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Old 10-19-2004, 08:44 AM   #11
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This recipe for Tourtiere was given to me by a very accomplished Québecois chef:

Pastry
2 cups flour
1 & 1/3 tsp baking powder
2/3 cup salt
5 & 1/3 oz. lard
1/3 cup boiling water
1 & 1/3 tsp lemon juice
1 large egg, beaten

Combine first 3 ingredients. Add about 2/3 of the lard; cut in until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add remaining lard to boiling water and stir until melted. Stir in juice & egg and add to flour mixture, tossing with a table fork until it makes a ball; dough will be soft. Knead briefly on a floured surface and shape into a block. Wrap in waxed paper and chill for at least 4 hours.

Filling
1 potato, peeled
1 lb ground lean pork
1 onion, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
½ tsp EACH salt, dried thyme, summer savory
¼ tsp dry mustard
1/8 tsp allspice

Cook potato in boiling water until tender; drain, reserving 4 fl. oz. potato water; mash & set aside.

Combine pork, reserved potato water, onion, garlic, and seasonings in large saucepan and bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer mixture, stirring from time to time, until most of the liquid is reduced (about 25-30 minutes). Remove from heat and stir in mashed potato. Chill.

Line a 9-inch pie plate with half of the pastry. Fill with the chilled meat mixture, cover with top pastry and seal. Cut steam vents and decorate with pastry scraps cut out in the shape of holly leaves.

Bake at 450° for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 350° and bake 20 minutes longer – until crust is golden.
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Old 10-21-2004, 02:46 AM   #12
 
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Thanks Konditor!

I'm marking that one down, especially with the pastry instruction!
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Old 10-24-2004, 10:34 AM   #13
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My maiden name is Roy, actually, a name you don't see all that much in LA but a lot in Quebec. My grandmothers couldn't cook worth a poop (boiled dinners was it) which is why I've tried to single-handedly bring back tourtiere. It is the ONLY old traidition, food-wise. My childhood friends were all daughters of French war brides, and only one ever heard of meat pie as a holiday, late night meal tradition, so I can probably trace it there. She and I have had tourtiere competitions when we spend holidays together (very, very rarely). I'll be honest, my interest was first spiked when my Avon lady in Hawaii sold me a cookbook (I'm NOT a sucker for make-up, but am a major sucker for cookbooks) with a recipe from every country Avon sells in. In Canada it was tourtiere. I was in my late 20s and just laughed. Husband saw it and wanted to try it. At that time no one in my family had made it for easily well over a decade. Before then, I honestly didn't have a clue how to even spell it. To my childhood ears, I'd have sworn they were saying "toot care". And I grew up hearing French every day in my early years. I think we need a line about food history and traditions.
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Old 11-17-2004, 02:20 PM   #14
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Tourtiere

Bon jour:

I was born up in northern Ontario a mere 30 miles from the Quebec border. Pere Beaudry was the baker in our family. I have such fond memories of the food he used to make. He learned from his Grandmere. He loved to hunt and fish and there was never a shortage of wild game in the house. So it wasn't unusual to have wild meat in our tourtiere.

Unfortunately I don't have his recipe for meat pie. I remember the pie so well and I think I'm going to ask him for the recipe. I think I remember him adding onions and just various types of ground meat. He made a gravy right in the meat and put that all in the pie crust which was made with shortening. Then he put the top crust on and put it in the oven. I loved it with mashed potatoes, cranberries and stuffing from the turkey...Mon Dieu, such fond memories..

DG.
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Old 11-17-2004, 02:33 PM   #15
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Oh, what memories!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 11-17-2004, 03:30 PM   #16
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Papa Beaudry's Tourtiere

I just spoke to Pere Beaudry and this is the recipe he gave me....I am going to be brave and make this with ground turkey since I don't eat red meat. I think bison can also be used in place of the beef. I will also substitute 1/2 butter and 1/2 margerine for the shortening since I don't use it. My flour choice will be spelt. My hubby doesn't do gluten flours too well, and spelt is more easily digested. The pie crust will also be made from spelt flour.

Papa Beaudry's Tourtiere

1/2 tbsp. oil (or less if you prefer)
1 pound ground lean beef (veal or moose meat can also be used)
1 1/2 pounds ground lean pork
1 clove garlic chopped fine
1 onion chopped in medium pieces
1/4-1/2 tsp. thyme or oregano, or both
salt to taste
flour mixed in a little cold water for thickening
milk or cream to brush the top of the crust
2-9 inch shortening pie crusts

Cook the onion, garlic and spices on medium low heat in the oil until onion is transparent, add the meat. Let simmer stirring occasionally until meat is no longer pink. Make a gravy by adding the flour rue and thicken the meat mixture. Put into crust making small slits on top of the crust for steam vents. Brush the top of the pie with some milk or diluted cream for a nice shiny crust. Pere Beaudry says the meat can be dry in the pie, so the gravy keeps it moist.

Bake at 450° for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 350° and bake 20 minutes longer – until crust is golden.

Bon Apetit
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Old 11-17-2004, 03:33 PM   #17
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C'est formidable, DG. Now I have three recipes for this dish of my ancestors. Merci mille fois a Pere Beaudry !
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Old 11-17-2004, 04:01 PM   #18
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Tourtiere

mudbug...

You're very welcome.... j'espérez que vous appréciez le pâté en croûte.
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Old 11-17-2004, 04:03 PM   #19
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Bien sur. J'aime bien touts les viandes en croute!
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Old 11-17-2004, 04:08 PM   #20
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Thank you so very much for the recipe!!! .....something about liking meat pie????? Not that I know the first thing about French - my translator site couldn't even translate into all English - left some of them French! LOL
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