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Old 07-23-2012, 01:14 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
It's not schnitzel in Japan. Just as Roulaide is French, while Rouladen is Doiche for the same preparation.

I have made this dish and before and just called it panko breaded pork loin.

Their are some foods that are so good, that they are made in many places in the world, and just called something different in each language. For instance, Sashlik in Russia is Lamb shish-Kabob in Michigan.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I looked at some recipes online and there is a variety. All versions show the meat fried then served sliced. In some cases the fried meat is a thin cutlet sliced, sometimes it's a pork chop fried then sliced and in some cases it's a thick chop or small loin roast fried and sliced.

Finally, in one recipe the photo and the recipe are different.
well,ye lives & learns...excellent,thanks chaps
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Old 07-23-2012, 01:24 PM   #12
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That is pretty much it from what I can see too Harry, the Japanese bit is using Panko crumbs?

That sauce reminds me of HP Fruity Sauce, dont even know if you can still get it.....
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Old 07-23-2012, 01:28 PM   #13
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Buonasera,

Thanks for posting your Japanese Breaded Lion of Pork recipe. I shall give it a whirl in August.

Ciao,
Margi.
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Old 07-23-2012, 01:30 PM   #14
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I've made this recipe for years, after originally enjoying it in Japanese restaurants. It is essentially a pork cutlet, pounded to about 1/2" thick, floured to stick the egg, dipped in egg then breaded in Panko crumbs (name brand, or generic, or DIY) and pan fried in oil. Tonkatsu is then cut into strips for serving. I've used Kikkoman Tonkatsu sauce with good results.
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:01 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
That is pretty much it from what I can see too Harry, the Japanese bit is using Panko crumbs?

That sauce reminds me of HP Fruity Sauce, dont even know if you can still get it.....
nope hun,i thought that but,as andy pointed out,take a look at the link in post #2....looks good to me your magnanamousness!!
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:18 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
OK. This statement 'Pork Loin about 1/4 pound and cut about 1/2 inch thick' is confusing. Also, a quarter pound of pork loin may be about two inches thick or so. Is tonkatsu that small?
I just had a look at a 497 gram piece of frozen pork loin. It's about 2-2.75 inches thick (I didn't cut it quite straight). So I think we're in the ball park with 1/2 inch thick for a quarter of a pound.
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Old 07-23-2012, 02:27 PM   #17
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Whenever I've seen Tonkatsu recipes, and the version I cook, you start out with pork loin pieces about 1" thick and pound them out to be about 1/2" thick. If you cut them 1/2" thick I suspect it would result in a different texture.

The cutlets start out being about the size of a person's palm, and after pounding about the size of a full hand. I'm guessing the cutlets are about 1/4 pound, i.e. 4 ounces.
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Old 07-23-2012, 03:13 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
I've made this recipe for years, after originally enjoying it in Japanese restaurants. It is essentially a pork cutlet, pounded to about 1/2" thick, floured to stick the egg, dipped in egg then breaded in Panko crumbs (name brand, or generic, or DIY) and pan fried in oil. Tonkatsu is then cut into strips for serving. I've used Kikkoman Tonkatsu sauce with good results.
That is basically what I do but after I put the breading on I pop them in the freezer for a bit to set the coating. But I make my own sauce.


Tonkatsu by powerplantop, on Flickr
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Old 07-23-2012, 03:20 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
That is basically what I do but after I put the breading on I pop them in the freezer for a bit to set the coating. But I make my own sauce.


Tonkatsu by powerplantop, on Flickr
That looks terrific!

So, how thick was that piece of meat before and after pounding?

Would you give us the recipe for your sauce please?
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:24 PM   #20
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That looks terrific!

So, how thick was that piece of meat before and after pounding?

Would you give us the recipe for your sauce please?
They were just over 1/2" thick and I pounded them to just under 1/2".

Breading: Dip in flour, egg, back into flour, egg then Panko. The double flour and egg gives a nice thick breading but it is messy so place it in the fridge or freezer to set the breading.
Fry at a low temp (235-245 F) until dark brown on both sides.

Sauce:
cup ketchup
2 tablespoons soy sauce.
cup Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon apple sauce
tablespoon spicy mustard
1 teaspoon minced garlic
Pinch of black pepper
1 or 2 tablespoons Ginger juice
Juice of half a lemon
2 tablespoons of brown sugar
Boil for 2 minuets
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egg, pork, pork loin, recipe, salt pepper

Tonkatsu: Japanese Pork Loin!! This is a quick an easy recipe to make at home for yourself or company. I first came across this recipe when in Gifu,Japan in a small Tonkatsu Restaurant. Please read the recipe first before making your dish. If you do not know how to make panko go to my previous post here [URL]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f21/how-to-make-japanese-panko-79704.html[/URL] You will need the following Pork Loin about 1/4 pound and cut about 1/2 inch thick 1 egg Flour Salt Pepper Panko Bread Crumbs Cooking oil 1. Take your pork loin and put little cuts in the fatty parts to make it tender. Tenderize the pork loin like any other piece of meat with meat tenderizer or rolling pin. 2. Add a sprinkle of salt and pepper to each side 3. Put a lite coat of flour on each side of the pork loin. 4. Take about 1/2 egg into a bowl add about 1 table spoon of water, mix well, then dip both sides of the pork loin in it. 5. Dip the both sides of the pork loin in the panko flakes. 6. Place pork loin in cooking oil and fry until golden brown. Notes: Make sure your oil is about 350F before putting your pork loin in. This meal is typically served over rice,caramelized onions and topped with an egg. I hope you enjoy this quick and tasty Japanese meal. I will publish later "How to make your own Panko Crumbs and dipping sauce" in another page. Mike :chef: 3 stars 1 reviews
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