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Old 04-01-2016, 09:46 AM   #11
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Yes I like to marinate chicken in this velveting manner (e.g. overnight) although I have not incorporated it as part of a stir fry. Instead of wine, I use soy sauce and crushed garlic i.e. to the egg white and cornflour. They really add to the flavour. This method helps to tenderise the meat (as you would expect from a marinade) and obviously seal in the flavour. It works well with mushrooms too! Chicken strips cook out in about 5-10 mins each side (pending on intensity of heat). I just regard them as battered chicken.

Maybe halving the cooking time would suffice for a stir fry, i.e. finishing off the cooking with the veg etc.

I think I will try it with potato flour next time (to replace the cornstarch which is liable to be GM).
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Old 04-01-2016, 11:53 AM   #12
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Just to be clear, velveting is not just marinating. It's marinating meat specifically with egg white in the marinade and then blanching it in either hot oil or boiling water.
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Old 04-01-2016, 01:05 PM   #13
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Just to be clear, velveting is not just marinating. It's marinating meat specifically with egg white in the marinade and then blanching it in either hot oil or boiling water.
True, the required vehicle for velveting is egg white and cornstarch passed through with water or oil.

CG, I only used 2 well beaten egg whites for a lb of meat.

GG, that conversation from Kenji was really interesting.
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Old 04-01-2016, 01:15 PM   #14
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Yes, the chinese recipe I gave (above) is a velveting marinade that replaces the wine with soy and adds crushed garlic to the egg white and cornflour.

In a bowl mix together one egg white, 1 tbsp. cornflour, 1 tbsp. soy/tamari and 2 crushed garlic cloves.
Then add 200g chicken breast, cut into strips/chunks.

This velveting process can be marinaded/left for a few hours or overnight (turning occasionally).

When required, then fried on high heat for approx 5 mins each side.
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Old 04-01-2016, 01:41 PM   #15
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[COLOR=Purple]Yes, the chinese recipe I gave (above) is a velveting marinade that replaces the wine with soy and adds crushed garlic to the egg white and cornflour.
I was trying to clarify that the velveting method includes par-cooking, whether in oil or water. It's not just marinating and then cooking.
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Old 04-01-2016, 02:08 PM   #16
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I was trying to clarify that the velveting method includes par-cooking, whether in oil or water. It's not just marinating and then cooking.
The velveting is the process of marinading the meat in the egg white and cornflour mixture. It is this method that tenderises the meat hence the reference to velvet. The chinese recipe I had for it then cooks it but I see that this is a variation on the standard method of par cooking it.
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Old 04-01-2016, 02:43 PM   #17
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The velveting is the process of marinading the meat in the egg white and cornflour mixture. It is this method that tenderises the meat hence the reference to velvet. The chinese recipe I had for it then cooks it but I see that this is a variation on the standard method of par cooking it.
Sorry, but no. Velveting is a three-part process. If it was that easy, us "lazy cooks" would be doing it all the time

Velveting is
1. Marinating with egg white and cornstarch.
2. Par-cooking in water or oil - the meat and coating are fused but the meat is still raw inside.
3. Stir-frying to finish cooking and to incorporate other ingredients and a sauce.
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Old 04-01-2016, 04:07 PM   #18
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I found a great explanation of the process, along with pictures! I'm a visual learner - pictures are good.

~ How to: Velvet (Tenderize) Meat the Chinese Way~

I think I also found another rabbit hole to fall into...
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Old 04-01-2016, 04:23 PM   #19
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I found a great explanation of the process, along with pictures! I'm a visual learner - pictures are good.

~ How to: Velvet (Tenderize) Meat the Chinese Way~

I think I also found another rabbit hole to fall into...
+1

And here's more from Kenji on the science of velveting and another delicious-sounding recipe using the technique: The Food Lab: Stir-Fried Velvet Chicken with Snap Peas and Lemon-Ginger Sauce | Serious Eats

Another note: It doesn't take several hours or overnight to marinate strips or pieces of chicken, pork or beef. Up to three hours is plenty.

(I will not follow you down that rabbit hole... I will not follow you down ... uh ...)
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Old 04-01-2016, 05:08 PM   #20
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GotGarlic - the chinese recipe did say to marinade it for a few hours or overnight. (Turning it several times for the first hour - to help ensure the cornflour disperses evenly).

I suggest that you don't knock it until you've tried the recipe ....
you never know, you might like it!


It's really good!
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