"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > International Cuisines and Ethnic Cookery
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-12-2013, 03:06 PM   #1
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
The Maize Mystery lol!

Thought this might help clear up some confusion about the maize and corn products used in recipes on DC !

Corn has been getting a lot of publicity lately. But even before industrial agriculture dug its claws into this versatile cereal and invented high-fructose corn syrup, cultures around the world had devised myriad techniques for consuming every edible part of the plant. In Zimbabwe, you can buy roasted maize by the side of the road, or bags of popped maize, called maputi. Finely ground white maize (mealie-meal) is used to make the staple dish, sadza, as well as a thin porridge commonly eaten for breakfast. A Zimbabwean could easily eat corn three times a day.

Another corn permutation, common in southern Africa as well as the southern U.S. and Mexico – not to mention a food that kept the colonists alive in New England – is samp. Much has been written in an attempt to explain the difference between samp, hominy and grits, a task complicated by regional usages of these terms within the U.S. Here is how I distinguish between them:

- Hominy is dried, whole kernels of corn whose skins (or hulls) and germs (the little bit inside the kernel) have been removed.
- Samp is the same thing, except the kernels are cracked into a few pieces.
- Grits are ground hominy. Mealie-meal and polenta (typically made from yellow corn, instead of white) both differ from grits in that the hull and germ are not removed before grinding the dried kernels.

Got it?

Samp is typically paired with dried beans in southern Africa. In fact, you can often buy the soulmates packaged together in one bag. In South Africa, samp and beans (umngqusho) is a traditional dish of the Xhosa people, and was supposedly one of Nelson Mandela’s favorite meals growing up. You can serve cooked samp and beans with sautéed or fried onions, with butter, or with any sauce of your choosing.


SAMP

Pap (Maizemeal)


HOMINY




__________________

__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 03:10 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
GRITS



POLENTA





__________________

__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 03:14 PM   #3
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
WHITE POLENTA

__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 03:30 PM   #4
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snip 13 View Post
- Grits are ground hominy. Mealie-meal and polenta (typically made from yellow corn, instead of white) both differ from grits in that the hull and germ are not removed before grinding the dried kernels.
Not to confuse matters further but, depending on where you live in the US, grits can be made from yellow corn, as well as hominy. Yellow corn grits is essentially the same thing as polenta. Grits made from hominy can be called "hominy grits", "white grits", or simply "grits" in many places. There is also "blue grits" which is made from lye-treated blue corn.

I think this is probably a better explanation.
http://ask.yahoo.com/20021007.html

Some companies even go so far as to label the package like this:

__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 09:01 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,886
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I'm pretty sure it isn't hominy if it hasn't been treated with lye, called nixtamalization. That process makes more nutrients available.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 11:55 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Not to confuse matters further but, depending on where you live in the US, grits can be made from yellow corn, as well as hominy. Yellow corn grits is essentially the same thing as polenta. Grits made from hominy can be called "hominy grits", "white grits", or simply "grits" in many places. There is also "blue grits" which is made from lye-treated blue corn.

I think this is probably a better explanation.
What's the difference between polenta and grits?

Some companies even go so far as to label the package like this:


Thanks Steve :)
It's not confusing, just more info. Now I know you get yellow and white grits!

All the products are similar anyway and they all taste good to me!!!!

How do you prepare grits for shrimp and grits? I would really love to try it. We have coarse pap that looks just like the white grits. Would love to try it.
__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2013, 01:16 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,887
I'm needing some Shrimp and Grits myself Snip! I went searching for the recipe I posted some time ago. Here tiz...
Kayelle's Shrimp and Glorified Grits
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2013, 02:48 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,059
Thanks Snip. I love hearing more about food of other lands. Even if they are the same foods we eat here. Just by a different name. And you are right. Corn has been getting a bad name of late. I try my dangest to cook from scratch. The less chemicals I put into my body, the better I feel. And with the corn syrup, it is the chemicals that are used that make it unacceptable as an additive to Americans and the foods that it is used in to provide a cheap way of added sweetener.

Corn is on my no no list. Aside from the hight carb content in its natural state, I can't digest the skins on the kernals. And I so dealy love corn chowder. One of my favorite foods. I am a label reader. Have to be. The food industry loves to sneak that pesky corn syrup into their products. As a diabetic, I have to watch for that. I also love white grits with cheese and an egg on top. Don't eat that too often either along with corn muffins. In fact 'corn' anything. Have to stop and think before I do.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2013, 02:56 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
Any huitlacoche (corn fungus) likers here? I've never been able to find any.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2013, 02:58 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Clear up any confusion?
This is why I stick with plain old corn
__________________

__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.