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View Poll Results: What's your favorite non-American food?
French 4 9.30%
Italian 13 30.23%
German 0 0%
British 0 0%
Mexican 10 23.26%
Asian 16 37.21%
Voters: 43. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-21-2004, 09:52 PM   #11
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Italian hands down
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Old 09-22-2004, 02:15 AM   #12
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I grew up eating all types of Asian food my whole life.

Italian would be my favorite (namely Southern Italain cooking from the regions of Puglia, Umbria, Naples, Campania, and Sicily) follwed by Greek, then Mexican.
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Old 09-22-2004, 03:33 AM   #13
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My favorite wasn't a choice on your poll..

INDIAN!!

SOOO many wonderful things to choose from. I would eat Indian every day if I could.
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Old 09-22-2004, 07:03 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Audeo
With most of my formative years spent on Okinawa, I love Japanese food with a deep passion. There is so much so far beyond sushi, to which I admit addiction.
Emeril should go to Okinawa. He'd appreciate their cooking because of all the places I know of, in Okinawa, PORK FAT RULES. No joke. Pork is like the national food for Okinawans.

There is a dish there where they simmer fatty belly pork in some kind of soy sauce based liquid and the fatty pork is delicious. It melts in your mouth.

A family friend is Okinawan and they make this dish where they wrap slices of fatty pork in konbu, seaweed, and simmer it in the soy sauce based liquid and that stuff is fantastic.
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Old 09-22-2004, 08:50 AM   #15
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You're right about the pork, Psiguy. And I'm guessing the pork dish you are describing is Rafute (soy glazed pork -- the meat is slowly simmered for hours in a pork-bonito stock with soy and a dab of ginger). I always preferred the Okinawan version of tofu (they call it Dufu, as I recall) that is slightly saltier, because they use ocean water to make it. It's heavier, firmer than Japanese tofu and I recall it was mostly broken into chunks instead of sliced. And there is NOTHING as sweet as their Beni Imo (sweet potato)! The things are purple and a very common dessert mashed with grated ginger and topped with sesame seeds. Ahhh...sweet potato and fish tempura! Oh, an Andagi!!! (Their version of donuts.)

It's interesting, with our take on pork fat, that Japanese people are noted for living the longest on this planet, and of the Japanese, Okinawans live the longest of all.

Really miss the place....warmest people on Earth.
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Old 09-22-2004, 09:09 AM   #16
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I'm with you velochic - Indian would be right up there with Asian, with Italian in 2nd place.

I can't figure out why there's so little interest in the US in Indian food since we seem to take to so many other cuisines. Anyone want to speculate?
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Old 09-22-2004, 09:30 AM   #17
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It seems to my that Indian food is becoming very popular in the US. It seems everywhere I turn there is a new Indian restaurant. As a matter of fact I can think of 4 Indian places all within 1 mile.

I used to have Indian food as a kid. I did not like spinach or yogurt or mushy veggies. I am so happy I decided to re-try it again as an adult. It is quickly becoming one of my favorite types of cuisine.
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Old 09-22-2004, 09:40 AM   #18
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Most of the Indian food I've had has been so fiery that I couldn't taste it for the heat. I'm sure there's plenty of dishes with less voltage, but haven't been curious enough to check them out.
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Old 09-23-2004, 10:06 AM   #19
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Mudbug - Indian restaurants almost always have a disclaimer that says "spicy does NOT mean hot". You can tell them that you want it mild, usually using a scale of 1 to 10. Personally, I'm an 8 kinda person. If I don't break out in a sweat and feel like my mouth has preceeded me to the 9th level of he!!, I've not eaten good Indian. Seriously, though, it is a very wonderful and rich cuisine and if you ask for mild, you may very well find that it's one you'll enjoy immensely. Start with a Chicken Tandoori or a Dal Mahkni (lentils) or Keema Mataar (lamb stew) or Maatar Paneer (my personal favorite - homemade curd cheese with peas). These are all usually very satifying to the exploring palate. Give it a whirl and good luck!!!
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Old 09-23-2004, 10:10 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic
Mudbug - Indian restaurants almost always have a disclaimer that says "spicy does NOT mean hot". You can tell them that you want it mild, usually using a scale of 1 to 10. Personally, I'm an 8 kinda person. If I don't break out in a sweat and feel like my mouth has preceeded me to the 9th level of he!!, I've not eaten good Indian. Seriously, though, it is a very wonderful and rich cuisine and if you ask for mild, you may very well find that it's one you'll enjoy immensely. Start with a Chicken Tandoori or a Dal Mahkni (lentils) or Keema Mataar (lamb stew) or Maatar Paneer (my personal favorite - homemade curd cheese with peas). These are all usually very satifying to the exploring palate. Give it a whirl and good luck!!!
Hey, thanks for the ideas. Born to be mild, that's me.
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