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Old 02-23-2008, 10:58 AM   #11
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I love a good chicken vindaloo, plenty wine and garlic and Loads of chilis :)

you`ll know when it`s done correctly, it`ll stain the plate, make you sweat, and I`m saying Nothing about next day!

I`v never tried Pataks, I`v been fortunate to have a place that makes it for me exactly to my liking, I`m the only one in the house that can eat it however, so I get to have it very often :(
although my 2.75 year old daughter is up Madras curry heat and loves it.

Tindaloo if nice also, but you need to be pretty Lagered up to eat it, and Phal....
I manage about a tablespoon and then I`m begging for mercy (but still wanting more coz the smell is nice).
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Old 02-28-2008, 03:45 PM   #12
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Vindaloo, my first attempt, now follow up

See my post below, or this.

I used a few small red potatos diced.
1 ripe fresh tomato diced.
1/2 lb. shrimp, peeled.
1/4 cp. water.
2 tbs. Patak Vindaloo paste from jar.

This was not at all what I expected. I'm Texan, German American and really like pretty much all food.. but this was so strange..I ate half my plate, my roomate actually ran out the front door from the smell....

I am not new to Cumin, Cardamon or chillies, so it was not that...

Is it the Tumeric or Fenugreek that gives curry that smell and flavor?

I feel sort of odd that I just really didn't like this at all.

I guess I was expecting a sort of a Mexican version of Shrimp Creole.

I need to get to an Indian buffett and see what I'm getting into here!

It was good fun though!
Thanks, Eric Austin Tx.

I am trying Vindaloo for the first time. I don't know anything about Indian food, but I am adventurous. Not having all the spices I see in the recipies, I thought I'd look for a pre-packaged "kit" to get started.

I found Patak's ready made Curry paste at my local Indian food grocery. What an interesting place just up the street from me! They make all kinds of "kits" and jars of paste..

The lable says.. Fry up one onion, then add 1/2 pound shrimp, then 1 cp. crushed can tomatoes plus a 1/4 cp. water, cook till shrimp are done, 5 min. then stir in 3-4 tbs. of Vindaloo paste from jar, serve over rice...

Does this sound OK?

I'll probably like it... but my SO is not very adventurous.. and I'm hoping it will be good enough so I can try harder next time!

Thanks, Eric, Austin, TX.
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Old 02-28-2008, 05:02 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giggler View Post
This was not at all what I expected. I'm Texan, German American and really like pretty much all food.. but this was so strange..I ate half my plate, my roomate actually ran out the front door from the smell....

I am not new to Cumin, Cardamon or chillies, so it was not that...

Is it the Tumeric or Fenugreek that gives curry that smell and flavor?

I feel sort of odd that I just really didn't like this at all.

I guess I was expecting a sort of a Mexican version of Shrimp Creole.

I need to get to an Indian buffett and see what I'm getting into here!
I think this is an excellent idea Then you can try a variety of items and see what flavors you like. Make sure you write down the items you try and then Google them for the recipes, to see what's in them, or get an Indian food cookbook.

When you're trying flavors that are completely different from what you've grown up with, I think many people have the reaction you did. When DH was in college, he had an Indian roommate who often cooked up dishes that were completely foreign to us - the smells and the flavors. It took some time, but now we enjoy all kinds of cuisines. There just wasn't much in the way of good Indian, Thai or Japanese food around where we grew up.

So keep trying - just because you didn't like the one dish doesn't mean you won't like them all. Tandoori chicken is one I enjoy; chicken biryani is another.

btw, I'd be interested in Yakuta and wazaa's opinions of those recipes
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Old 02-28-2008, 05:35 PM   #14
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Giggler, I am not sure what you mean by smell and flavor. Not all curries are pungent and hence I indicated that vindaloo is an interesting choice for someone not that familiar with Indian food.

The flavor and smell of a multitude of spices gives curry it's pungent flavor and smell. Fenugreek adds bitterness, Corrainder seeds are a bit nutty but with a spicy pungenency and cumin is nutty. In addition to that chilis add the heat and warm spices such as cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, black pepper add warmth with sweetness, turmeric adds color and does not have much in terms of taste. All that combined together and then along with a base - which can be yogurt, cream, tomato, ground nuts (almonds, cashews etc.), vinegar, just onions etc. make a curry. If you use dairy with you curry the taste and flavor will be mellow, if you use tomatoes it will be bright and full bodied and if you use just onions and vinegar it will be super pungent.

As I had indicated try to refer to North Indian recipes and give them a try and see what you think. They are milder and less pungent and maybe what your taste buds are used to.

GotGarlic - The recipes you posted are good but again if I were to nitpick they are not authentic. That does not mean it will not yield a good outcome but here are some changes I would recommend:

Tandoori Chicken - Not sure what ground ginger means (hopefully not ginger powder). Please ensure you use freshly grated ginger. Garlic is not authentic so skip it (ginger is sufficient). Ground spices (cumin and corrainder should be increased to 2 tsps each and should be freshly roasted as whole seeds and then ground and added and see what a difference it makes). Finally chicken that you should use aer thighs and legs and not breast for an authentic preparation and no onions and peppers either. I would also add some chopped cilantro in the marinade.

You normally grill onions and serve them alongside the chicken

For Biryani, it's hard to comment on the recipe as some schools of thought may think the recipe is authentic. There are so many biryani recipes out there. Given I am a Muslim and grew up on good Moghulai food that recipe does not appeal to me at alll.

I would say if you want a recipe for a good biryani and I am biased towards a lamb/goat biryani over chicken you should follow a good Hyderabadi recipe for it. I have posted a recipe that is pretty authentic. The only correction I would make is marinate the meat overnight and not for an hour. It's not enough and I like to cook my biryani once I add the rice in the oven (crank it up to 350 degrees for 30 minutes then reduce to 250 and cook for 2-3 hours).

Forgot the link but here it is -> Hyderabadi Biryani Recipe - How To Make Hyderabadi Biryani - How To Prepare Hyderabadi Biryani Recipe
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Old 02-29-2008, 07:39 AM   #15
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I very much agree with all that Yakuta has to say. The Tandoori chicken recipe is OK, I wouldn't have thought you needed that much yoghurt or lime juice, and I wouldn't add any marinade whilst cooking, in fact there shouldn't be any left over, it should all be coating the chicken. I use a similar recipe for chicken breasts, and it works just fine. Use fresh ginger (not powder) and coriander leaf, again as Yakuta suggests. Here's a tandoori chicken breast I made earlier:



The biryani recipe is a let down, IMHO. It misses the whole point of biryani, which is a layered mix of rice and meat, usually lamb/mutton/goat/chimaera, then cooked on dum (kind of steaming) for a while so that all the flavours mix and develop. This is not a good biryani, infact I would have to say it is not a biryani at all. It may poduce an edible result, but do you want an ordinary dish, or one with a great wow factor? Biryanis are not easy to perfect, and probably reflect the amount of work that the cook is prepared to put in. Again, here is one I prepared earier (it is not traditional, but looks nice?)



Giggler: If you want to try the vindaloo again, don't use prawns/shrimp, don't add potatoes or tomatoes, (if Pataks suggested this, they obviously know nothing about how to make a vindaloo); it is a pork stew with spices, garlic, wine vinegar (or locally produced palm toddy vinegar) chillies (local conical shaped ones) and a few other ingredients, but not potatoes, tomatoes, coconut or cream or yoghurt.

Giggler, if you want to start again, I'm sure there are those amoung us that will be very willing to point you in the right direction, so that you may experiece what Indian cuisine really has to offer. If you need to use the spice paste, I'm sure we can accommodate that too, though the result won't be quite as good, IMHO


cheers
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Old 03-01-2008, 01:43 PM   #16
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ingredients

I had a lamb vindaloo last night. Can anyone tell me what the name of the green chilis is? I want to try and make my own vindaloo from scratch but I want to use authentic ingredients. I have/can get everything but the chilis and don't want to use habaneros for this. ANy suggestions/recommendations?
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Old 03-02-2008, 09:40 AM   #17
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Goans don't use green chillies in vindaloo, they use dry red chillies. The fresh green chilli is used as a vegetable, and is used to 'punctuate' a dish, that is, add a fiery punch. By contrast, the red chillies used in a vindaloo are mixed into the marinade. After that they are fried with the marinated meat to extract the heat components into the oil, which is mixed with water (to cover the meat chunks) and stewed. The final dish imparts an overall warm glow, rather than be punctuated by blisteringly hot chunks of green chilli.
If you cannot get the real goan chillies, try for the round ones (variety mundu, from the Portuguese mondo, meaning world) which have medium pungency, failing that, any medium pungent dry red chilli.
You are right not to use habaneros, they have a fruity flavour which, IMHO, does not go well with Indian food.
HTH
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Old 03-06-2008, 03:31 PM   #18
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I agree with the other posters here... if you find that you don't like Indian food the first time, don't give up! The first several times I tasted a curry, I really didn't like it. Then, after some time, it began to grow on me. I think many people aren't fond of it when they first try it-- if you're new to curries the flavors are so strange!

Now Indian food is my favorite thing in the world-- I eat it all the time and just LOVE it. An indian buffet sounds like a great idea (though I can't imagine the quality would be great)... it's definitely better not to give up on curry! :)
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Old 03-06-2008, 03:32 PM   #19
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Wow, Waaza... I just took a good look at your pics. Gorgeous food!! And very well photographed, too. I just had dinner but it's enough to make my mouth water.
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Old 03-07-2008, 04:40 PM   #20
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For Tandoori chicken, Shan spice mix works okay.
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