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Old 12-26-2010, 02:50 AM   #31
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Hors d'œuvres are pronounced Horse Doovers...
I call 'em "horse dovers"
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Old 12-26-2010, 05:51 AM   #32
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I call 'em "horse dovers"
ervee dervee's.
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Old 12-26-2010, 10:13 AM   #33
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Actually, not being from the state I now call home, I have been known to call it eel-ee-nwa. I don't do it often (like I said, I try, for the most part to blend in, party of my military brat upbringing). Actually, sometimes many generations locals and I get in conversations, and I tell them that the tribe of Native Americans around here were called the Illini (I may have that misspelled) and the early French settlers called this Illinois. In other words, place of the Illini. Like Tourquoise, the color, means Turkish in French, and Chinoise (think antiques and the Eastern correspondent, Chinoy, I think his name is), simply mean "Chinese" in French.

But, hey, I've got a thing for word origins. Sort of a hobby for me. But like I said, for the most part I pronounce words the way the locals do. It's pop here, soda there, and my grandparents called it tonic. It's a water fountain there, a bubbler there.

The one thing I'll never get used to is Ant for Aunt. Luckily, now that I'm a grand-aunt, I've graduated to being Ma Tante! So no longer to I have to cringe when someone calls me "Anne-tee"!
I too have always been interested in word origins. I came across the book "Word Power Made Easy" by Norman Vincent Peale back in the '60s. There were lessons telling about how osteo means bone, etc., and at the end of the lesson there was a quiz. That one book gave me so much knowledge. I can look at most new words and break down the components and figure out the meaning.
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Old 12-26-2010, 11:30 AM   #34
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So many cities in the country have bastardized pronunciations of the original When we were on the road I'd crack people up calling places like Papillion like the French word for butterfly (heck, there's a butterfly painting on the water tower) and Cairo as if it was a city in Egypt rather than a bottle of corn syrup.
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Old 12-26-2010, 01:23 PM   #35
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So many cities in the country have bastardized pronunciations of the original When we were on the road I'd crack people up calling places like Papillion like the French word for butterfly (heck, there's a butterfly painting on the water tower) and Cairo as if it was a city in Egypt rather than a bottle of corn syrup.
True! I finished growing up, after Dad's stint in the Air Force, in Laramie, WY. It's a French word, La-ray-mi...we say Lara-mi. Seems to me the French words and names have suffered the most.
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:18 PM   #36
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I keep in all the "juices" (I use ground meat that is lean, so the juices aren't just fat), then use instant mashed potatoes as the binder. It's a shortcut, but tastes good and keeps the slices looking like slices.
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:21 PM   #37
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By the way, tourtiere party is the 2nd. We were arranging it last night over Christmas dinner at a friend's. I mentioned that dinner (or lunch) when they visited would be tourtiere. OMG, my friend said. "Daddy, you haven't had this. It is really authentic old cooking that actually tastes good!"
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:24 PM   #38
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By the way, tourtiere party is the 2nd. We were arranging it last night over Christmas dinner at a friend's. I mentioned that dinner (or lunch) when they visited would be tourtiere. OMG, my friend said. "Daddy, you haven't had this. It is really authentic old cooking that actually tastes good!"
That's funny! Most old-fashioned tastes good!
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:25 PM   #39
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Princess, I think you're right, the French names have suffered the most, but no language is exempt. I never thought of Laramie as being a French word (I grew up between Europe and living out west), but now that you mention it. I also try to figure out what place names mean. Des Moines, IA. Huh? The nearest I can make out it means "of the monks"? Actually, I think I'll start a line elsewhere and see if anyone is interested.
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:29 PM   #40
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Oh, I don't know. My grandmother's and eldest aunts' tourtiere was nowhere near as good as mine. I swear, they just took very fatty ground pork, raw, patted it into a pie crust, and baked it. It took easily 30 years and a decade of my friend and I having a sort of competition, to come up with a recipe. My sisters wouldn't touch the stuff with a ten-foot pole until I refined it, and now they make it for the family. But both my parents will readily say that their mothers were truly lousy cooks.

I've been to a couple of "authentic" banquets from the 17th and 18th centuries, and trust me, you don't want to go there!
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