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Old 03-04-2011, 10:41 PM   #1
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Restaurant green chili.How do you make it?

I am a Mexican food fanatic and I am totally stumped.Growing up I remember big pieces of pork,chilies and tomatoes in green chili.Not anymore.Now everywhere you go all you get is an orange or pinkish color gravy devoid of any texture, but what it lacks in chunkiness it more than makes up for it in flavor. My regular green chili has always sucked for a lack of a better word.I have been trying for years to make the perfect smothered burrito.The re fried beans are another story.I have tried every recipe and technique and what they are all leaving out is their secret.
So I am hoping someone out here in D,C may know what I am looking for.
I am pretty sure the answer is in the way the pork fat is prepped and used.

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Old 03-04-2011, 11:02 PM   #2
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I think your talking about Chile Verde.
the toms are tomatillos and green to start out with.
Good stuff with many recipes to google.
I don't have a TNT one to share!
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:13 PM   #3
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just posting a ditto so that I get an email with any suggestions...
New Mexico makes the best verde, and it's instantly distinctive. I have no idea why, it's not the soil in Hatch, and I too suspect pork fat. I will definitely try any posted recipes.
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Old 03-05-2011, 12:16 AM   #4
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Green Chile/Chile Verde
olive oil
2 pounds pork shoulder blade steaks
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 large onion, chopped
4 tomatillos, diced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano
2 pounds roasted Anaheim or New Mexico chiles, peeled, seeded and chopped
4 serrano chile peppers, diced
3 roma (plum) tomatoes, seeded and chopped
salt to taste

Cut meat off bones and cube. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, add the bones and brown. Add two cups of water and bring to boil, cover and simmer 1 hour. Remove from heat, discard bones, skim scum off top and pour into a large measuring cup or bowl and set aside. Heat another tablespoon of oil in Dutch oven, add the cubed pork, garlic, onion, tomatillos, cumin and oregano. Cook and stir until pork is browned. Cook and stir for a few more minutes, then pour in the pork broth. Reduce the heat to low, and simmer, covered for about 45 minutes. You can roast your chilies during this time, peel, seed chop and add to the stew along with the serrano peppers. If the stew becomes too dry, add a little water. When the pork is tender, add the tomatoes. Cook for about 10 minutes, then remove from the heat and serve.
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Old 03-05-2011, 12:32 AM   #5
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Thank you, PFee!
Before I try... do you think the tomatillos are critical? I'm not a big fan of them.
I wish a market somewhere nearby roasted Anaheims daily. Sigh, I'm a bit oven-challenged, but this I suspect is a critical ingredient.
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Old 03-05-2011, 12:39 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spork View Post
Thank you, PFee!
Before I try... do you think the tomatillos are critical? I'm not a big fan of them.
I wish a market somewhere nearby roasted Anaheims daily. Sigh, I'm a bit oven-challenged, but this I suspect is a critical ingredient.
No the tomatillos are not critical...the pork and green chiles are. Check the freezer section in the store and see if there are frozen, roasted anaheims or if you can get Hatches green chiles, get a bunch of those, drain and chop. Enjoy, I love green chile and often shred the pork and turn it into a gravy for eggs, etc. I would be happy with green chile for every meal.
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Old 03-05-2011, 08:07 AM   #7
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I'm not a measurement fan with my green chili stew, but here goes.

Green Chili Stew

5-6 Pablano Chilis
2-3 Jalapeno or serrano chilis
6-8 Tomatillos depending on size, husks removed
Large onion, peeled, ends trimmed and quartered
5-6 lb Boston Butt
2-3 cloves garlic, unpeeled
Whole Cumin seeds
Chicken stock
Salt and Pepper

Options
carrots
potatoes
whole canned homeny

Preheat oven to broil (you can also do this on a grill). Place the chilis, tomatillos, onion and garlic in a single layer on an aluminun foil lined sheet pan. Broil, turning as needed to char all vegis. Remove chilis to a bowl and cover with foil or plastic wrap and set aside. Transfer tomatillos to a blender along with the onions. Peel the garlic and add it to the blender.
Toast the cumin seeds in a dry skillet until they start "hopping" in the pan, while stirring often. Remove to cool. After they cool slightly, grind in a spice grinder. Nothing quite smells as great as freshly toasted and ground cumin! Peel and seed the pablonos and add them to the blender. Peel and seed the jalapenos/serranos and add them to the blender. Chilis tend to very in heat. Sometimes the pablanos can be pretty spicy and/or the jalapenos/serranos can be mild. Taste is your best friend to determine the heat level. Try a taste of both the chilis before you add them to the blender. Adjust to your taste! Pulse blend to a smooth consistency, add cumin, salt and pepper to taste. You may have to add chicken stock to loosen up the sauce.

You now have a version of raw Chili Verde. I use this as is to braze the butt. If you want to use as a sauce, heat a large saute pan over medium high and add some Spanish olive oil to coat the pan bottom. CAUTION! You are going to add the sauce to hot oil, be prepared, it is going to spatter! Once the commotion is over, you will need to stir often. The sauce will slightly darken when it's ready. Let cool and use in recipes that call for chili verde. It will freeze well.

THE STEW
Heat a large heavy bottom pot or dutch oven to medium high heat. Trim the fat cap from the butt. Coat liberally with salt, pepper and cumin. Add canola oil to coat pan bottom. Brown on all sides and remove to a plate. Remove pot from heat and add raw chili verde. Place back over heat, add butt and any juices. Add chicken stock to bring liquid level about 3/4 way up the sides of the butt. Bring to a boil, cover reduce heat to low simmer and cook, rotating butt and adding stock as needed, until meat begins to "pull" off the bone. You can also do this in a 350 F oven. Remove from heat. Remove butt to cutting board and allow to cool enough to handle. Once cool pull the meat from the bone. Cut it into bite size pieces or shredd it, removing any fat. Reheat pot on medium high and skim fat. Add meat back to pot. You can eat it as is or add carrots, potatos or homeny in any combination you like, just mind the cooking times required i.e. carrots longest, potatos second and homeny last. Serve with warm tortillas!

Craig
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Old 03-05-2011, 08:11 AM   #8
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My recipe is similar Fiona's (excuse me for being so familiar, Your Highness) except I use chicken stock instead of water. I can't ever find tomatillos, and I use canned green chiles, all that is available here unless I grow my own.

You can use pork butt, cut into cubes, if that cut is available.

Sometimes I add a can of pinto beans or hominy. Probably sacrilege, but I like it. Add some warm flour tortillas--heaven.

Now I want chile verde.
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Old 03-05-2011, 08:20 AM   #9
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I sometimes roast my tomatillos (which, I disagree, Princess, tomatillos give salsa verde that bite that is missing if you use green tomatoes instead). Word of advice re: growing tomatillos: plant where you don't care if they take over. They are very invasive. My DH curses them every year because we always have more "volunteer" tomatillos than we want.

Here's one of the ways I make salsa verde:

~2 lb tomatillos (husked--do that under warm running water since they are sticky)
3-4 green tomatoes (I like to use Brandywines)
2-3 jalepeno peppers
1 serano pepper (I think those are the long skinny ones we grow <g>)
1-2 shallots (diced)
1/4 c fresh cilantro (or more)
1/3 c white vinegar (or less, depending on the amount of lime used)
3-6 cloves garlic
1/2 c olive oil
juice of 1/2 a lime (or more)
1 c fresh corn kernels (optional) (cooked)

Roast the tomatillos and peppers. Place the tomatillos, tomatoes, peppers, shallots, garlic, vinegar, and lime juice in a large saucepan over med-high heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes. Pour into the food processor, and puree until smooth. Add chopped cilantro and corn. I usually add a bit of cumin as well.

I make chicken enchiladas using this sauce.
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Old 03-05-2011, 11:50 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I sometimes roast my tomatillos (which, I disagree, Princess, tomatillos give salsa verde that bite that is missing if you use green tomatoes instead). Word of advice re: growing tomatillos: plant where you don't care if they take over. They are very invasive. My DH curses them every year because we always have more "volunteer" tomatillos than we want.

Here's one of the ways I make salsa verde:

~2 lb tomatillos (husked--do that under warm running water since they are sticky)
3-4 green tomatoes (I like to use Brandywines)
2-3 jalepeno peppers
1 serano pepper (I think those are the long skinny ones we grow <g>)
1-2 shallots (diced)
1/4 c fresh cilantro (or more)
1/3 c white vinegar (or less, depending on the amount of lime used)
3-6 cloves garlic
1/2 c olive oil
juice of 1/2 a lime (or more)
1 c fresh corn kernels (optional) (cooked)

Roast the tomatillos and peppers. Place the tomatillos, tomatoes, peppers, shallots, garlic, vinegar, and lime juice in a large saucepan over med-high heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes. Pour into the food processor, and puree until smooth. Add chopped cilantro and corn. I usually add a bit of cumin as well.

I make chicken enchiladas using this sauce.
Just responding to someone who doesn't care for tomatillos...I like them. I think if you are an adult, you should be able to not eat what you don't care for. And leaving one ingredient out of a recipe isn't that big a deal.

Your recipe sounds great!
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