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Old 10-06-2004, 10:21 PM   #21
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There is a large connection between the cuisines of France and Russia, dating, I believe, from the early part of the 19th century. There are some that believe the concept of the Bistro is actually Russian, many 'classic Russian dishes' have French origins or influence and vice versa. When any two countries go to war, their cuisines (and peoples) mix, sometimes making so it is difficult to establish which dish comes from where simply because it is a product of both. Some of the best baguettes I've tasted were baked by Vietnamese bakers. Hence, a dish a French person would call Russian, would of course be called French is Russia. And those of us trying to learn just call it good food and enjoy it!

Food history is fun, too!
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Old 10-06-2004, 11:41 PM   #22
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Stuffed Cabbage..and more stuffed cabbage with a crusty bread and butter. I am eatin that now.
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Old 10-07-2004, 06:12 PM   #23
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Two recommendations: Khachapuri (Georgian Home-style cheese bread) and Salmon & Champagne Ukha (originated in Russia as a simple fish soup, but is presented here as a luxurious dish, perfect for your special dinner).

For the filling in the bread, I’ve substituted fresh mozzarella for the Georgian suluguni cheese and have added a little feta (or, perhaps, Roquefort) for extra tanginess.

About 2 cups unbleached flour, plus more for dusting
3 tablespoons sunflower oil
1 Tbsp cornstarch
¾ tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
½ cup feta cheese (or 1 ounce of crumbled Roquefort)
4 ounces grated fresh mozzarella
1 egg, beaten
1 tsp melted butter

In bowl, blend 1/3 cup flour w/ oil. Add yogurt, mixing thoroughly, then stir in another 1/3 cup flour. Sift together cornstarch, baking soda, and salt; stir into flour micture. Gradually add enough flour to form soft, but not sticky, dough. Lightly dust it w/ flour, cover w/ tea towel, set aside in warm place to rest 1½ hours.

If using feta, soak it in water 10 minutes, then drain well & crumble. In bowl, using fork, mix feta (or Roquefort) & mozzarella w/ egg; shape into two even balls. Set aside.

Divide dough into two equal portions; roll into balls. Keep one ball covered while shaping other into a 7-inch round on floured work surface. Generously dust hands w/ flour. Gently rotate & pull dough into an even 10-inch disk, about ¼ inch thick.

Pat 1 ball of cheese mixture into 5-inch circle in center of dough. Gently pull edge of dough up over filling, pleating & pinching to seal. Pat into a 7-inch round.

Heat large, well-seasoned cast-iron or nonstick skillet over low heat for 3 minutes. Lightly film skillet w/ some melted butter and slide the bread, seam-side up, into skillet. Cover, cook over very low heat 12 minutes, shaking pan occasionally.

Uncover, flip the bread; cover and continue cooking, shaking skillet from time to time, until bread is deep golden brown, about 12 minutes. Lightly brush top w/ butter and slide dough onto wooden board. Let stand 5 minutes. Repeat w/ remaining dough. Serve warm.

For the Salmon-&-Champagne Ukha:

4 cups fish or chicken stock
2 egg whites
1 Tbsp finely chopped fresh tarragon
1 lb salmon steaks (4 pieces, each about 1-inch thick)
2 Tbsp chopped fresh dill
Salt & cayenne pepper to taste
2 cups champagne or other sparkling white wine
Thin lemon slices for garnish

In saucepan, heat stock to lukewarm. Remove from heat and transfer to large bowl. In same saucepan, whisk together egg whites & tarragon. Gradually add warm stock, whisking constantly. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer 25-30 minutes.

Strain through sieve lined w/ several layers of rinsed cheesecloth into large skillet. (Recipe can be prepared ahead to this point.)

About 20 min. before serving, bring stock to boil; add salmon, reduce heat and poach fish, covered, in barely simmering liquid for 15 min., or until fish flakes easily w/ fork. Carefully lift out salmon w/ slotted spoon, reserving broth; remove skin from sides and place fish in heated soup tureen. Sprinkle w/ dill, salt, cayenne, to taste; cover and keep warm.

In small saucepan, heat wine to just below boiling point, then add to reserved broth; pour over salmon. Garnish w/ lemon slices & serve immediately. Very elegant soup course.
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Old 10-08-2004, 12:31 PM   #24
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I just noticed that there's a show (Food 911) on Food Network tomorrow (Sat.) morning at 7:30 AM EST all on Russian cooking. The dishes Tyler's making are Roasted Beet Borscht, Beef Stroganoff over Buttered Noodles, and Apple-Cranberry Kissel with Sweet Sour Cream. Here's the link to the recipies: http://www.foodtv.com/food/show_fo/e..._34774,00.html

Good luck!
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Old 10-11-2004, 04:15 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic
Well Uncle Sasha, my neighbor next door to me, on the 14th floor of the Olympyskaya Derevyna taught me this recipe and when I asked her where she got it, she said it was an old Russian recipe she learned from her mother growing up in a village near Moscow, Alexandrov.
Of course, this recipe is indeed Russian. The funny thing is that russians think it's of French origin. :)

Seriously, I would not consider dishes having mayonnaise as an ingredient to be "native Russian".

This particular recipe is not that old as it claims; IMHO, it's from the modern Russian cuisine, as many other contemporary dishes. One of the reasons why I think so is the fact that it wasn't so easy to buy mayonnaise in Russia from 1950's until 1990's. You had to spend 3-4 hours in a queue to buy not more than one or two cans of mayonnaise. Moreover, mayonnaise wasn't always available in shops; I saw them selling mayo not more than twice a month. :( (Moscow and villages around it is an obvious exception, because they've never experienced any troubles with buying something.) In 1990's, when mayonnaise became available for the rest of Russia, people start using it widely. That "Village-style meat" (as your Moscow friend named it) or "Friench-style meat" (as this dish is named outside Moscow) became popular at about the same time.

I tend to agree that 20-30 years ago this dish could be named as "Village-style meat" in Moscow. But nowdays, most Russians know it as "French-style meet" (don't ask me why -- I do not know). You can easily check that if you ask a question in any of the russian cooking forums.

Alexander.
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Old 10-14-2004, 08:46 AM   #26
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(Moscow and villages around it is an obvious exception, because they've never experienced any troubles with buying something.) In 1990's, when mayonnaise became available for the rest of Russia, people start using it widely.
What??? I lived in Moscow in the 1990's and I stood in line for EVERYTHING!! Things weren't readily available there (unless you had the hard currency to shop at the Irish House or some other "Western" shop... which I didn't). I would stand in line for 2 hours to buy bedding, only to be the second in line when they ran out. I stood in line for milk for 3 hours once. Going to the grocery store (the one in our complex, not the outdoor weekly rynok)... as soon as my husband and I walked in, he would head for the check-out line while I shopped. If we were lucky, we only had to wait 15 minutes in line to get the receipt, and of course, we then we had to take that the cashier to pay, which also usually took 15 minutes or more. Lines and "defitcit" were just as much in Moscow in the 90's as any village, IMO. I remember MOBS for that nasty brown, barely more than tree bark, toilet paper that I FOUGHT for so I didn't have to use newspapers. If I didn't manage to get some... 3 months before it'd show up again. Mayo? No, I never saw it there. Svyeta's mother (the one who taught me the recipe), also taught me how to make mayo from scratch. She was literally THE most influential cook in my life and taught me scratch cooking. I was a "Kraft Mac and Cheese" and "Hamburger Helper" until then. I miss her, still and hope one day to go back and visit. I need to thank her again for making me a pretty good cook.

All that said... I miss Russia.
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Old 10-15-2004, 06:12 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic
What??? I lived in Moscow in the 1990's and I stood in line for EVERYTHING!! Things weren't readily available there (unless you had the hard currency to shop at the Irish House or some other "Western" shop... which I didn't).
You know what I'm talking about then.

Just beleive me: the troubles with buying things in Moscow (especially from 1989 until 1993 -- these were bad time for all Russia) is nothing against what happened at the same time outside Moscow. By the way, I'm pretty sure that more than a half of those crowds you've described was from cities and villages around Moscow (from Nizhny Novgorod, which is about 450 km away from Moscow, for example). There was a common joke here in Nizhny:
Q: What is long, green, and smelling like a sausage?
A: It's a train from Moscow.

The difference is not such big nowdays, though. Sometimes, there's no any difference at all. I must to say that I like it much better. :)
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Old 10-17-2004, 01:01 PM   #28
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I don’t know if you still want that girl to be your girlfriend, friend, but tell you one thing whoever suggested making borscht maybe was right, but the recipe was sure horrible. As the matter of fact all recipes on food network war pretty lousy.

If you were to make borscht like this for me I sure wouldn't want to be your girl friend after that.
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