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Old 05-16-2012, 11:23 AM   #11
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Are we not all ethnic then? Some are the majority some in the minority?
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:26 AM   #12
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I dont think of myself as ethnic!
My first husband came from The Lakes District and I considered him ethnic. Although he had more of a Scottish brogue than an English accent.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:58 AM   #13
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Are we not all ethnic then? Some are the majority some in the minority?
Pretty much. Though some Yanks have such a mix it's kinda hard to say what their ethnicity would be.
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Old 05-16-2012, 12:27 PM   #14
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Are we not all ethnic then? Some are the majority some in the minority?

Since this site is U.S. based, English cuisine is considered "ethnic". If this site originated in the U.K., than American cuisine (Louisiana crab cakes, dirty-water hot dogs, ad infinitum) would be considered "ethnic". A cooking site originating in Thailand would consider BOTH of us "ethnic".

It's location; nothing else. You're making it sound like "ethnic" is a dirty word. It's not.
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Old 05-16-2012, 01:51 PM   #15
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Which of my comments made ethnic sound like a dirty word ? I think just some of our conversations are lost in translation. You mean I am in the minority because most of the members of the site are US based. If you were a member of a group mainly UK based I still wouldnt think of you as ethnic either.
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Old 05-16-2012, 03:25 PM   #16
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How I love the convenience of the internet when wondering about the answers to questions!

There's lots of interesting information about the subject here.......

Ethnic group - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:04 PM   #17
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I dont think of myself as ethnic!
I'm from Montana, you Brits are a big part of my Ethnic heritage, a proud part of my Ethnic heritage.
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Old 05-17-2012, 12:08 AM   #18
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Here in the sleepy hamlet of Los Angeles Yorkshire pudding usually means just one thing: a kind of bread prominently featuring juices from roasted beef.

Sleep beckons but I hope tomorrow I can post some sort of recipe. I've cooked it many times and it is very excellent when served with roasted beef.

Not that I have any authority in things Yorkshire-ish.
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Old 05-17-2012, 04:10 AM   #19
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Anyhoo, not a problem am sure we are all v proud of our heritage and our countries I know I am.

I love Yorkshire Puds, much harder to master these days as I have to make gluten free ones but with a little patience it does work. Cant beat a good yorkshire pud with roast beef or a nice toad in the hole.
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Old 05-17-2012, 07:37 PM   #20
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Okay here's the Yorkshire pudding recipe I'm familiar with. Keep in mind that I'm just a L.A. dude who has never been to UK, although much of my family tree came from there.

I Googled the recipe to refresh my memory because I have no record of how I made it. But it's not all that hard. The recipes differ in amounts and proportions but they generally go like this:

flour
eggs
milk
a pinch of salt
and the most important part: beef drippings!

First you mix up the batter ingredients except for the beef drippings, then pour it into a large pan or casserole dish (maybe oiled or greased to keep the bread from sticking). It is a thin batter, way thinner than bread batter, maybe about the thickness of pancake batter. Then you take a generous amount of beef drippings including fat and bits and everything and swirl it into the batter. More beef drippings is IMO better than less beef drippings. The exact amount of swirling is an art. If you mix it up completely uniform then it's totally wrong. Some of the beef drippings need to get swirled into the interior of the batter but should be in a random way and barely mixed, and some of the beef drippings should be floating on top. The finished Yorkshire pudding is supposed to be a little bit greasy.

Then you bake it in your oven--30 minutes at 450 degrees?--until it's done and serve it hot, with the roast beef (preferably prime rib roast). You cut it into pie shaped slices. The part in the middle sinks down, the part around the edge is usually fluffy, and the browning varies throughout. The rustic appearance is part of the allure. (IMO) Some parts of the middle are supposed to be higher, other parts lower, non-uniform thickness.

That's the way my favorite restaurant made Yorkshire pudding when I first encountered it and I've never had better. I have no idea how they cooked it but in later years when I began cooking my own recipe it turned out fairly similar.

One of these days I'll cook it several times and get the amounts and proportions of ingredients right.

One question: It always annoyed me that I didn't have the beef drippings until the roast was done, and the baking generally takes about perhaps 30 minutes at 450 degrees, but by that time the beef has cooled too long.

I've sometimes thought to make a prime rib roast and save all the juices, freeze them, and then next time I make a prime rib roast I can overlap the last 30 minutes of cooking the roast and making the Yorkshire pudding at the same time. And then I save the juices from that prime rib roast for the next time.

So is this anything like the Yorkshire pudding served in Yorkshire?
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