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Old 05-02-2015, 11:08 PM   #21
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The thing is...everyone voting No already is an accomplished cook from what I've read. It might be more accurate a poll if it was directed at newbs, not cooks who are good at cooking already.

Say you're a recently wed woman (or man I suppose) with little cooking skills. I think it would be neat to have a pro come to your house and teach me some cooking. I too thought this might be a possible business to start up (which may be the reason for the post). Teaching newlyweds and others how to cook right on site. It'd be better than learning from words printed in a book. I would hire such a person, to learn the basics, not necessarily European cuisine.
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Old 05-03-2015, 03:32 AM   #22
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I have had people ask me to teach them how to cook. I have had friends suggest I offer to teach people how to cook. I am not a professional cook or trained chef (although I play one once a week). I have two young lads (13 and 10) who either come to my house to learn how to make something (sort of like I'm their third grandma--I prefer auntie--not quite old enough to be their parents' mom). They come out 2x/month. We decide on what it is this week. A lot of that is just teaching them how to approach ingredients and play in the kitchen. I have a middle-aged single person who asked me how to cook, plan, and shop. My thoughts are that s/one might be interested in learning how to plan, shop, and then cook, but I don't know that you'd get a lot of clients. I don't charge the boys--that is play time for me, too and it is passing on what my grandma taught me. The other person is a PITA, so yes, I do charge him. And, of course I charge for the time I spend developing recipes, testing them, shopping for the ingredients, and, having spent a lot of time wearing my purple "glam" gloves washing prep pans today from Friday's cooking spree, I charge for that, too. That again involves a lot of "play" time where I get to test ideas and go from there. I don't charge for all the time I think about food and how to work with it.
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Old 05-03-2015, 04:32 AM   #23
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I wouldn't, but that doesn't mean it isn't a good idea.


I've known of people who go out in the world without a clue as to how to take care of themselves, much less something like take on a new cuisine. And in the home, using their own resources (i.e., stove, pots, utensils, etc.) and food products they can get locally For example, the nearest Asian market is a couple hours away. Nothing burns my butt worse that sites and shows that say something is readily available everywhere when the show is from New York or some other big city ... they mean it is available everywhere in New York, not in small town USA. And forget that old saw about only eating fresh, local, in season produce -- I still want to know where these so-called experts are getting beautiful fresh produce in, say, Michigan, in the winter? Do they only eat out of cans and the freezer during those months so as to not touch trucked-in produce?


The point is, someone in your home might be able to help stretch a novice's repertoire using the reality of that person's life. TV and web sites can frustrate experienced home cooks with, gee, my stove is electric, I don't have that kind of pan, and what do I use for that ingredient that I can buy at MY grocery store in MY town?
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Old 05-03-2015, 09:01 PM   #24
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I think I would. Not basic beginner classes...I'd go for leaning to cook something new and I'd invite friends and make it a party/dinner.

One of the most popular programs I do at my library is a Thai cooking class by a local caterer. We have no kitchen, so she does what she can with her propane burners and rice steamer. It's a hoot even in a library meeting room...everyone gets to chop/roll/whatever and we eat. A group of us has been talking about having her cater dinner at one of our homes. A class would be fun.
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Old 05-04-2015, 08:56 PM   #25
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I would. Especially if it was baking classes.


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Old 05-04-2015, 11:58 PM   #26
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How can you trust that the teacher is competent and not an Internet idiot?

I'm on a lot of food boards and this type of question has arisen a lot lately.

Call me a total skeptic .... Unless it's Eric Ripert making Branzino in my crappy kitchen.
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Old 05-05-2015, 12:06 AM   #27
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If I were to even entertain the idea, I want some references and a copy of their Rap Sheet if there is one. And if there were, the answer would be an out and out flat NO!

After the episode with the Craig's List murderer, I would have to be extra cautious taking someone from the Internet. Even if it were Bobby Flay, Mario Batali or The Pioneer Woman.
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Old 05-05-2015, 04:13 AM   #28
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This has been an interesting read as I've been away from DC for 10 or more days.

I think the OP probably was testing the waters for a business, and not a bad idea with the right customers without cooking experience. True, in the past anyone who could read could cook if they really wanted to, and today with cooking video's (good ones), the time has past needing to pay for private home lessons.

On the other hand, Bookbrat's experience sounds terrific!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookbrat View Post
I think I would. Not basic beginner classes...I'd go for leaning to cook something new and I'd invite friends and make it a party/dinner.

One of the most popular programs I do at my library is a Thai cooking class by a local caterer. We have no kitchen, so she does what she can with her propane burners and rice steamer. It's a hoot even in a library meeting room...everyone gets to chop/roll/whatever and we eat. A group of us has been talking about having her cater dinner at one of our homes. A class would be fun.
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:23 AM   #29
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I have attended hands on cooking classes with Shrek at our version of Whole Food Store and have enjoyed them. But, having someone come to the house for a lesson? No thanks.
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:02 AM   #30
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Quote:
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I have attended hands on cooking classes with Shrek at our version of Whole Food Store and have enjoyed them. But, having someone come to the house for a lesson? No thanks.
I love having "the lads" come to the house and cook. We've made cheese, bread, pie crust, etc. They come to me to learn how to play with food. They are coming out this Saturday to make dog cookies. I developed the recipes for a rescue organization in 2003. The cookies will go in a big jar for "guess how many cookies are in the jar" to raise funds for an organization that provides foster care for the pets of women leaving abusive relationships. The lads made cupcakes on National Cupcake Day to help raise funds for the humane society. Their goal was $100. They raised almost $400 going door-to-door in their neighbourhood. I am so proud of them.
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