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Old 10-25-2006, 10:05 AM   #21
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"Ethnic" Cuisine means different things to different people.

Based upon what I'm reading from your list, absolutely EVERYthing we eat in the USA is "Ethnic Cuisine."

What is it you are considering "Ethnic Cuisine?"

For instance, I don't consider Soul Food in that category. It's plain old American food. But if you're not Black or from the South, I guess you might think it's "Ethnic." I sure don't think of French cooking as "Ethnic!" nor Italian, which I grew up eating! so please clarify what you mean by "Ethnic" cooking
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:31 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehlcee
my favourite comfort food which I can't have anymore because of diabetes is my dad's potato with egg. I think it's filipino or spanish omelet.

slice up a bunch of potatoes like french fries. fry in med-low heat until just tender. not mushy or golden brown. if they stick together, that's good. Beat up a couple eggs with pinch of salt. pour over the potatoes. flip. serve hot. it should be more potatoey than eggy. yummm...
Hi Ehlcee, that's Spanish omelette if you're interested to know. I grew up in the Philippines and I tasted this for the first and only time at a Spanish restaurant in Manila. A Spanish friend took us there and did all the ordering. This friend was craving for this potato omelette dish. He was so happy eating it I guess it was also comfort food for him. I have a recipe for this dish in my Spanish Tapas cookbook...
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:48 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune
"Ethnic" Cuisine means different things to different people.

Based upon what I'm reading from your list, absolutely EVERYthing we eat in the USA is "Ethnic Cuisine."

What is it you are considering "Ethnic Cuisine?"

For instance, I don't consider Soul Food in that category. It's plain old American food. But if you're not Black or from the South, I guess you might think it's "Ethnic." I sure don't think of French cooking as "Ethnic!" nor Italian, which I grew up eating! so please clarify what you mean by "Ethnic" cooking
It wasn't too clear to me too that's why I didn't answer the question posted... 'Ethnic' is a relative term, with connotations of being strange and exotic. Chinese and Filipino are considered in the West as ethnic but I grew up on both so they're not exotic to me. It's possible that I'll consider them under 'favorite food', but somehow I'd be unwilling to place them under 'favorite ethnic food'.
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Old 10-25-2006, 11:16 AM   #24
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Everything IS ethnic food! In that it has a different ethnicity, and DC is international.

That's why I included by "home cuisine" on my list. On an international site we are all "foreign" and the food has different ethnicities. American food is as "ethnic" to me as, say Spanish food. American counts as ethnic!
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Old 10-25-2006, 11:45 AM   #25
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Lest we forget, this thread is under the Ethnic Foods forum. DC is international but it is also U.S.-centric to an extent. This is just an observation, not a criticism.
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Old 10-25-2006, 03:00 PM   #26
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My favourite ethnic food is vietnamese food. All dishes from this country have this tangy, exotic flavour, that makes the first bite often a bit weird. The aftertaste however make you want to have more. And the memory of each meal stays for years.
Favourite vietnamese dish is banh bao (steamed bun), sweet and fluffy on the outside, and meaty on the inside. Another favourite is springrolls. Both differ from simular dishes in asia, in the way meat in used raw, not pre-cooked, directly in the dough/wrapping (or at least thats the way I have learned to make them from vietnames people).
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Old 10-25-2006, 03:40 PM   #27
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Omigosh! How does it go? So much food, so little time. I like so many different types of cuisine, but I think Italian would top my list. There's something so seductive about all the wonderful sauces and flavors of Italy. Each region is a treasure chest.

My Uncle Bill's mother, Grandma Grillo, came from Sicily. She had 13 children and could cook the doors off any stove. I didn't care for spaghetti and meatballs until I had hers. After the first taste, I wanted to crawl into the pot. I don't know what she did to the meatballs but they were tender and delicately flavored. They were the size of tennis balls and were so good no one ever stopped at eating just one. I can still see the tray at the side of her stove piled high with them as she cooked them.

Her lasagna recipe has been passed down to other generations. Unfortunately, her meatballs and spaghetti recipe went with her to the Pearly Gates. St. Peter is dining well.
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Old 10-25-2006, 04:18 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
Omigosh! How does it go? So much food, so little time. I like so many different types of cuisine, but I think Italian would top my list. There's something so seductive about all the wonderful sauces and flavors of Italy. Each region is a treasure chest.

My Uncle Bill's mother, Grandma Grillo, came from Sicily. She had 13 children and could cook the doors off any stove. I didn't care for spaghetti and meatballs until I had hers. After the first taste, I wanted to crawl into the pot. I don't know what she did to the meatballs but they were tender and delicately flavored. They were the size of tennis balls and were so good no one ever stopped at eating just one. I can still see the tray at the side of her stove piled high with them as she cooked them.

Her lasagna recipe has been passed down to other generations. Unfortunately, her meatballs and spaghetti recipe went with her to the Pearly Gates. St. Peter is dining well.
How about sharing Grandma Grillo's lasagne recipe with us?
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Old 10-25-2006, 04:53 PM   #29
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I'll do that this coming weekend. I'll have to type it into a Word document from the handwritten notes I have then I'll post it. It's yummy.
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Old 10-25-2006, 05:15 PM   #30
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French Bistro Grub
Traditional Sichuan
Japanese
Ethiopian

I love the purity of flavor in French Bistro Grub and Japanese foods. I love the techniques of the French, Japanese, and Sichuan cuisines. The spice mixtures of Sichuan and Ethiopian foods are incredible. I personally like the simplest preparations from these cuisines. The one-dish/pot/wok wonders.
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