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Old 02-18-2011, 10:46 AM   #31
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Please do get a recipe for the homemade ketchup! An ex-boyfriend's mom used to make tourtiere with the best homemade ketchup. She grew up in the Gaspe area.
Oh, I meant I would ask what was traditional to serve with tourtière. I forgot to ask. Thanks for the reminder.

I could post the recipe I use. My Québecois friends really liked it, as do I.
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:52 AM   #32
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Oh, I meant I would ask what was traditional to serve with tourtière. I forgot to ask. Thanks for the reminder.

I could post the recipe I use. My Québecois friends really liked it, as do I.
She always had the ketchup on the side. I don't recall but vaguely think she also served gherkins...I remember a topnote of clove in her ketchup.

While you're asking--a C-pie recipe?

And, I'd be interested in your catsup recipe.
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Old 02-18-2011, 11:00 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Oh, I meant I would ask what was traditional to serve with tourtière. I forgot to ask. Thanks for the reminder.

I could post the recipe I use. My Québecois friends really liked it, as do I.


Please do. The more recipes for meat the better, IMHO.
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Old 02-18-2011, 11:56 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
She always had the ketchup on the side. I don't recall but vaguely think she also served gherkins...I remember a topnote of clove in her ketchup.

While you're asking--a C-pie recipe?

And, I'd be interested in your catsup recipe.
I posted the recipe: Tasty Tomato Catsup
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Old 02-18-2011, 03:31 PM   #35
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We always have green chow chow, which is a green tomato relish. Sweet and tangy with thinly sliced onions in there. My mother still makes it.
This is basically the recipe but my mother never put ginger in it. http://www.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=h...:9&tx=84&ty=69
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Old 02-18-2011, 03:56 PM   #36
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Chow Chow is a must in the southern states during canning season. My friends in North Carolina and Tennessee can alot of it. It's a great condiment. I make a relish from green tomatoes when I have too many in the garden. Tastes similar.
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Old 02-18-2011, 04:00 PM   #37
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Chow Chow is a must in the southern states during canning season. My friends in North Carolina and Tennessee can alot of it. It's a great condiment. I make a relish from green tomatoes when I have too many in the garden. Tastes similar.
Popular with the French Canadians too! I wonder if the Acadians brought it down there....
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Old 02-18-2011, 04:10 PM   #38
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The Acadians may have brought the chow chow down south. Very possible.
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Old 02-18-2011, 04:21 PM   #39
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We always have green chow chow, which is a green tomato relish. Sweet and tangy with thinly sliced onions in there. My mother still makes it.
This is basically the recipe but my mother never put ginger in it. Google Image Result for http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_E5OZqFOd2Qg/SrqHHanhcRI/AAAAAAAADcs/vKFsWmZJZSo/s400/IMG_0015.jpg
My DH calls this green tomato relish and MUST have it on mac and cheese. I'm not partial to it, but he MUST make some each year specifically for mac and cheese...
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Old 02-19-2011, 05:46 AM   #40
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It is killing me that I cannot remember what my mom's family called green tomato relish, but it wasn't chow chow, that's what they called it in the south U.S. Oh! There, the little green cells kicked in. Picalilliy (heaven knows how it is spelled). Mom says my pepere Daneault made it. I don't remember eating it with tourtiere; I'll have to ask her. I DO remember making it one year before Gram died and I thought we'd die crying because the onions were particularly strong.

Beets were (and in my house, are) always eaten with the tourtiere. I think probably simply because it is a vegetable that would last through the winter, and that's when we traditionally ate tourtiere. My Quebecoise cookbook has about a dozen recipes for tourtiere.

I, too, would like to see a recipe for home-made catsup. Ketchup. Whatever!
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french canadian, meat pie, recipe, tourtiere

Tourtiere [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]This is a recipe from a friend of mine, its a keeper. 1 pound of ground pork per pie (or 1/2 lb pork and 1/2 lb of ground beef) 1/4 of an onion 1 tsp of sage 1/2 tsp of poultry seasoning salt and pepper to taste (dash of celery salt if you like) Mix and cook till meat turns brown, If excess juice, then pour it out but you do want some juice otherwise the pie will be dry/tough. Put browned meat mixture into the pie shell, put top crust on and bake till golden brown. If the sage is really strong, then cut back on the amount, otherwise taste test to be sure. Edit: I also use a LOT more onion. I do the whole onion myself, but I thought I'd put in the recipe as it was given to me, not my edited version![/FONT] 3 stars 1 reviews
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