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Old 09-06-2011, 11:13 PM   #21
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With due respect to American perceptions, sushi is predominantly about the rice.

In Japan, being a sushi apprentice means spending 8-10 years learning to prepare the rice properly. The topping, whether Chirashi, Nigiri, Maki, Inari, et al, is secondary to that. It's all about the rice.

That's the biggest reason why fast-food or grocery store sushi is so inferior to a high quality Japanese restaurant.
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Old 09-06-2011, 11:49 PM   #22
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Before we get off-track into cultural philosophies and such, lets instead remain on-course and discuss the "How To" of making your own sushi.

All parts of the traditions of sushi can be respected by those who wish and the freedom to explore the zillions of ways of making Modern Sushi can coincide with the old traditions by merely allowing both to exist without argument between them.

While accepting that sushi tradition defines "sushi" as "seasoned rice", in the more modern sense, sushi is now defined as many, many things, including both the manner of its creation and the items which are now used to create it.

It's a true 180 degree clash of the old and new. I once saw something that would make most traditional sushi people cringe; jello combined with a sushi-like appearance using dessert items to represent traditional sushi ingredients. The dish was a real hit with the kids it was for, whose parents were Modern Sushi lovers.

The details and traditional methods used to create what we know as "sushi" today are still respected when appropriate, and at the places that are appropriate. It would indeed be a rude person who would barge into a nice sushi establishment and try to order a hot-dog with relish and onions.

Equally, I don't believe that it would be fair to hold everyone to a traditional form of sushi in a forum that is open to a wide range of modern cooking and food preparation.

Let's try to keep on track with "Making your own sushi" and the thousands of ways to make that happen.

Thanks everyone!
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Old 09-07-2011, 03:08 AM   #23
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Let's try it!
Now, I've never prepared sushi before, I live in the biggest rice producing area of Europe, Pavia province, so I have no issue about rice.
It lloks like I need that oshibako box and a good knife. That's ok.
Now, what's the first recipe I could try?

Thanks
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Old 09-07-2011, 10:54 AM   #24
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Let's try it!
Now, I've never prepared sushi before, I live in the biggest rice producing area of Europe, Pavia province, so I have no issue about rice.
It lloks like I need that oshibako box and a good knife. That's ok.
Now, what's the first recipe I could try?

Thanks
Ok! Here is a way to make a type of sushi that is as easy as it gets!

It's called "Temari" sushi, or Temarizushi.

You simply make your seasoned sushi rice, place a piece of stretchy wrap on the counter, table or even on a plate. Then you put whatever you wish to be the "top" of the Temari Ball onto the plastic wrap and top it with a small amount of rice.

Then, gather the plastic wrap around the food and twist it into a ball!

When you unwrap the plastic wrap, you'll have a perfect little ball of rice that is topped with your choice of food!

The food can be anything that will form to the rice ball. Even diced veggies work for this! Perhaps a thick puree of colorful veggies!

You can even make it multiple layers by adding another layer of food in a complimentary color and taste, like avocado topped with smoked salmon.

The ideas are endless. That's one of the best parts of sushi. If you hate rice, then thick mashed potatoes or mashed sweet potato can be used instead. Even a bread cube could be used to do this!

If packing it into a bento or box-lunch, just leave the plastic wrap on the Temari ball and use items that keep well without refrigeration.

Here's a beautiful page showing some of the items that can be made into Temarizushi!

Enjoy!
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:13 AM   #25
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Hi Claire,

When I read your posts, I always think of my Grammy. Her name was also Claire, and she was the nicest person I've ever known in my entire life.

You sound as nice as she did!

When I looked up "A person who loves all things Japanese", I found:

Nippoanglophilus
Nippoanglophille
Anglonippophilus
Anglonippophile

A young Japanese women supplied those answers and said that each of them would work.

Do you recognise the one you're familiar with?

I always put a very light coat of vegetable oil on my sushi knives before storing it in a white cotton cloth. They seem to like it.
How funny, my best friend's mom was one of a very few women I knew named Claire, and her little brother was Timothy.

that said, I have a Vietnamese/American neighbor who we exchange stuff with and he brought me a package of nori of some sort. I really don't know what it is (the brand name is Dongwon, so assume it is Korean). But I think it is in little squares. The next time I see good tuna I'll let you all know what I do with the stuff.

Oh, I think I'll stick to saying, "a friend who likes all things Japanese!" Heck, I'm still confused as to why Franco-American was canned spaghetti, when, in fact, I and many of my friends over the years are Franco-American, and that has nothing to do with Italian food!
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:34 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Timothy View Post
...
You simply make your seasoned sushi rice,
...
SIMPLY???

Poor me, now I need japanese rice, rice vinegar, a rice cooker (don't know what it is), a sushi-oke, a shamoj...

Ok, I'm not giving up, but I think I'll try to prepare a sort of Pavese sushi using local food: the world famous Pavizushi!
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Old 09-07-2011, 12:35 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
SIMPLY???

Poor me, now I need japanese rice, rice vinegar, a rice cooker (don't know what it is), a sushi-oke, a shamoj...

Ok, I'm not giving up, but I think I'll try to prepare a sort of Pavese sushi using local food: the world famous Pavizushi!
Any short grain rice will work. Any wooden bowl will work. any method of gently turning the rice will work.

No special tools are necessary. Rice vinegar is in any Asian food store. You can cook the rice in any way you want to as long as it's not over-done to the point of mush.

Yes, very, very simple. Please don't give up.
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Old 09-07-2011, 12:42 PM   #28
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I use Cal-Rose rice, simply because it was the most commonly used rice for just about all Asian food when I lived in Hawaii (except for the Jasmine for Thai and Basmati for Indian), but most of the people I knew were of Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Filipino background, and they bought Cal-Rose by the 40 or 50 lb bags, which you could get anywhere. They all had huge rice cookers and filled them every morning before going to work. I use it for most applications ... When I first moved here I couldn't get rice to make risotto with and it worked just fine.
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Old 09-07-2011, 01:22 PM   #29
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I use Cal-Rose rice, simply because it was the most commonly used rice for just about all Asian food when I lived in Hawaii (except for the Jasmine for Thai and Basmati for Indian), but most of the people I knew were of Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Filipino background, and they bought Cal-Rose by the 40 or 50 lb bags, which you could get anywhere. They all had huge rice cookers and filled them every morning before going to work. I use it for most applications ... When I first moved here I couldn't get rice to make risotto with and it worked just fine.
Thanks Claire!

Years ago, when I made my very first sushi rice, I worried it to death before ever starting. "I'll mess it up....it'll be too sticky....it'll be not-sticky-enough....it'll be mush....it'll be too dry....it'll be too tart....it'll be too sweet", all of these thoughts went through my head.

It turned out perfectly and my very first homemade sushi was great!

Rice is very inexpensive. Try making your first sushi rice with only one-half cup of dry rice first. If it's no good, note what is wrong, throw it out and try again! After only a few tries, you'll have a perfect method down-pat and will never be intimidated by rice again!
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:50 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca Lazzari View Post
SIMPLY???

Poor me, now I need japanese rice, rice vinegar, a rice cooker (don't know what it is), a sushi-oke, a shamoj...

Ok, I'm not giving up, but I think I'll try to prepare a sort of Pavese sushi using local food: the world famous Pavizushi!
Lucca, I use a wide, shallow ceramic bowl to cool my rice with a wooden spoon/paddle. Works very well...even a lasagna pan would work to cool and season your rice. You don't need the fancy things to get good sushi.
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