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Old 05-09-2009, 12:53 PM   #31
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Sauerkraut Soup

4 smoked ham hocks or smoked pork knuckles
1 ring smoked kielbasa
1 lb. sauerkraut - rinsed
1/2 oz. dried mushrooms
1 (15 oz) can red kidney beans
10 c. water
2 Tbls. Flour and Crisco (vegetable shortening)
Hungarian paprika, salt and ground pepper to taste

Place hocks in water and bring to boil. Add mushrooms, kielbasa and beans. Simmer 1 hour. Add sauerkraut and cook for 1/2 hour.
Brown flour in melted Crisco and add 1/2 c. water, mix well. Simmer till well blended and then add to soup.
Turn off and let stand. Remove kielbasa and hocks. Cut kielbasa into rounds, remove meat from hocks and add back to soup.


Stuffed Cabbage

1 pound ground beef
1 pound ground pork
2 rings smoked kielbasa - 1 ring chopped small for filling, 1 ring sliced into rounds for layers.
1 lg. onion - chopped fine
3 lg. cloves garlic - chopped fine
2 Tbls. Hungarian paprika - or to taste
1 Tbls. Dry parsley
1 Tbls. salt
1 Tbls. Ground black pepper
1/2 tsp. MSG (optional)
2 lg. cans Sacramento tomato juice
2 lg. bags sauerkraut, save juice
2 lg. heads cabbage


Par cooked rice - 3/4 c. rice, 1 c. water and 1/2 tsp. salt - mix together, bring to boil. Turn off, cover and let sit while you prep the rest.

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.

Core head of cabbage, place in boiling water and ladle water into core. BE VERY CAREFUL! Remove leaves as they separate and plunge into large bowl of ice and water. Save small center leaves. Drain leaves and remove center ribs from leaves. Chop ribs and small center leaves.

Make layers: Layer some of the sauerkraut, then a layer of chopped cabbage ribs and leaves and then a layer of sliced kielbasa rounds in bottom of lg. Dutch oven (or 2). (if you have any filling left over from the leaves layer it with the kraut and kielbasa layers)

Mix beef, pork, spices, 1 ring kielbasa (chopped small), onion, garlic and rice (save any liquid). Mix well.

Lightly pack a small handful of the meat mixture and place in the center of a cabbage leaf. Fold top part of leaf over mixture, then fold in the sides and roll until mixture is completely encased. Lay rolls on top of sauerkraut and sliced kielbasa layers in pot. Repeat the layers and rolls till pot is almost full. Ending with a kielbasa layer. Fill pot with the kraut juice and tomato juice (and any rice liquid).

Cover pot and simmer 1 - 1 1/2 hours or until filling is completely cooked. Add more tomato juice if needed.
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Old 05-09-2009, 09:46 PM   #32
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kranne, when I mentioned Hungarian Pastries I was thinking of those big nut rolls. Most excellent! Of course there are too many others to think about. Thanks for looking me up so soon on facebook - good to meet you! David
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:57 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kranne View Post
spaetzle: I thought it's something I don't know... it turned out that I do. I haven't heard this name yet. I thought their english name is noodles. :)
I'm still looking for what u mean with weinkraut. :)
and how did u get to know Hungarian food? do u have some acquaintances or relatives, or travelled somewhere to europe or how?
I checked the site, thanks... I haven't thought that there's such a site like that. I was amazed. :)
Weinkraut= feherboros izesitessel=Savanyitott kaposzta
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:51 PM   #34
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Weinkraut= feherboros izesitessel=Savanyitott kaposzta
Ooppss, are we supposed to us an online translator to figure out what this means. It is in Hungarian, at least, isn't it?
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Old 05-19-2009, 06:29 AM   #35
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msfot, I had to laugh .... I make cabbage rolls once every winter, and it is pretty much as you describe. My recipe is from Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Slovak, and other eastern European women, which I just cook from memory. My mother in law taught me to core the head of cabbage, then spear it with a huge fork. Boil the cabbage until the leaves are pliable and tear off easily. THEN, the trick that really helps, "shave" the spine of the leaf of cabbage. That way it rolls much more easily. I use V8 vegetable juice because Sacramento isn't available here, but I agree with you that it is best. I recently made this for a dinner party and was surprised at how much people loved it. Good quality paprika is the real trick to this meal. I live in a small midwestern town, and get frustrated at times when I can't find just what I want. But I've got a "spice guy" who can get me both hot and sweet paprika. Oh, by the way, I don't precook the rice, just put it in raw. The slow cooking actually makes it so that the rice absorbes the flavor of the sauce I cook it in.
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Old 05-19-2009, 03:44 PM   #36
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Okay, "justplainbill" doesn't want to translate. So this American Hunky will have to wonder why. But Cabbage Rolls are another thing. They are kind of like hamburgers in my family: you can fill them with anything you want and they will probably be great. And you don't always have to cover them with tomatoes.
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Old 05-19-2009, 05:03 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by mbasiszta View Post
Okay, "justplainbill" doesn't want to translate. So this American Hunky will have to wonder why. But Cabbage Rolls are another thing. They are kind of like hamburgers in my family: you can fill them with anything you want and they will probably be great. And you don't always have to cover them with tomatoes.
See
Ferihegy Kft.

PS = sorta means translates to
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Old 05-19-2009, 06:58 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire View Post
msfot, I had to laugh .... I make cabbage rolls once every winter, and it is pretty much as you describe. My recipe is from Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Slovak, and other eastern European women, which I just cook from memory. My mother in law taught me to core the head of cabbage, then spear it with a huge fork. Boil the cabbage until the leaves are pliable and tear off easily. THEN, the trick that really helps, "shave" the spine of the leaf of cabbage. That way it rolls much more easily. I use V8 vegetable juice because Sacramento isn't available here, but I agree with you that it is best. I recently made this for a dinner party and was surprised at how much people loved it. Good quality paprika is the real trick to this meal. I live in a small midwestern town, and get frustrated at times when I can't find just what I want. But I've got a "spice guy" who can get me both hot and sweet paprika. Oh, by the way, I don't precook the rice, just put it in raw. The slow cooking actually makes it so that the rice absorbes the flavor of the sauce I cook it in.
hello. what made you laugh? btw both of those recipes are from my aunt's hungarian mil. i used to call my aunt's husband "uncle hunky" because i have 2 uncles and to cousins with the same name. the original recipe calls for uncooked rice but my mom would parcook the rice to speed the cooking and it still absorbs the tomato juice and i have "sauce" to pour over the rolls which i love!!
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