyone tell me if there is a substitute for these?

Thank You In Advance,
Kathy

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Old 02-22-2007, 04:40 AM   #2
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for the leaves you can use the zest of a lime, you can use ginger in place of the galangal at a push.
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:26 AM   #3
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You can substitute them with dried ones. However if unavailable as well, then as YT suggested, use the zest of small lime or calamansi and slices of ginger. They are nowhere to be seen here!!
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Old 02-22-2007, 03:34 PM   #4
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I agree with the subs suggested but will add that I am pretty sure that Kaffir limes and galangal are grown year round. You can find both fresh in the US year round.
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Old 02-23-2007, 05:14 AM   #5
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Suggest you halve the quantity of ginger vs galangal. Galangal's taste is very delicate compared to ginger. Good luck!
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Old 02-24-2007, 02:00 AM   #6
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Ohhh..great thanks...that's very important. :-) Another question...I took a Thai cooking class (just a demonstration really...only 3 hours long) and until the class, I had never heard of Galangal root. Does it have the same flavor as ginger root or will it change the flavor of the soup?

My husband and I looooooooove Tom Yam Gung. We have found a wonderful Thai restaurant her in Cairo and went there for dinner last night. The owner actually gave me a few kaffir leaves and a chunk of galangal root. YEEEEEEY!! He took my number and when his supplier (I guess it's shipped from Thailand) sends more, he will sell me some as I need it. Thai food has not caught on here in Egypt enough for the markets to carry the ingredients. You really have to search. However, I'm told it IS catching on more and more, so that's wonderful. :-)

Thanks Again,
Kathy
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Old 02-24-2007, 02:56 AM   #7
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Galangal, a member of the ginger family has a more translucent skin and a pinkish tinge. Known locally in Singapore/Malaysia as 'blue ginger,' it has a wonderful sharp, lemony taste compared to ginger.
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Old 03-03-2007, 10:10 PM   #8
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I use lime skin -- pare it gently (you don't want any pith), and remove the skins before serving. For golanga I find that a touch of ginger helps, along with a touch of dark brown sugar. It isn't as good as the real thing, but what the heck. You are lucky to live somewhere you can get them AT ALL, much less in season. Good luck, and keep us up to date with what you're cooking and how it turned out
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Old 03-03-2007, 10:16 PM   #9
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Galangal is also known as Laos when it is dried ( ground) and I always keep a supply of it for my Sate Sauce. If you get home soon for a holiday or whatever, grab some ground Laos to take back with you. Also grab some dried Kaffir lime leaves. I know, hindsight is a wonderful thing but they will keep for ages and if you love Thai food....... :)
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